Skip to main content

View Diary: Why we HAD to invade Iraq (214 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  The problem for the Sauds isn't competition (4.00)
    Rather, it's not competition per se.

    The problem for the Sauds is more complex.

    First, there was a period post-9/11 (even now, some would argue) when the Sauds were basically telling us to fuck off. They had top level connections to the attack (at the very least through Prince Nayef), and they weren't about to help the US investigate it, because it would embarrass the Saudis and force them to "resolve" their internecine squabbles. Which, according to a lot of estimates at the time would mean the collapse of the Saudi house. So the Sauds need to prevent the US from destabilizing the very precarious balance it maintains between those who support the Wahhabis and those who support reform.

    That's all well and good so long as we depend on the Saudis to be our swing producer--so long as we depend on them to release more oil to keep prices stable in times of oil shocks. They've got us over a barrel, as it were.

    At the same time, even the presence of the US military is destabilizing Saudi Arabia. We can't leave (because the Sauds would be overthrown and we'd lose our swing producer), but we can't stay, because it will invigorate the Wahhbi militants. Something has to give.

    So for the US, you find another swing producer that will also be amenable to a few bases. That way, you don't rely on the Saudis to house your military (you've still got the Israelis, but you need something in the Arab world, preferably something breathing distance from Tehran). That new swing producer was going to be Iraq.

    That's the threat to the Sauds. If they don't have our nuts in a petroleum lubricated vice, then we no longer have a reason to protect them--or even, to go easy on the fact that 15 Saudis launched the biggest attack on US soil launced in decades. If they don't have our nuts in a petroleum vice, they're existentially threatened.

    •  I agree with your points entirely (none)
      That is the more complex reality, which I took the liberty to simplify somewhat. But the key point (which was the simplified short-hand I reduced it to) is when you say:

      At the same time, even the presence of the US military is destabilizing Saudi Arabia. We can't leave (because the Sauds would be overthrown and we'd lose our swing producer), but we can't stay, because it will invigorate the Wahhbi militants. Something has to give.

      This is exactly the point. This is the reality of the codependent relationship which the Bush (read Carlyle, big oil, et al) and Saud have. BDM et al and the oil revenues prop up the Royals in order to get the oil., while the Saudi's have to walk the tight-rope to placate the Arab street while big oil sucks the oil from under their land.

      cheers,

      Mitch Gore

      Nobody will change America for you, you have to work to make it happen

      by Lestatdelc on Thu Jan 13, 2005 at 11:04:54 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  The War Imperative Will Continue (none)
        as long as oil is "black gold".  Identifying the root cause of the war as the oil market is valuable, but this history will repeat itself until such time as we lessen our dependence on oil.  Efficient and economical alternative energy sources are the only real hope, yet few resources are devoted to identifying and developing promising technologies when compared to the money and lives spent on exploiting and controlling oil reserves.

        Fuzzy only works for pets.

        by NotFuzzy on Thu Jan 13, 2005 at 11:26:52 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

  • Recommended (147)
  • Community (57)
  • Baltimore (38)
  • Civil Rights (37)
  • Bernie Sanders (33)
  • Culture (29)
  • Elections (28)
  • Economy (27)
  • Law (25)
  • Texas (23)
  • 2016 (21)
  • Rescued (20)
  • Environment (19)
  • Labor (19)
  • Education (18)
  • Hillary Clinton (18)
  • Racism (17)
  • Freddie Gray (17)
  • Politics (16)
  • Barack Obama (16)
  • Click here for the mobile view of the site