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View Diary: BP Oilpocalypse Liveblog - ROV #142 (328 comments)

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  •  Thank you Captain David PA (14+ / 0-)

    for hosting the diary.

    Daily wildlife update:
    Birds: Dead = 1117, Oiled but alive = 791, Cleaned and released = 177
    Turtles: Dead = 406, Oiled but alive = 88, Cleaned and released = 3
    Mammals: Dead = 50, Oiled but alive = 1, Cleaned and released = 1

    Today I read in the NY Times that the largest percentage of dead and autopsied turtles died from shrimping, not the oil.
    It is illegal to shrimp w/o TEDs (Turtle excluder devices),

    which help turtles escape. But environmentalists have complained that some shrimpers disregard the law or do not install the devices properly.

    “I’m not surprised at all that shrimp fishing is causing a lot of turtle deaths right now, it happens every year and it’s a chronic problem that the federal government has refused to address,” said Todd Steiner, the executive director of the Turtle Island Restoration Network in Marin County, Calif., which works to protect sea turtles around the world. He said there was not enough enforcement of the law requiring the excluder devices, though turtle deaths spike every year when shrimp season begins.

    This is what happens when you shrink government. Not enough man power for enforcing even the good laws that are on the books.

    Btw, most of the dead turtles have turned up in Mississippi.

    "Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it is too dark to read." Groucho Mark

    by hester on Sat Jun 26, 2010 at 11:04:40 AM PDT

    •  Thanks for this update, Hester. There is a degree (12+ / 0-)

      of good news in knowing that more than half of the turtles died not as a result of oil poisoning. But, like you say, the anti-gov'mint Rs are the culprit.

      Kos created a site promoting a variety of views & communities; some [believe] they created dKos & it should conform to their image of it. MKSinSA 2/7/10

      by David PA on Sat Jun 26, 2010 at 11:12:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  and thank you hester for wildlife updates (7+ / 0-)

      they are so helpful to us all...

    •  Hester, have been meaning to ask: (8+ / 0-)

      What is the meaning of--"oiled but alive"?

      Are they being treated; or is it simply reporting of wildlife that is spotted, yet uncared for?

      •  Both I think, Phil. WIth the birds, they (14+ / 0-)

        first stabilize them b/f removing the oil. The oil incapacitates their ability to regulate their body temperature. Their feathers, overlapping like shingles on a roof, work to insulate them from temperature extremes. WHen they preen themselves, they are meticulously aligning their feathers to keep water and air from penetrating. This ensures body heat retention and also buoyancy.

        WHen they preen oil encrusted feathers, they of course ingest the oil.

        SO before being washed, they are first stabilized:

        The birds that are brought to rescue centers are often frightened, cold, emaciated, dehydrated, exhausted and suffering from the internal effects of oil. Initial procedures may involve cleaning the eyes, nasal and oral passages of oil and dirt, applying saline eye solution, giving oral fluids and activated charcoal solution, but not washing.

        To wash a bird that is already highly stressed and not medically stable could mean death. Many oiled bird's die because well-meaning people, anxious to get oil off the bird, wash it immediately, resulting in death from stress. It is actually more important to give oiled birds the much needed nutrition, hydration and medical treatment they need before they are washed.

        Once stable, oiled birds go through a series of tub washes alternating between baths with a one percent solution of Dawn dishwashing liquid and clean water. The wash time varies depending on the amount of oil, and the size of the bird, but on average it takes two people 45 minutes and 300 gallons of water to do a thorough washing.

        MORE than you wanted to know, right

        "Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it is too dark to read." Groucho Mark

        by hester on Sat Jun 26, 2010 at 11:46:17 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Excellent information, hester!! A question: (5+ / 0-)

          We always see that the soap used it Dawn. Wouldn't other brands work as well?

          Kos created a site promoting a variety of views & communities; some [believe] they created dKos & it should conform to their image of it. MKSinSA 2/7/10

          by David PA on Sat Jun 26, 2010 at 12:20:54 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  no, Dawn® has some (9+ / 0-)

            special ingredient that is very very gentle. I know this b/c I sometimes weave (tapestries, blankets, scarves, rugs) and often have to prepare/wash some of the woolen yarn beforehand. WHen I don't have my special wool wash, I use Dawn®. Weavers and those working in wool have known about Dawn® for a long time.

            A 2003 report by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service called Dawn "the only bird-cleaning agent that is recommended because it removes oil from feathers; is non-toxic; and does not leave a residue. Other methods or products are not recommended for use or testing during an oil spill." The International Bird Rescue Research Center began using Dawn in the late 1970s because it was economical and did not irritate a live bird's skin like other cleaners did. The California nonprofit used the dishwashing liquid to treat wildlife in the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska's Prince William Sound and to clean roughly 20,000 African penguins when a tanker sank in 2000 off the coast of South Africa.

            The organization, one of two certified in the gulf spill to rehab oil-affected animals, said Dawn is being used to clean the nearly 500 birds collected alive since the cleanup effort began.
            Parent company Procter & Gamble has donated at least 7,000 bottles of Dawn from the Kansas City, Kan., plant to rehabilitation centers in Louisiana, Alabama and Florida.

            "Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it is too dark to read." Groucho Mark

            by hester on Sat Jun 26, 2010 at 01:11:22 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  Perfect, hester---Thx. And thanks for your (5+ / 0-)

          diligence in bringing us this sad tale....

        •  bird preening/oil (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Yasuragi

          Feathers have little ridges that interlock between the strands, kinda like the seal on a zip lock bag.    Without that, they don't block air well enough to fly.      They also can provide a level of insulation, like a blanket.   Won't do much for bouyancy, though, except that the preening oil helps keep the feathers from being waterlogged (which the spilled oil might do as well) which is more of an issue with flight.      Even wet feathers can interfere with flight; thick heavy (though bouyant) oil adds weight.   Oiled birds can float but they can't fly.

          When they preen, the are zipping up the feathers and distributing oil from the preening gland that helps seal.   Less well known is that birds make vitamin D in the exposed feathers and ingest it while preening (they can't make it like we do, or would if we ever got a decent amount of sun, in the skin because it is shaded by the feathers).

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