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View Diary: "Bad Deal" Filibuster Liveblog 4 (392 comments)

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  •  Sherrod Brown was there too for a while. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Marie, gooderservice, Zwoof, Nespolo

    I think Sherrod Brown should primary Obama

    "Fighting for us, good. Winning, better. Talking about fighting? Not so good."--Atrios

    by andrewj54 on Fri Dec 10, 2010 at 01:09:06 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  He has to win his race first and primary Obama (0+ / 0-)

      won't help him  with the AA vote that he will need to win in Ohio in 2012.

      Republicans secret dream = the impeachment of Bo the Dog LOL

      by LaurenMonica on Fri Dec 10, 2010 at 01:11:51 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  That's a great idea. (0+ / 0-)

      President Obama's chief adviser: "I go to bed early. I can't stay awake for the returns... I gotta get up, work out."

      by gooderservice on Fri Dec 10, 2010 at 01:17:52 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Last five times a President (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LaurenMonica

      eligible for re-election was primaried, the other party won: 1952, 1968, 1976, 1980, 1992.

      The last time a President failed to win re-election without a competitive primary: 1932.

      Ponder that carefully before calling for a primary.

      •  Pro hoc ergo propria hoc (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        roadbear

        (if I've got it the right way around) isn't necessarily true.  Presidents about whom there is controversy and dissent within their own parties, are more likely to be primaried.  They're also more likely to lack support among the wider electorate.

        •  I believe you mean (0+ / 0-)

          "post hoc ergo propter hoc", and there's a small amount of legitimacy to the complaint, but it's also the case that primaries necessarily involve members of the party fighting each other rather than the other party, and spending money doing so. This is not helpful. Furthermore, it's very unlikely that any primary challenger can match the name-recognition advantage an incumbent President enjoys.

          When you have correlation combined with a likely causative mechanism, it becomes much more reasonable to assume there is some causative effect.

          Ask yourself this though: When was the last time a candidate defeated an incumbent in a primary, and went on to win the White House? 1876!

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