Skip to main content

View Diary: Alone and Frozen, First Black Woman Legislator in SC Dies (248 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  asdf (0+ / 0-)

    The 20th was probably the earliest possible day,

    You really have to stop saying these things with zero evidence.  How could you possibly know this, short of asking the coroner?  

    Presumably, the coroner would not give a time of death on the far far end of the possible range of times, so this is a dubious claim.  Bear in mind that you are alleging she died a good week later, not that the coroner was off by a mere 24-48 hours.  
     

    Her behaviors don't make a lot of sense if the electricity was on at the time of her death, but make perfect sense if it was off.

    She had dementia.  It is silly to discard the facts on the grounds that her behavior would make more sense that way.

    I know the article was written in a way that points toward the 20th, but that doesn't mean the article clearly expresses what happened. We all know that reporters rarely get nuance right.

    Now you are conflating the reporter with the coroner.  If you think the reporter misquoted the coroner, then fine, but you should back that up.  As it stands, it just sounds like you are trying to talk away an unwanted fact.

    •  Yes she had dimentia (0+ / 0-)
      1. But she also died because the temperature in her house was too cold to support her life (hypothermia).
      1. I am saying that the reporter may or may not have clearly expressed what the coroner said.

      How do you know any of the things you assert short of asking the coroner?

      I base my assumptions on the way these incidents have played out time and time again for many, many years. You apparently don't live in a cold region and don't hear about the annual deaths (especially before the laws changed in the 1970s) in which EXACTLY the same thing happens - elderly person living alone gets cold after the power goes out, puts on a bunch of layers, and is found dead from hypothermia some time later by neighbors or relatives.  

      It is not even remotely a stretch to think that the exact same scenario that plays out dozens of times a year in the northern tier of the country is not what happened here, when all of the same elements confluxed. It is more of a stretch to think that the power company turned off her electricity (and heat) after she died from too little heat. Possible? Yes. Likely? Not so much.

      Though clearly we're both going to stick to our own conclusions on this, and unless the coroner comes out with some announcement specifically stating that she cannot have died [after the power went out/before the power went out], we'll stay that way.

      Peace.

      •  asdf (0+ / 0-)

        But she also died because the temperature in her house was too cold to support her life (hypothermia).

        That's not what hypothermia means.  I've explained this several times before, so I won't repeat that here.

        You apparently don't live in a cold region and don't hear about the annual deaths (especially before the laws changed in the 1970s) in which EXACTLY the same thing happens.

        I do live in a cold region.  In fact, I grew up near Chicago, a city which has some notoriety for killing elderly people with power outages.
         
        But I also know cases of elderly people getting hypothermia without their power being cut.  There are plenty of cases that match the reported facts; you don't need to swap them around to make it fit.

        Also, it obviously isn't EXACTLY the same thing happening, if your theory contradicts the reported facts.  Nor is it too much of a coincidence if you have to alter the facts to get a coincidence.  The question is, what do you do when data doesn't fit a belief?  Do you accept the data or stay with the belief?

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site