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View Diary: A list of books (101 comments)

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  •  Well (none)
    I guess my absolute faves would include Coetzee's Disgrace (deserved Booker winner and probably a main reason why he got the Nobel); Kundera's truly amazing Immortality; and Borges' Labyrinths containing many of his most scintillating stories. None of the latter two has got a Nobel, which in my view almost invalidates the institution...

    I too have a penchant for SF, though I haven't read so much. In high school or possibly middle school I plowed through the entire Dune saga by Frank Herbert. Other favorites: Neuromancer (Gibson); The Mote in God's Eye (Niven/Pernelle); A Deepness in the Sky (Vinge); The Moon is a Harsh Mistress (Heinlein); The Chung Kuo series (Wingrove). The latter is quite absorbing but a huge investment in time. Fantasy - well, I played ADD & such when younger but apart from Tolkien, never really warmed to sword & sorcery. The Narnia series was great as a young kid. It strikes me how hard it is to remember any individual stories from that one; it's all a kind of dreamlike blur, which is probably how it's meant to be.

    Speaking of children's literature I always thought Astrid Lindgren pretty hard to match. It's almost a misnomer to call it children's books as if read in childhood they resonate throughout one's life.

    I've just barely glanced at the diaries. The day has only so many hours and all that. But it's a rather intriguing project, as you say. Though it would seem that if they ever really catch onto something it will be a drawback that 'the enemy' can follow developments in real time, and perhaps take steps now and then to eat the evidence.

    Anyhow, time for bed! Talk to you later.

    Europeans are to Americans what Greeks were to Romans. Educated slaves. - Luigi Barzini

    by Sirocco on Wed Feb 02, 2005 at 03:40:42 PM PST

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    •  By the way (none)
      The Master and Margarita is another must. I remember a few years ago, on a train from Szeged to Budapest, the guy sitting next to me professed to speak no English. Until, that is, I produced my copy of Bulgakov - then his English instantly improved! Literature promotes communication...

      Europeans are to Americans what Greeks were to Romans. Educated slaves. - Luigi Barzini

      by Sirocco on Wed Feb 02, 2005 at 03:54:28 PM PST

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