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View Diary: Confessions of a Tea Party consultant (19 comments)

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  •  I keep envisioning what exactly their "utopia" (6+ / 0-)

    would look like, and I keep returning to Somalia, but with food courts.

    "It's war. It's one damn thing after another" -- Julian Assange

    by mydailydrunk on Mon Aug 02, 2010 at 01:07:14 AM PDT

    •  having just read the article (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      northsylvania, lawnorder, arlene, jnhobbs

      this diary referred to, I have a gut feeling that makes me want to call BS.  Not on the entirety of it, but there's something that I can't put my finger on that feels wrong.

      could be the cheap coffee I'm drinking.  I want to look at it again in the AM with fresh eyes.

      "Stable of writers over at biggovernment"?  I dunno.

      "It's war. It's one damn thing after another" -- Julian Assange

      by mydailydrunk on Mon Aug 02, 2010 at 01:18:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Ya something is off (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mydailydrunk

        The entire article is a bit self congratulatory and was obviously written before the Sherrod episode. But the guy who was trained on military Intel / Israeli special forces, the dozens of politicians, the "be afraid, very afraid" tone also got me a bit suspicious.

        The Reagan Revolution Is Washing Ashore in the Gulf of Mexico

        by lawnorder on Mon Aug 02, 2010 at 06:47:46 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  It is all too familiar, he must be the new (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mydailydrunk

        Donald Segretti

        The attack on Shirley Sherrod is just the tip of the iceberg on what they will do.

        Doesn't sound real? Check out  history

        Then there is what Pat Buchanan did for Nixon

        Buchanan Outlined Plan to Harass Democrats in '72, Memo Shows

        By George Lardner
        Washington Post Staff Writer
        Monday, March 4, 1996; Page A07

        Republican ... Patrick J. Buchanan strongly favored a plan of "covert operations" to harass and embarrass Democratic contenders in the heady days at the Nixon White House before the Watergate scandal.

        Then a White House speechwriter and enthusiastic member of the Nixon campaign's "attack group," Buchanan laid out his ideas in an April 10, 1972, memo looking ahead to that summer's Democratic National Convention in Miami Beach. It was addressed to Attorney General John N. Mitchell and White House Chief of Staff H.R. Haldeman.

        On the memo's last page -- one never turned over to Watergate congressional investigators -- Buchanan and his top aide recommended staging counterfeit attacks by one Democrat on another, fouling up scheduled events, arranging demonstrations and spreading rumors to plague the rival party, all the while being careful not to run afoul of the Secret Service.

        It continued:

        "The preparation of attacks on one Democrat by another -- and 'endorsements' of one Democrat by another, which has to be repudiated, are examples of what can be done. Nothing should be done here, incidentally, which can seriously backfire and anything done should be cleared by the highest campaign authority.
        snip

        "We should guard here against a) anything which enables the Democrats to blame us for the mess which takes place in Miami Beach; b) anything which can be traced back to us and c) anything which is so horrendous as to damage us, if the hand is discovered."

        *************************
        FBI Finds Nixon Aides Sabotaged Democrats

        FBI Finds Nixon Aides Sabotaged Democrats

        By Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward
        Washington Post Writers
        Tuesday, October 10, 1972; Page A01

        FBI agents have established that the Watergate bugging incident stemmed from a massive campaign of political spying and sabotage conducted on behalf of President Nixon's re-election and directed by officials of the White House and the Committee for the Re-election of the President.

        The activities, according to information in FBI and Department of Justice files, were aimed at all the major Democratic presidential contenders and -- since 1971 -- represented a basic strategy of the Nixon re-election effort.

        During their Watergate investigation, federal agents established that hundreds of thousands of dollars in Nixon campaign contributions had been set aside to pay for an extensive undercover campaign aimed at discrediting individual Democratic presidential candidates and disrupting their campaigns.

        "Intelligence work" is normal during a campaign and is said to be carried out by both political parties. But federal investigators said what they uncovered being done by the Nixon forces is unprecedented in scope and intensity.

        They said it included:

        Following members of Democratic candidates' families and assembling dossiers on their personal lives; forging letters and distributing them under the candidates' letterheads; leaking false and manufactured items to the press; throwing campaign schedules into disarray; seizing confidential campaign files; and investigating the lives of dozens of Democratic campaign workers.

        In addition, investigators said the activities included planting provocateurs in the ranks of organizations expected to demonstrate at the Republican and Democratic conventions; and investigating potential donors to the Nixon campaign before their contributions were solicited.

        "

        Law enforcement sources said that probably the best example of the sabotage was the fabrication by a White House aide -- of a celebrated letter to the editor alleging that Sen. Edmund S. Muskie (D-Maine) condoned a racial slur on Americans of French-Canadian descent as "Canucks."

        The letter was published in the Manchester Union Leader Feb 24, less than two weeks before the New Hampshire primary. It in part triggered Muskie's politically damaging "crying speech" in front of the newspaper's office.

        Washington Post staff writer Marilyn Berger reported that Ken W. Clawson, deputy director of White House communications, told her in a conversation on September 25th that, "I wrote the letter."

        During their Watergate investigation, federal agents established that hundreds of thousands of dollars in Nixon campaign contributions had been set aside to pay for an extensive undercover campaign aimed at discrediting individual Democratic presidential candidates and disrupting their campaigns.

        "Intelligence work" is normal during a campaign and is said to be carried out by both political parties. But federal investigators said what they uncovered being done by the Nixon forces is unprecedented in scope and intensity.

        They said it included:

        Following members of Democratic candidates' families and assembling dossiers on their personal lives; forging letters and distributing them under the candidates' letterheads; leaking false and manufactured items to the press; throwing campaign schedules into disarray; seizing confidential campaign files; and investigating the lives of dozens of Democratic campaign workers.

        In addition, investigators said the activities included planting provocateurs in the ranks of organizations expected to demonstrate at the Republican and Democratic conventions; and investigating potential donors to the Nixon campaign before their contributions were solicited.

        Three attorneys have told The Washington Post that, as early as mid-1971, they were asked to work as agents provocateurs on behalf of the Nixon campaign. They said they were asked to undermine the primary campaigns of Democratic candidates by a man who has been identified in FBI reports as an operative of the Nixon re-election organization.

        All three lawyers, including one who is an assistant attorney general of Tennessee, said they turned down the offers, which purportedly included the promise of "big jobs" in Washington after President Nixon's re-election. They said the overtures were made by Donald H. Segretti, 31, a former Treasury Department lawyer who lives in Marina Del Ray, Calif.

        Segretti denied making the offers and refused to answer a reporter's questions.

        One federal investigative official said that Segretti played the role of "just a small fish in a big pond." According to FBI reports, at least 50 undercover Nixon operatives traveled throughout the country trying to disrupt and spy on Democratic campaigns.

        Both at the White House and within the President's re-election committee, the intelligence-sabotage operation was commonly called the "offensive security" program of the Nixon forces, according to investigators.

        Perhaps the most significant finding of the whole Watergate investigation, the investigators say, was that numerous specific acts of political sabotage and spying were all traced to this "offensive security," which was conceived and directed in the White House and by President Nixon's re-election committee.

    •  With food courts for the deserving (4+ / 0-)

      The rest can eat out of the dumpster buffet, as far as such... utopians are concerned.

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