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View Diary: "Native languages in 'a state of emergency'" (256 comments)

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  •  What's so good about a loss of culture? (4+ / 0-)
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    capelza, dharmafarmer, Fresno, Tyto Alba

    People do have the right to choose what they speak.  But people who talk about the virtues of the "melting pot" assume there is some advantage or superiority of the majority culture.

    When you say

    From long experience here, I know this comment will be responded to mostly in knee-jerk fashion, according to the ideological lens of the respondent

    you're basically asking for abuse, because frankly, you merit abuse.  There is nothing particularly laudable about saying

    engaging in thoughtful dialog about these issues, with a humanistic emphasis on the balance between individual rights and collective interests

    Thoughtful, exactly, how?

    You, perhaps, have chosen to abandon your own background or history, I am guessing, since yours is the stance of people who do exactly that.  It's your right.  But not one I think of which you really should be proud, if that's what's bringing you to this conversation.

    Respect for others implies a respect for their history, view of the world, and  culture, even where you may disagree with many parts of their approach to the world.  But cultural majoritarianism is not something that take much courage or requires much respect.

    Even if you're trying to tell yourself it does.

    But by now, we know how the Obama administration deals with those who would destroy it: it goes straight for the capillaries. --Krugman

    by mbayrob on Sun Aug 01, 2010 at 05:04:51 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  what exactly is so horrifying about calling for (0+ / 0-)

      engaging in thoughtful dialog about these issues, with a humanistic emphasis on the balance between individual rights and collective interests?

      How does a "balance" equate in your mind to "abandoning your own background or history".

      And why do you engage, first and foremost, in "guessing" about the heritage, background, ideology and motives of another human being, rather than simply listening to what they say, and responding to it?

      How do your comments in any way, shape or form reflect "respect for others"?

      You're like Andy Breibart calling his victims racist.  

      Is that your idea of:

      Respect for others implies a respect for their history, view of the world, and  culture, even where you may disagree with many parts of their approach to the world

      Or is this what you mean:

      Sounds like a great deal of ideological, glibertarian self abuse to me.

      Or, is this how you express your "respect for others":
      You're not a serious person, and worse, you seem to lack the insight to realize how laughable that makes you.

      Or, this:

      Go find some other place to play with yourself so folks that actually have something interesting to say can discuss a serious issue with frivolous folks like yourself interfering.

      Or, this:
      He doesn't think this is the right room for an argument.

      He think's that's down the hall, and that this is Abuse

      Or, this:

      There's nothing more elitist that prescribing cultural assimilation to cultural and ethnic minorities.

      Or, this:

      You want to call poverty a "choice", then you're probably commenting in the wrong place.  I'm not sure if Andrew Breibart lets you comment on his site, but that's the kind of attitude you're showing.

      Or, is this your notion of "respect for other people":

      if you had a clue about what happens in a community that is in that decline, you'd shut your damn mouth and slink away to hide a while.

      Or, this:

      I don't think they'd get your point which is why they are such fun to make fun of.

      So, please, enlighten me, since you are an authority on "respect for others" and how it "implies a respect for their history, view of the world, and culture, even where you may disagree with many parts of their approach to the world".

      How is:

      engaging in thoughtful dialog about these issues, with a humanistic emphasis on the balance between individual rights and collective interests?

      Profoundly insulting and disrespectful, while all your comments, quoted above, represent the pinnacle of "respect for others"?

      Always make new mistakes - Esther Dyson

      by RandomActsOfReason on Sun Aug 01, 2010 at 11:07:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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