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View Diary: Daily Kos Oilpocolypse ROV #31 (387 comments)

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  •  Wow! Look at the saw go! (9+ / 0-)

    Is this one of the smaller pipes on the downslope riser?

    Stepping up to life eliminates the capacity for bullshit. - Robinswing

    by Onomastic on Tue Jun 01, 2010 at 01:19:00 PM PDT

    •  Yes, I think so. (4+ / 0-)

      In the general vicinity of where the hydraulic shears was working earlier. Then again, I could be wrong.

    •  It looks like they are cutting away the small (7+ / 0-)

      pipes that run along the riser.

      Here's what I had posted earlier:

      I still think they should have cut away the small pipes at the cut point to allow for a better fit and cleaner cut. If they can minimize crimping here it will put less stress on the kink and improve the diamond wire cut.

      If there are excessive forces at the kink, it may blow the riser off before it is cleanly cut and break the wire.

      They also would have achieved a better cut if they had fitted the hydraulic shears with custom jaws that matched the profile of the riser.

      •  Read that comment Claudius. Made perfect sense. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Yasuragi, Jaygar, Claudius Bombarnac

        Obviously. :)

        Stepping up to life eliminates the capacity for bullshit. - Robinswing

        by Onomastic on Tue Jun 01, 2010 at 01:26:59 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I have another concern about the diamond wire (5+ / 0-)

          cutter. I think the pressures within the riser and drill string at the kink will deform the material at the cut point before the cut is finished.

          This will pinch and break the wire. It will be next to impossible to restart the cut.

          The odds of getting a clean cut, in my estimation, are very slim. The kink area is way too dynamically unstable.

          So, I would like to see them chew away at the kink with other means to relieve some of those forces before starting the diamond wire cutting procedure. Possibly even expose the drill string.

          Unfortunately, the drill casing is going to do God knows what when it is cut through. It's like cutting a pipe within a pipe with a hacksaw - if the inner pipe is not held absolutely still, it won't work. The blade simply binds.

          •  OK. That scares me to death. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Yasuragi, Claudius Bombarnac

            But wait a minute. Last I knew they were doing the diamond cutting below the kink - on the body of the BOP itself.

            What am I not getting?

            Stepping up to life eliminates the capacity for bullshit. - Robinswing

            by Onomastic on Tue Jun 01, 2010 at 01:49:23 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  The cut will be right below the kink on the same (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Yasuragi, Onomastic

              piece of riser and leave a stub as far as I know from latest info.

              I had posted a few days ago that I thought the diamond cut would take place between the two flanges connecting the riser to the BOB. I also assumed they would use the hydraulic shears to cut the riser at or slightly below the kink.

              The wire would then would have been cutting through gasket material and bolts at a more rigid point.

              It seems I was wrong...

              •  So they changed where they positioned the (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Yasuragi, Claudius Bombarnac

                diamond saw late last night/early this morning?

                Stepping up to life eliminates the capacity for bullshit. - Robinswing

                by Onomastic on Tue Jun 01, 2010 at 02:03:31 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  I never did see where the saw was positioned... (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Onomastic

                  so I don't know if it was changed.

                  Because there are two LMRP Caps on site with different attachment configurations, it is possible they have two choices on where to cut.

                  So, cutting between the flanges may already be one of their options. I sure hope so because I'd much prefer the cut there instead of leaving a stub.

                  It's all educated guessing on my part...

                  Now, there's the problem of what happens when the drill string gets cut through - will it drop down or will it get pushed up or will it just remain in position.

      •  You sir are damn good! ........ n/t (3+ / 0-)
        •  And he's ours! How lucky are we? (4+ / 0-)

          Stepping up to life eliminates the capacity for bullshit. - Robinswing

          by Onomastic on Tue Jun 01, 2010 at 01:41:20 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Lucky enough to get a small lecture.. hehehe (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            bwren, Jaygar

            When cutting steel with a mechanical shearing action, three things take place sequentially as the blades exert force on the material.

            1 - deformation
            2 - cutting
            3 - fracturing

            In normal shearing operations, deformation is about 5%, cutting 30% and finally fracturing 65%. These are just basic figures and each is traded off against the other for tool life, quality of cut, power requirements and a host of other factors.

            The shears being used will probably have deformation in the lead, followed by fracturing because the fit of the blades is not very good.

            These shears mainly cut by exerting so much force the material simply fractures.

            Crunch is not a delicate eater....

        •  Tks. My old engineering job required me to think (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Tomtech, Yasuragi, Onomastic, Jaygar

          outside the box. I did a lot of trouble shooting in the field.

          •  So did I. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Claudius Bombarnac

            My job was to charge a minimum off $400 for a half day including travel time to go to places I had never been and find the problems on machines I had never seen. And the site mechanic, electrician, and/or engineer hadn't been able to fix and had probably made thing worse trying to save the money it would cost them.

            The only problems my superiors had with me was I would get the job done before we soaked the customer for every dime and whenever I had to bail out my co-workers it made them look bad to the customer because I found the problem too quickly.

            I'm no Nate Silver, TomTech, or VoteforAmerica ("WineRev" Eeman, Recounting Minnesota)

            by Tomtech on Tue Jun 01, 2010 at 02:32:31 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Looks like we both had the same job... (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Tomtech

              Lots of Redeye flights from one end of the country to the other. On one occasion, I didn't even have time to fly home for a week and a half to change clothes.

              They just told me to throw the dirty stuff out and buy new ones followed by "We've reserved you a ticket to XXXX. You can pick it up at the airport."

              My worst problem was covering up for the sales department who fed the customer bullshit. When I arrived at the site, I had to discreetly remove this bullshit to save face for the company before I could start work.

              •  I didn't travel much. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Claudius Bombarnac

                When your base is the LA area you don't need to go far.

                My favorite was when I had to drive to Lake Havasu and check a $5 mil production line I knew nothing about.

                I called the fiancée, gave my 15yo a few bucks and drive for 8 hours (on the clock of course) Dropped the fiancée off at the Holiday Inn and went to the plant. I was in the hotel bar a half hour later.

                I went back to the plant the next morning and advised on some other items so I could get another day in the hotel. At 1:00 the fiancée and I hit the town. The next day was Sunday and I drove back while billing double time with a layover in Laughlin.(We had too drive because our equipped vehicles were a major part of our business model)

                The customer was a regular, though it was my first trip there, so he knew the deal and getting his plant up as soon as I had a chance to look over the drawings saved him a bundle.

                I'm no Nate Silver, TomTech, or VoteforAmerica ("WineRev" Eeman, Recounting Minnesota)

                by Tomtech on Tue Jun 01, 2010 at 03:14:20 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  I'm in Canada (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Tomtech

                  When your base is the LA area you don't need to go far.

                  The population in California is greater than that of the whole of Canada. I had to travel 3000 miles back and forth to reach a customer base you could cover in a days driving.

                  The money was pretty good though. But I was getting burnt out.

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