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View Diary: Can We Talk About Fatal Cases of Depression? (226 comments)

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  •  By the way (12+ / 0-)

    Realizing how irrational all of these feelings are, and how little evidence I have to support any of them was instrumental to me getting better.

    It simply hadn't occurred to me until someone suggested it that my feelings were lying to me. There was so much evidence that my friends liked me, and none that they didn't. So every time I'd get that same feeling, I'd ask myself, "So what is your evidence to back up this feeling?"

    Challenging these bad thoughts when they arise is a big step forward.

    •  Yeah, the doom. (7+ / 0-)

      It magnifies every little annoyance or task into a giant stumbling block.

      I actually try to visualize my brain and try to pick out a corner of it that I can designate as the rational spot and "go there" if I need to. Sometimes helps, sometimes the irrational is too overwhelming.

      Weenie liberals of the world unite! ...soccergrandmom

      by Giles Goat Boy on Thu Sep 23, 2010 at 02:46:34 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  asdf (7+ / 0-)

        The closest thing I ever felt was what I called "depressed to the point of paralysis."

        My mind was so clogged with contradictory feelings, guilts, and real-life responsibilities that I'd sit there and do nothing at all for fear of screwing up one way or another.

        I came eventually to think of my depressed, negative feelings as an entity. Even gave them a private name. Once I gave them a name, they became a target. Then I could fight them. Shout them down in the conference room of my mind.

        Heh. This may not make sense. But I'm telling about it because I think we all experience these things differently.

        •  so what did you do? (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          droogie6655321, kyril

          sounds like things are better now. What helped?

          To keep our faces turned toward change, and behave as free spirits in the presence of fate, that is strength undefeatable--Helen Keller

          by kareylou on Thu Sep 23, 2010 at 03:19:36 PM PDT

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          •  asdf (0+ / 0-)

            It's like I said. Recognizing the thoughts for what they are: Unrealistic, illogical, senseless, unhelpful, is what helps me let them pass by.

            It's something I learned from reading about Buddhism. When you're meditating and you come across a distracting thought, you acknowledge it and allow it to pass. You don't violently shove it away. You just say, "Hello, Sadness (or Depression, or Distraction). The door is over there."

            •  cool. (0+ / 0-)

              I meditate too; I belong to a sangha here in DC. I use a similar technique.  

              To keep our faces turned toward change, and behave as free spirits in the presence of fate, that is strength undefeatable--Helen Keller

              by kareylou on Fri Sep 24, 2010 at 10:20:51 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  p.s. (0+ / 0-)

              You had a way of describing it that was very helpful to me. Perhaps you would be willing to write a diary? About Buddhism/meditation?

              To keep our faces turned toward change, and behave as free spirits in the presence of fate, that is strength undefeatable--Helen Keller

              by kareylou on Fri Sep 24, 2010 at 10:21:35 AM PDT

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              •  I'm glad it was helpful (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                kareylou

                But I'm not really one to emulate! I'm not an expert on meditation at all. All I know is what I've read in books. Like Zen master Shunryo Suzuki or Thich Nhat Hanh. Those are two of my favorites.

                The problem-solving nature of Buddhism, the emphasis on cause and effect were instrumental for a lot of the progress I've made in the past 8 years or so. Applying these kinds of lessons, I've been able to get a handle on my anger and obtain a little degree of confidence, although these are still struggles for me.

                One insight is to realize that what you call your negative traits, whether they are anger or a lack of confidence or a tendency toward depression, are really just parts of yourself. You don't have to love these parts or hate them. You don't have to embrace or reject them. Just take notice of them. Know them. See them. Notice them. And if they are not helpful to you, let them pass.

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