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View Diary: There Was No Centennial for Indian Territory (32 comments)

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  •  Dawes Act and Indian Territory (0+ / 0-)

    Here's Section 8 of the Dawes Act:

    SEC. 8. That the provisions of this act shall not extend to the territory occupied by the Cherokees, Creeks, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Seminoles, and Osage, Miamies and Peorias, and Sacs and Foxes, in the Indian Territory, nor to any of the reservations of the Seneca Nation of New York Indians in the State of New York, nor to that strip of territory in the State of Nebraska adjoining the Sioux Nation on the south added by executive order.

    In short, a number of areas were explicitly excluded from the Act, including the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory.

    And, yes, the Curtis Act of 1898 (not 1908) is what brought allotment to these areas of Indian Territory that had been excluded from the Dawes Act (I don't know if it also did so to the Seneca Nation or the Sioux lands in Nebraska).

    Stop Obama's Wars Now! Bring the Troops Home!

    by GreenSooner on Sun Dec 13, 2009 at 08:08:46 AM PST

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    •  They were "excluded" from the Dawes Act, (0+ / 0-)

      which is why their land was stolen from them.

      Why is the Curtis Act so relevant today?

      She nourishes us; that which we put into the ground she returns to us. Big Thunder

      by Winter Rabbit on Sun Dec 13, 2009 at 08:54:40 AM PST

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      •  Your Diary and the Dawes Act (0+ / 0-)

        Your diary concerns Indian Territory.  It also rightly complains about the provisions of the Dawes Act. But the Dawes Act did not apply to Indian Territory. The law that made the provisions of the Dawes Act apply to most of the residents of Indian Territory was the Curtis Act.  

        If we're going to invoke history, getting the details right is important.

        Stop Obama's Wars Now! Bring the Troops Home!

        by GreenSooner on Sun Dec 13, 2009 at 09:10:01 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  From your own link, (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jcrit

          "The Curtis Act of 1898 was an amendment
          to the United States Dawes Act."

          http://nativeamericanfirstnationshis...

          When the United States Congress passed the Dawes Act in 1887, it made Indian nations wards of the state. The act voided all native land claims and redistributed title to these lands among the Indians themselves. Originally, the Five Civilized Tribes and the Sac, Fox, Sioux and Seneca Nations were excluded from the provisions of the legislation—partially due to preexisting treaties and the fact that all resistance in these tribes had been more or less dulled by their existence on reservations. It furthermore stipulated that the territorial borders of these tribes would not be included in the creation of any further American states. However, the act was amended several times in subsequent years and eventually all tribal lands were absorbed by the United States for re-allotment.
          This made it easier for the United States to deal with Native American land claim issues. No longer would they have to bribe or force tribal chiefs to sign treaties that were often eventually contested. Another provision of the Dawes Act was the creation of state run schools for Native American children. The ulterior motive of this provision was to speed up the process of cultural assimilation.

          Read more at Suite101: Dawes Act and Indian Territory: Sooners and Oklahoma Statehood | Suite101.com http://nativeamericanfirstnationshis...

          The Curtis Act and Dawes Act were not separate pieces of legislation, the Curtis Act was an amendment. Thought you said, "getting the details right is important."

          And how nice, after being forced to go there, it didn't apply at first, but then it did.

          Once again, why is the Curtis Act so relevant today?

          She nourishes us; that which we put into the ground she returns to us. Big Thunder

          by Winter Rabbit on Sun Dec 13, 2009 at 10:09:57 AM PST

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        •  Also during that time, (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jcrit

          they were (in the book I linked on the Dawes Commission) not wanting another Wounded Knee. There were some following the Ghost Dance. If you were going to steal land from entire Nations and you didn't want another major armed conflict, that's exactly how you'd do it. Exempt them make them think it's alright, then sweep the rug out from under them.

          Again.

          100 Years in the Land of the Red Man

          "When the Allotment Era came into being, it changed every perspective we had on land--it went from the control of the tribe to the control of the individual," he explained.
          Those individuals, Jones recounted, were illegally taxed and many lost their land by their failure to pay those taxes, largely because their grasp of the new and foreign concept of individual private land ownership didn't quite match the speed of the government's enforcement of its imposed tax policy.

          She nourishes us; that which we put into the ground she returns to us. Big Thunder

          by Winter Rabbit on Sun Dec 13, 2009 at 10:18:25 AM PST

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