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View Diary: Lake Michigan Down By Over 5 Trillion Gallons This Year (139 comments)

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  •  The scenario described by Muskegon... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Powered Grace, DawnN

    ... is just another point in the constellation that is man-made climate change, that is what's news. The diarist expanded on that point from the view of someone intimately affected which is what good diaries do here, IMVHO.

    Taking all the singular events as a whole makes it news, record high Atlantic sea temps (can't cite more right now, just got my first cup of coffee but there are those here who can ;-) and a lot more.

    To go on ad nauseam, all over the US the aquifers and surface fresh water is being depleted while being replenished at nearly the same rate, and with weather patterns changing, that makes this even more uncertain.

    As for the weather, climate change brings even more unpredictability and bouts of extreme conditions, which makes the forecaster's task even more difficult, so your mistrust of predictions may be appropriate :-)

    Taking each issue and "refuting" it is not an effective argument when everything must be taken into account together.

    •  Follow the links... (2+ / 0-)
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      vlajos, highacidity

      The water levels fluctuate around a long term mean that seems pretty stable.

      There is plenty of evidence of global climate change -- I just don't see any that links it to low levels of water in the Great Lakes.  

      {This Space Intentionally Left Blank}

      by DaveV on Tue Dec 14, 2010 at 06:16:33 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I understand what you're saying... (0+ / 0-)

        ... and I did read the links before I made my reply earlier. Yes, there is a history of fluctuations of many types in the environment, but even so, I see it as connected with climate change, which I suppose we'll see as the decades pass.

        I am not a climate scientist, though. This particular commenter's MO is to "refute" a big issue by parsing a tiny slice of it, BTW.

        Thanks for the reply.

    •  That's not true (0+ / 0-)

      To go on ad nauseam, all over the US the aquifers and surface fresh water is being depleted while being replenished at nearly the same rate, and with weather patterns changing, that makes this even more uncertain.

      Aquifers are not being depleted "all over the US."  Certainly, there are areas of overdraft, but there also are areas where water levels are stable or rebounding.

      Here's a map from the USGS showing current water levels compared to historical norms.  While there are scattered red and brown dots (lower water levels) there also are a lot of blue and green ones indicating normal to high water levels.  

      •  That's a good link, thanks. (0+ / 0-)

        The number of normal and even blue above normal wells is good to see. I stand partially corrected on this.

        The number of red/brown dots and wells not ranked are enough to concern me, maybe because I'm a native westerner who grew up with the water arguments always playing in the background.

        •  Well, I'm a hydrogeologist (1+ / 0-)
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          highacidity

          And I commonly see people pessimistically stating that aquifers are drying up all over the place when it isn't the case.  There certainly are local problems and even special cases with regional aquifers like the Ogallala Aquifer where aquifer overdraft is a major problem, but groundwater supplies are in pretty good shape in most of the nation.

          I also live in the west - I used to do water resource work in Nevada.  Water is a bit of a contentious issue there, as you might imagine.

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