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View Diary: McChrystal Debacle No Surprise. Most Military Hate Democrats. (61 comments)

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  •  You're Wrong (7+ / 0-)

    The poll you just cited says:

    he percentage of self-identified Republicans has decreased by one-third since 2004, from 60 percent to 41 percent, while the percentage of self-identified independents has nearly doubled to 32 percent during the same period.
    [...]
    the percentage of troops identifying themselves as Republican dropping nine percentage points from 2008 to 2009 and the percentage of those calling themselves independents increasing 10 points over the same period.

    So the actual numbers are:

    Year      R%     D%     I%
    2004      60     23     17*
    2008      50     28     22
    2009      41     27     32

    (*nearly doubled to 32 means originally at most 17)

    I suppose it depends on what you mean by "most". "Most" usually implies a significant majority, but there's no evidence that "most military hate Democrats".

    Just because you're a Republican doesn't mean you hate Democrats. Especially when about one of every two fellow soldiers is a Democrat.

    But even so, only 41% is even a Republican, which is hardly "most". It's 20% less than even barely "most", while Democrats are only 28% fewer than Republicans - and only 19% fewer than Republicans. While independents grew at the expense of Republicans over Democrats by 9 to one. Independents don't necessarily hate Democrats, either.

    Your entire premise of this diary has no basis in fact, certainly not the facts you cite.

    These career-oriented officers and mid-grade and senior enlisted members are still far more conservative than liberal, but they are less likely today to identify with the GOP, the survey shows.

    That means that the survey did not count enlisted members below "mid-grade", which is a larger population than the grades higher than them (and possibly officers who aren't "career-oriented). So it's entirely possible that these poll numbers are skewed towards Republicans and independents, because the entry-level enlisted members are more likely to be 18-25 years old, and/or female, who voted for Obama something like 65:35%. The underlying facts could very well show only that older people without career options beyond the military are more likely to be Republican than Democrat, but not overwhelmingly. As always, though much less likely than before, because more have become independents.

    In fact, what this poll shows really is only that (some) military people have grown to "hate" (or just no longer care about) any particular political party, though much more disaffected by Republicans than by Democrats. Since the whole country has gone that way, for reasons that have hit the military (and driven people into the military) more than most of the country, that's no surprise. And since Obama the trend has been to leave the Republican Party by 9 to one more than leaving the Democratic Party. Leaving Republicans as much below a majority now than it was in the majority in 2004. Which also happened to be the peak of enlistment and Bush/Republican popularity, before the cruel reality of that choice sank in.

    You're completely wrong in this diary. You should either address the actual facts and their actual implications by revising it, or delete it. Because otherwise you're cherrypicking a poll the way we expect Rasmussen and other Republican partisan pollsters to do.

    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

    by DocGonzo on Sun Jun 27, 2010 at 08:44:27 AM PDT

    •  19% Fewer Than Independents (0+ / 0-)

      Democrats are only 28% fewer than Republicans - and only 19% fewer than Republicans.

      I should have written:

      Democrats are only 28% fewer than Republicans - and only 19% fewer than independents.

      "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

      by DocGonzo on Sun Jun 27, 2010 at 10:31:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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