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View Diary: Texas State Board of Education Primary Delivers Upset (244 comments)

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  •  no... but y'all could set some standards (7+ / 0-)

    and force Texas to make better textbooks or lose your business.   Just sayin'.

    Join us in the Grieving Room on Monday evenings to discuss mourning and loss.

    by Dem in the heart of Texas on Wed Mar 03, 2010 at 06:07:52 AM PST

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    •  Unfortunately it doesn't work that way. (11+ / 0-)

      Texas has the biggest say because they are a big state dictates that all their textbooks be used statewide

      Their power comes from the number of books they buy, not the content of them.

      In any case, I live in Alabama. Do you really expect Alabama to set standards that are any better than Texas?

      "When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him." -- Jonathan Swift

      by Jane Lew on Wed Mar 03, 2010 at 06:29:09 AM PST

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      •  sure it does. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ivorybill, worldlotus, ParkRanger

        California doesn't buy TX textbooks because TX won't conform the books to their standards.  (I will grant you that California doesn't have money for ANY textbooks, but that's sort of a side issue here.)

        Now, if your state is just as bad, why blame Texas for the content of the textbooks?  It looks to me like they're just supplying what is being demanded.  

        I don't love the books any more than you do.  But when you can get Alabama to raise its education standards, then is when it might be appropriate to blame Texas for the shoddy quality of their textbook content.

        Join us in the Grieving Room on Monday evenings to discuss mourning and loss.

        by Dem in the heart of Texas on Wed Mar 03, 2010 at 06:37:50 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  sorry, but disagree (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Jane Lew, worldlotus

          $$ trumps all in this discussion.  

          •  but that's my point. (4+ / 0-)

            If the "Free market" for textbooks insisted on products that were actually decent, Texas would climb all over itself to produce something decent.

            Texas is its own textbook purchaser, and we in the state are working on our SBOE's sanity, in hopes of changing it from the inside.

            But it is also incumbent on other states to insist on higher standards, instead of just complaining about the product and shelling out $$ for it.

            I guess I'm just tired of hearing about all those sub-par books that are simply being FORCED on other states against their will.  It takes two to make a sale.

            Join us in the Grieving Room on Monday evenings to discuss mourning and loss.

            by Dem in the heart of Texas on Wed Mar 03, 2010 at 07:03:24 AM PST

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          •  I agree, however, how about forming (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MJB

            a buying group of several states to challenge the buying power of Texas?

            "Kindly go render the fat in your head in a large kettle of boiling water. Thank you." - Bumblebums

            by balancedscales on Wed Mar 03, 2010 at 09:12:08 AM PST

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          •  When you consider that public schools are usually (0+ / 0-)

            funded by property taxes, schools just do not have the money.

            Property values have gone down and with them the amount of taxes collected.

            School budgets are under heavy pressure. Spending more money on textbooks is just not in the cards when you are having to cut everywhere else.

            "When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him." -- Jonathan Swift

            by Jane Lew on Wed Mar 03, 2010 at 12:41:26 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  Even though it is now possible (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          martini, balancedscales

          to print books to order, book companies do not want to do this because it limits their profits.

          Text book companies want to make one version of textbooks because they make more money that way.

          To  enforce what is best for the book companies, they prohibitively price orders for nonstandard textbooks. If each state orders made-to-order texts, the price goes straight up. Especially in these rough budgetary times, states can not pay the extra costs associated with bespoke textbooks.

          My children did not go to public schools in Alabama. They went to public schools in...guess where...Texas. The public education there was 10 different kinds of awful.

          In in case, I will only be in Alabama until next week. I am leaving the United States to live elsewhere.

          "When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him." -- Jonathan Swift

          by Jane Lew on Wed Mar 03, 2010 at 08:00:37 AM PST

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      •  On the odd chance we did part with Texas ... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Odysseus, Jane Lew

        it would be to adopt lower standards, not higher ones.

        _Karl Rove is an outside agitator._

        by susanala on Wed Mar 03, 2010 at 06:40:01 AM PST

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    •  The difference is that in most states ... (4+ / 0-)

      ... county school boards buy the textbooks. Texas and California are among the few states that buy books statewide, and both are large-population states. The textbook publishers know if they sell textbooks to Texas and California they make a profit and if not they take a huge loss. So they write textbooks for the standards set in Texas and California.

      •  So if the books for TX are so bad (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Dem in the heart of Texas

        won't other schools just go to the ones written for the CA market?

        Besides that, I'm sure that other English speaking countries have textbooks as well - Britain, Australia, Canada, all have schools too.

        Those won't help much for US history books, but those don't need to be replaced very often (the facts of history certainly don't changed, though the spin might). Any school that bought US history books in the last 5-7 yrs is probably still using them.

      •  the real problem, then, is (0+ / 0-)

        the school districts/boards of education.  There are at least two varieties of textbook available - California's and Texas's.  

        It just seems really bass-ackwards to blame mean ol' Texas for having shitty textbooks (which I'm not denying), when the truth is that the shitty textbooks are exactly what the other states are in the market for.

        Join us in the Grieving Room on Monday evenings to discuss mourning and loss.

        by Dem in the heart of Texas on Wed Mar 03, 2010 at 12:47:06 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

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