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View Diary: A list of books (101 comments)

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  •  wow, poor statue (none)
    you have really eclectic reading tastes:) do you get books from the library, second hand store, book sharing group (we did that at my last school, everyone left their books in the lounge when they were done reading them),or are you rich:)

    Often, when I am reading a good book, I stop and thank my teacher. That is, I used to, until she got an unlisted number. --Student, Age 15

    by unemployedschoolcounselor on Tue Feb 01, 2005 at 07:24:13 PM PST

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    •  My local (none)
      bookstore has a book club type thing.  People give me lots of gift certificates for bookstores (cuz they know me).  I'm a pack rat.  I do frequent some discount bookstores (One of my favorite memories of childhood was our every couple of months trip to the local used bookstore where we could get all the books we wanted- I used to get about 20 at a time.  The whole family spent hours in there and usually spent about $40 total all on books that cost about 25 cents each.)

      But I confess, books are my weakness.  I don't buy clothes.  I don't buy shoes.  I don't get my nails done or any of those odd beauty rituals other girls love.  I don't go out to eat.  I don't go to the movies (or rent them). I don't drink much.  Every couple of months I spend about four hours shopping for $100 or so of books.  Over my 27 years I've built up quite a collection of books (I don't ever get rid of them though I occassionally lend them out.) My dream is to have a house with a small library in it.

      I started reading very young and never stopped.

      My old roommate used to joke with me because every time I got a new interest, I'd read every book I could get my hands on for a good 6 months or so.

      •  Okay (none)
        that comment looks all funny because of the bookstores, bookstores, bookstores.

        While I'm here I have to give a nod to all the Torey Hayden books. These are true stories of her work with special needs kids.  Her expertise is with elective mutism, but she works with all kinds of difficult children and the books are incredibly inspiring and heartwarming.

    •  I have discovered the secret to bookbuying (none)
      over here in the U.K.

      The trick is to haunt the thrift stores. You buy all the books that look interesting (because they're ridiculously cheap (20-70p each) and you also buy the books that aren't interesting to you (in my case, mostly crime) but have been bestsellers in the last couple of years. Then you take the latter to the market and sell them to the person on the bookstall, which near enough covers the cost of the other books you bought.
      (I'm desperately addicted to reading, haven't had much spare cash over the last year or so and have learned the hard way that I am simply incapable of returning library books on time)

      I have no country to fight for; my country is the earth and I am a citizen of the world -- Eugene Debs

      by dove on Tue Feb 01, 2005 at 07:40:19 PM PST

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      •  That's It (none)
        I'm moving.

        I'd like to say I go to the thrift stores a lot, but I don't.  I do get most of my fiction there, but the rest of the stuff I usually buy online.  After I exhausted the one shelf section of math books in my local bookstore (not a chain), I had to look elsewhere.  Plus, I have a lot of books about adoption and apparently no one in Massachusetts adopts babies or places them cuz I couldn't find anything!

        My future MIL gets all her books from the library.  She's so thrifty and responsible.  I love my books too much.  I'd never be able to let go.

        •  Yeah (none)
          thrift stores aren't much good for specialist topics.

          Many of my books are languishing in a garage (waterproof!) in the U.S. at the moment -- they're getting shipped out little by little. So I keep having these moments of 'Oh I want to read that. But I can't find it on my bookshelf! Where can it be? Oh, yeah, many, many, miles away.

          I have no country to fight for; my country is the earth and I am a citizen of the world -- Eugene Debs

          by dove on Tue Feb 01, 2005 at 07:57:02 PM PST

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          •  I understand (none)
            For the first time, I'm living with someone who appreciates my books.  Although the place is small, the hallway was built extra wide just for me so that we could line it with bookshelfs.  It's the first time in years all my books have been accessible.

            I love rediscovering them.

            Anyway, it's way past my bedtime and I have to teach tomorrow.  Thanks for giving me a chance to talk about one of my favorite things in the world.

      •  asdf (none)
        have learned the hard way that I am simply incapable of returning library books on time

        Me too. They almost crushed my left knee-cap.

        Europeans are to Americans what Greeks were to Romans. Educated slaves. - Luigi Barzini

        by Sirocco on Wed Feb 02, 2005 at 01:08:44 PM PST

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        •  Yeah (none)
          Came home and found a horse's skull on my bed with a 'final overdue' notice in its mouth. Figured it was probably time to take the hint =)

          I have no country to fight for; my country is the earth and I am a citizen of the world -- Eugene Debs

          by dove on Wed Feb 02, 2005 at 02:37:38 PM PST

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