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View Diary: Why network neutrality is so hard to legislate (29 comments)

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  •  Oh, really? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    stanjz

    Just who am I supposed to go to? Most of us have only one or two choices for broadband. The big phone company, or the big cable company. When they both start throttling, just where do I take my subscription?

    "They paved paradise, and put in a parking lot."
    "...Don't it always seem to go, that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone?"
    - Joni Mitchell

    by davewill on Tue May 04, 2010 at 04:49:39 PM PDT

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    •  Clear is starting to get big. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      debedb, erush1345

      So is WOW. RCN is around, Verizon, Juno, cricket, cox, insight.

      Lots of DSL services around, dial up is still an option (a shitty one, but still there).

      If you want fast reliable broadband, yes your options are limited. I fail to see how that's Comcast and AT&T's fault or problem. They offer a good service that is highly sought after. If it doesn't work for you, there are other options. They won't be as good as AT&T or Comcast, but what do you want? Some billionaire to develop his own high speed network and let people use it for free?

      Don't act like two companies have you over a barrel. If Comcast or AT&T or both start doing shady stuff with their ISP services, people will leave and they will lose money.

      And then those companies I listed above will get bigger and better and more competitive.

      A man who views the world the same at fifty as he did at twenty has wasted thirty years of his life. --Muhammad Ali

      by TheBlaz on Tue May 04, 2010 at 04:57:38 PM PDT

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      •  I laugh. (0+ / 0-)

        Almost no one has Comcast and Cox available at the same time. Juno, Cricket and Insight only exist because of common carrier rules...the same type of thing you say we don't need. If I get DSL from them, it STILL comes through my local phone provider. Cricket is wireless, comes through a big cell provider, and hardly qualifies as competition for real broadband, anyway

        "They paved paradise, and put in a parking lot."
        "...Don't it always seem to go, that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone?"
        - Joni Mitchell

        by davewill on Tue May 04, 2010 at 05:13:22 PM PDT

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        •  Very limited options (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          debedb

          Dial-up telephone service is common carriage.  The telephone companies need that, because their right to use the poles and cross the streets depends on it.  So they limit common carriage to as little as possible but keep it going.  I'm a bit concerned that the Broadband Plan talks about making pole attachment easier. That is a good thing in general, but it could have the consequence of removing any pretense of common carriage.  That would suit AT&T's "close down the PSTN" position, and it may not actually be an unintended consequence.  For now, you can still dial up an ISP in most areas (some states are even making that difficult), but what kind of service is dial-up today?

          Most of the US population (I don't have the number but I think it's between 50 and 75%) can get two broadband providers, one telco and one cable.  A few can get three (RCN or WoW, for instance) and many can get only one.  And some get none.

          Wireless is not a real substitute.  Its cost of bandwidth is far, far higher than wireline, so almost every wireless service has a low usage cap, a per-gigabyte (or per-megabyte) price, or restrictions on how it can be used.  Some small Wireless ISPs don't do any of that, but they ration capacity and don't have a whole lot per user.  We had a story in the news a couple of days ago about a Verizon Wireless customer who got an $18,000 bill because he was tethering a computer to the phone, and the promotional rate ran out.  It's obscene.  But even a fair price is more than cable or DSL for a heavy user.  Clearwire's target is nomadic users, and people outside of DSL range.  College students (living off campus) are typical; they move at the beginning and end of the school year so they want nomadic service.

        •  Sounds like (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          debedb

          you want all the benefits with none of the negatives as far as internet goes.

          If you live in the right area, then yes, you can have that.

          If not....

          Sorry, cupcake. Not happening.

          I'd be tickled pink if fast, affordable internet was available countrywide, but it's not. And Net Neutrality will not change that; in fact, it will only make it worse.

          A man who views the world the same at fifty as he did at twenty has wasted thirty years of his life. --Muhammad Ali

          by TheBlaz on Tue May 04, 2010 at 11:38:01 PM PDT

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      •  BTW, I want those government created (0+ / 0-)

        monopolies to be regulated to a fare thee well, so that the internet can continue to develop. Didn't I make myself clear?

        "They paved paradise, and put in a parking lot."
        "...Don't it always seem to go, that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone?"
        - Joni Mitchell

        by davewill on Tue May 04, 2010 at 05:20:51 PM PDT

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        •  You made yourself perfectly clear (0+ / 0-)

          you just don't seem to have a solid grasp on the reality of the situation.

          No worries. It happens.

          A man who views the world the same at fifty as he did at twenty has wasted thirty years of his life. --Muhammad Ali

          by TheBlaz on Tue May 04, 2010 at 11:39:17 PM PDT

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