Skip to main content

View Diary: Alone and Frozen, First Black Woman Legislator in SC Dies (248 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  The gas doesn't matter if there's no electricity (13+ / 0-)

    All modern heating systems (post 1950s) use electrical sensors and electrical starters.

    If there's no electricity, there's no heat, no matter the heat source.

    The electric company killed her, and someone is trying really hard to prevent people from recognizing that fact.

    •  Not necessarily. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dvalkure, Senor Unoball

      Oil heat is very common too, even today. Your power can go out, but you'll still have heat. That's how Maine gets by even with the serious power outages in winter.

      ...Achieve access to health care for everyone in my country. This has been the political cause of my life... EMK

      by SlackwareGrrl on Thu Mar 11, 2010 at 07:01:10 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Not the *vast* majority of furnaces made since (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Senor Unoball, kyril

        the 1950s. Most furnaces and boilers have an electronic igniter. Without electricity, it simply never turns the heat on. With most gas appliances, there are also electronics to detect flame rollout. If the electronics aren't reporting due to lack of electricity, it shuts down until electricity returns.

        Most people I know in Maine use wood as a backup heat source for when the power goes out. Ditto for VT and NH, but not so much in Eastern, MA where power goes out less frequently.

        •  True (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Senor Unoball, kyril

          But there's a reason it's "most" and not all. I would never buy one with an electronic igniter for a family or elderly person who couldn't manage wood heat in the event of a power failure.

          ...Achieve access to health care for everyone in my country. This has been the political cause of my life... EMK

          by SlackwareGrrl on Thu Mar 11, 2010 at 09:19:08 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Unfortunately, it's really hard to find one (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Senor Unoball, kyril, cai

            ... that doesn't have safety features, and even harder to find anyone to install it (most heating contractors won't go near the unsafe heaters with a ten foot pole, for liability insurance reasons).

            Combustion appliances have these shutoffs to prevent death from carbon monoxide poisoning, fires due to "flame rollout" (for those with pilot lights), and explosions. They save lives.

            The real solution is to ensure those who are vulnerable can't have their heat shut off, even indirectly - and to make sure that someone who lives nearby can check on them if there is a storm that knocks power out.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site