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View Diary: Checking Your Privacy at the Border (30 comments)

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  •  What are they looking for, anyway? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kurt, spacecadet1, ilovecheese

    Is there anything that restricts them to looking exclusively for terrorists and wanted criminals? Or should ordinary people be concerned about being arrested for DMCA violations and the like?

    Every horror committed by man begins with the lie that some man is not a man. - Jyrinx

    by kyril on Wed Dec 16, 2009 at 10:06:58 AM PST

    •  ANYTHING! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kurt, ilovecheese

      A few months earlier in the same airport, a tech engineer returning from a business trip to London objected when a federal agent asked him to type his password into his laptop computer. "This laptop doesn't belong to me," he remembers protesting. "It belongs to my company." Eventually, he agreed to log on and stood by as the officer copied the Web sites he had visited, said the engineer, a U.S. citizen who spoke on the condition of anonymity for fear of calling attention to himself.

      - WaPo

      Nabila Mango, a therapist and a U.S. citizen who has lived in the country since 1965, had just flown in from Jordan last December when, she said, she was detained at customs and her cellphone was taken from her purse. Her daughter, waiting outside San Francisco International Airport, tried repeatedly to call her during the hour and a half she was questioned. But after her phone was returned, Mango saw that records of her daughter's calls had been erased.

      - WaPo

      •  I understand that (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        kurt, spacecadet1, ilovecheese

        and the privacy concerns, which I share and which would make this bad enough. The loss of privacy creates an opening for all sorts of potential abuses.

        But are travelers currently in danger of being arrested and prosecuted if evidence of electronic lawbreaking unrelated to terrorism or smuggling is found on their device during a border search?

        Every horror committed by man begins with the lie that some man is not a man. - Jyrinx

        by kyril on Wed Dec 16, 2009 at 10:26:29 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yes. (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          kurt, kyril, spacecadet1, ilovecheese

          I believe the original case that eventually went to appeals involved child pornography.

          The "current policy" doesn't specify what customs is allowed to search. Essentially, its a fishing expedition.

          It'll really hit the fan when the recording industry finally persuades (ie. contributes to a political party) customs to search for illegally obtained media. We'll see more 12yo's arrested under DCMA.

    •  No (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kurt, kyril

      They have been using the same intelligence collection procedures used against terrorists in the war on drugs...and who knows what else.

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