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  •  Yes, but you can find as many (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Kimberley, papicek, ArthurPoet

    evidences of his supreme joy as his darkest despair.  

    I always have a problem when people NOT named Running Bear, Kills Elk or Woman of Many Horses complain about "illegal" immigration. -- Justice Putnam

    by Yasuragi on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 09:58:16 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  hmmm... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Kimberley, ArthurPoet, Yasuragi

      offhand, I can think of little that does not have a dark twist:

      "To love that well which you must lose ere long."

      For instance.

      I'm Moving On . . . . Well, maybe not so much.

      by papicek on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 10:08:36 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Aw, gimme a break, papi. It's late and I can (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        papicek

        barely think.  ;)

        I'll come back atcha in a day or so with a list, okay?  

        I always have a problem when people NOT named Running Bear, Kills Elk or Woman of Many Horses complain about "illegal" immigration. -- Justice Putnam

        by Yasuragi on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 10:15:48 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  perhaps Sonnet 18... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ArthurPoet, Yasuragi

          which, though full of mortality, is in the end transcendent:

          "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
          Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
          Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
          And summer's lease hath all too short a date:

          Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
          And often is his gold complexion dimmed,
          And every fair from fair sometime declines,
          By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed:

          But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
          Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
          Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
          When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st,

          So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
          So long lives this, and this gives life to thee."

          On reflection, though, there's more than a hint of darkness here.

          I live and breathe Shakespeare and Dante. My soul swims in the long, slow swells of Will's rhetoric and Dante's verse (If you ever see a door with "Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch'intrate." Don't by any means go through it). I once counted the rhetorical figures in the first quatrain of Sonnet 73 - the one whose final line I quote above, and stopped when I got to 15. I'm sure I could have found more. An actress friend of mine insists I belong on stage.

          A break? Of course. This is shameless thread hijacking, after all :^)

          I'm Moving On . . . . Well, maybe not so much.

          by papicek on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 10:34:42 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I live and breathe Shakespeare, as well. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            papicek, ArthurPoet

            Dante, while deeply loved by me, is not nearly as well known.  

            I would call your mind to the discussions of the land and the life of farmers in As You Like It.

            There's love and joy and beauty in those lines.  And in the banished Duke's magnificent exhortations to his loyalists who've followed him into Arden.

            I always have a problem when people NOT named Running Bear, Kills Elk or Woman of Many Horses complain about "illegal" immigration. -- Justice Putnam

            by Yasuragi on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 10:40:55 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I promise to revisit this... (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              ArthurPoet, Yasuragi

              haven't read As You Like It in many years.

              I'm Moving On . . . . Well, maybe not so much.

              by papicek on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 10:47:35 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Do. I disliked it for many years, never having (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                papicek, ArthurPoet

                seen a good production of it but, rather, silly ones that played on the cross-dressing aspects instead of the heart of the story.  Once I read it for myself, I loved it.  (And then saw the BBC Shakespeare version, which is wonderful.)

                It's well worth the read, particularly for the interplay between Court folk and Country folk.  Wonderful stuff.

                I always have a problem when people NOT named Running Bear, Kills Elk or Woman of Many Horses complain about "illegal" immigration. -- Justice Putnam

                by Yasuragi on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 10:52:09 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

    •  i posted this a few days ago, but i am (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      phonegery, papicek, Yasuragi

      inclined to post it again, here ...

      Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
      As to behold desert a beggar born,
      And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
      And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
      And gilded honour shamefully misplac'd,
      And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
      And right perfection wrongfully disgrac'd,
      And strength by limping sway disabled
      And art made tongue-tied by authority,
      And folly, doctor-like, controlling skill,
      And simple truth miscall'd simplicity,
      And captive good attending captain ill:
      Tir'd with all these, from these would I be gone,
      Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.  
       

