Skip to main content

View Diary: A Libertarian Reads “Atlas Shrugged” - Part 1 (173 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  She was no master of prose, to be sure (6+ / 0-)

    But I also think that we err in placing this failing directly on her.  She was both a Russian and the founder of Objectivism; she didn't understand the egocentrism of American culture or anticipate its increase in the consumer age.

    Have you read Neal Stevenson's "Snow Crash"?  It is a great take on similar themes through a postmodernist filter.

    The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

    by Jay Elias on Sun Dec 06, 2009 at 05:55:00 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  Also worth pointing out (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Debby, Jay Elias, Pinko Elephant

      that Vladimir Nabokov came out of somewhat similar circumstances as Rand and managed to become a great author.  Not a universally loved author, but certainly a great one.

      Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

      by pico on Sun Dec 06, 2009 at 06:00:11 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  If I had the time... (8+ / 0-)

        ...the artist I'd most like to diary would be Kandinsky.  The path of his art directly contradicts his life experiences - his darkest, most conflicted works coming from his luxurious thirties and forties in Germany, his breakthroughs coming upon his forced return to Russia at the outbreak of WWI, the joyousness of his works after his fortune is confiscated by the Soviets, and the hope of his works during his Bauhaus period after the Soviet regime has cost the life of his only child.

        For someone whose life was entirely defined by the major events of his era, Kandinsky's work was not perceptibly affected by them at all.

        The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

        by Jay Elias on Sun Dec 06, 2009 at 06:04:25 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  PS (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        pico, wondering if

        I'd say that the difference between Nabokov and Rand is that Nabokov had talent.  Which isn't an insult to Rand - but Nabokov didn't have to work as hard to get his ideas across.

        The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

        by Jay Elias on Sun Dec 06, 2009 at 06:09:11 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  To Philip Rearden that means Nabokov (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Jay Elias

          didn't deserve the fruits of his labor.  That's a recurrent theme in AS.  That the naturally talented don't deserve love, respect or money because they didn't have to work for it.

          Results count for more than intentions do.

          by VA Classical Liberal on Sun Dec 06, 2009 at 06:14:57 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  P. Rearden is not Rand (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            VA Classical Liberal

            I think I follow you here, but just to be clear: The words she put in Philip's mouth - that the naturally talented don't deserve a reward (a concept beautifully mocked by Vonnegut in Slaughterhouse Five) is exactly the mindset she is arguing against.

            That is what you meant, I'm sure.

            Republicans can't accept that they've lost. Democrats can't accept that they've won.

            by DanK Is Back on Sun Dec 06, 2009 at 06:30:49 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  I'd disagree a bit with that, insofar as Nabokov (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Jay Elias

          had to work extremely hard: he's a definite disciple of Flaubert, who'd stay up all night looking for the one word he needed in any given circumstance.

          Granted, yes, he had more innate talent than Rand.  But he's much more Beethoven than Mozart in that respect.

          Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

          by pico on Sun Dec 06, 2009 at 06:15:06 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  Great talent consists in part (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Jay Elias, pico

          of making the difficult (and sometimes the impossible) look easy. It takes a LOT of hard work to pull that off.

          Republicans can't accept that they've lost. Democrats can't accept that they've won.

          by DanK Is Back on Sun Dec 06, 2009 at 06:32:14 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site