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View Diary: We Could Have Stopped It 100 Times, And We'll Fail Again (243 comments)

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  •  Your diary breaks my heart (15+ / 0-)

    I share your concern about invasive species, although my specific focus is invasive plants, most of which are originally purchased as exotics for gardens. We need to regulate the sale of exotic plants, too.

    For most people (even lots of people who generally support protecting the environment), the outdoors is what I call "the green blur." In other words, as long as there's some kind of plant and animal life in the forests, lakes and streams, everything seems okay. It looks green, so it's fine.

    This is the attitude we have to work to change if we want to influence policy. That's one of the reasons I write foraging diaries. Learning more about plants and physically getting outside and interacting with them shatters the green wall and makes people care about individual species.

    Interested in identifying and eating wild plants? Check out my foraging diaries.

    by wide eyed lib on Tue Apr 27, 2010 at 11:18:44 AM PDT

    •  Thinking about plants (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wide eyed lib

      A special place in hell would be too good for the person who let Purple Loosestrife loose in our wonderful wetlands.

      Distrust of authority should be the first civic duty. - Norman Douglas

      by Fossil on Tue Apr 27, 2010 at 06:29:31 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  They were sold as "ornamentals" and went feral (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        wide eyed lib

        There used to be ads for "lythrums" (loosestrife, mainly purple but some sports) in all the nursery catalogs. They didn't realize how fast and far the damn things would spread.

        Paulownia's gone feral all over the Blue Ridge - no way to stop it, and not much desire to, since the wood is valuable once the tree grows big enough to harvest.

        If it's
        Not your body
        Then it's
        Not your choice
        AND it's
        None of your damn business!

        by TheOtherMaven on Tue Apr 27, 2010 at 09:53:54 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  They've had some good success releasing beetles (0+ / 0-)

        in some places. The beetles eat nothing but the loosestrife.

        Another huge problem right now is lesser celadine (Ranunculus ficaria). It's also especially invasive in wetlands, and the monocultural stands it creates crowds out everything else.

        Unfortunately, many of the people who see it find it pretty.

        Interested in identifying and eating wild plants? Check out my foraging diaries.

        by wide eyed lib on Wed Apr 28, 2010 at 04:24:37 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Kudzu is attractive...to some who've no idea (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wide eyed lib

      what it is.  I've read that goats love - and ravage - kudzu & wonder why goats aren't used to help in its control. Too low tech, perhaps.

      "Evil is a lack of empathy, a total incapacity to feel with their fellow man." - Capt. Gilbert,Psychiatrist, at the end of Nuremberg trials.

      by 417els on Tue Apr 27, 2010 at 09:22:32 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I'm lucky to live north of the kudzu problem (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        417els

        Unlike other kinds of biological controls (insects and fungi), you can't just release goats into the wild. They have to be gathered up after they eat and cared for somewhere. That takes money and people-power that greatly overstrapped parks departments simply don't have.

        The good news is that there's some biofuel potential in kudzu fields. Kudzu takes next to no inputs to grow, so it's much more efficient than corn.

        It's good eating too.

        Interested in identifying and eating wild plants? Check out my foraging diaries.

        by wide eyed lib on Wed Apr 28, 2010 at 04:34:07 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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