      Sonnet LXVII
      William Shakespeare

      ~we study the old to understand the new~from one thing know ten thousand~to see things truly one must see what is in the light and what lies hidden in shadow~

      by ArthurPoet on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 10:13:37 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  But how about... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        papicek, ArthurPoet, DawnN

        When, in disgrace with Fortune and men's eyes,
        I all alone beweep my outcast state,
        And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,
        And look upon myself and curse my fate,
        Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
        Featured like him, like him with friends possessed,
        Desiring this man's art, and that man's scope,
        With what I most enjoy contented least,
        Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,
        Haply I think on thee, and then my state,
        Like to the lark at break of day arising
        From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate

        For thy sweet love remembered such wealth brings,
        That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

        I always have a problem when people NOT named Running Bear, Kills Elk or Woman of Many Horses complain about "illegal" immigration. -- Justice Putnam

        by Yasuragi on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 10:17:54 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  ahhh, so very good, so very rich, (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          papicek, Yasuragi

          and so very wise,
          hmmm,
          those words mean much more
          than i can say, this day,

          ~we study the old to understand the new~from one thing know ten thousand~to see things truly one must see what is in the light and what lies hidden in shadow~

          by ArthurPoet on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 10:26:20 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  sweet :^) (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ArthurPoet, Yasuragi

          As for the Dante, the purist in me still thinks Ciardi's translation is best, but while Pinsky takes liberties with passages I love, his work is marvelous. Highly recommend either.

          I'm Moving On . . . . Well, maybe not so much.

          by papicek on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 10:53:55 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  It's the Pinsky that really got me. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            papicek, ArthurPoet

            Love that he found a way to follow the original meter, and that it's printed with the original Italian on the facing page.

            I always have a problem when people NOT named Running Bear, Kills Elk or Woman of Many Horses complain about "illegal" immigration. -- Justice Putnam

            by Yasuragi on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 11:03:42 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  The Ciardi's excellent... (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              ArthurPoet, Yasuragi

              he takes different kinds of liberties, and adheres to the lines of the original more closely. I don't know Italian, though I can read it with difficulty.

              I love reciting the Italian aloud. Canto III, 1-9. The inscription over the gate of hell:

              "Per me si va ne la citta dolente
              Per me si va ne l'etterno dolente
              Per me, si va tra la perdita gente.

              Giustizia mosse il mio alto fattore
              Fecemi la divina podestate
              La somme sapienza, e'l primo amore

              Dinanze a me non fuor cose create
              se non etterne, e io eterne duro
              Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch'intrate"

              This is a benchmark passage for me, the first place I look in assessing a translation and Ciardi nails it. Or, my tweaks to his translation do anyway :^)

              "I am the gate to the city of woe.
              I am the way to eternal sorrow
              Through me lies a forsaken people.

              Divine justice moved my architect
              Built was I from divine might,
              Ultimate intellect, and primordial love.

              Before me, nothing was made that was not eternal,
              and beyond time I stand:
              Abandon all hope, ye who enter here."

              I can barely type. Off to bed for me.

              Peace.

              I'm Moving On . . . . Well, maybe not so much.

              by papicek on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 11:25:52 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Sleep well, papi. Hopefully, I'll (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                ArthurPoet

                follow suit soon enough...

                And I'll watch for the Ciardi.

                I always have a problem when people NOT named Running Bear, Kills Elk or Woman of Many Horses complain about "illegal" immigration. -- Justice Putnam

                by Yasuragi on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 11:29:07 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

      •  Shakespeare's lists... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ArthurPoet, Yasuragi

        like this one, have always confounded me.

        "...Then shall all our names,
        Familiar in their mouths as household words,
        Be in their flowing cups freshly remember'd:
        Harry, the king, Bedford and Exeter,
        Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester . . ."

        I once couldn't get beyond Exeter in a recitation. So I changed it a little and kept right on plowing:

        "...Then shall all our names,
        Fresh in their mouths as household words,
        Be in their flowing cups freshly remember'd:
        Harry, the king, Bedford and Exeter,
        Abbott and Costello, Shirley and Lambchop . . ."

        Never missed a beat :^)

        I'm Moving On . . . . Well, maybe not so much.

        by papicek on Mon Jun 14, 2010 at 11:04:31 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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