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View Diary: Planning my Ta-ta For Now Tour (75 comments)

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  •  In Texas cities have zoning... (2+ / 0-)
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    smellybeast, MKSinSA

    ...but counties don't. Oftentimes a lot of the growth occurs in area before it becomes annexed (or reaches a city's ETJ where it has limited control) and therefore regulated. And because the stereotypical Texas libertarian attitude, many places have extremely lax zoning requirements.

    "So it was OK to waterboard a guy over 80 times but God forbid the guy who could understand what that prick was saying has a boyfriend."--Jon Stewart

    by craigkg on Wed Apr 07, 2010 at 07:47:17 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Not Houston, though (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      craigkg, smellybeast, MKSinSA

      From Business Week:

      What is unique about Houston is that the separation of land uses is impelled by economic forces rather than mandatory zoning. While it is theoretically possible for a petrochemical refinery to locate next to a housing development, it is unlikely that profit-maximizing real-estate developers will allow this to happen. Developers employ widespread private covenants and deed restrictions, which serve a comparable role as zoning. These privately prescribed land use controls are effective because they have a legal precedence and local government has chosen to assist in enforcing them.

      Some investors are understandably apprehensive about the lack of clearly defined rules. Houston developers have long recognized these concerns and have responded, particularly in suburban markets, by producing planned business and industrial parks that have rigorous covenants and deed restrictions. Not surprisingly, the sites receiving the attention of institutional investors, especially in suburban markets, tend to be in planned

      "How Houston gets along without zoning"

      It includes a reference to a twenty-three story high rise that was opposed by Mayor White.  I wondered how they went about blocking that, if indeed they did.  When I was visiting there were signs from a community group that had been formed to oppose it.  I suppose economic pressure, as opposed to municipal action.  

      Policy, Peace and Progress Before Party

      by Alec82 on Wed Apr 07, 2010 at 07:54:17 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  They can zone... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        smellybeast, Alec82

        ...they just choose not to. The move towards covenant based restrictions has been a response to the city deferring to exercise the power Texas Municipal Code gives them. You see this a lot with subdivisions for the upper middle class up to the rich quite a bit in Texas. We had several areas west of Austin that developed this way before annexation. Infact the restrictions in the covenants are often much more stringent than even the most restrictive city zoning ordinances.

        "So it was OK to waterboard a guy over 80 times but God forbid the guy who could understand what that prick was saying has a boyfriend."--Jon Stewart

        by craigkg on Wed Apr 07, 2010 at 08:00:50 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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