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View Diary: Republicans set to support 9/11 bill Updated2x (278 comments)

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  •  IMO, the third segment, (10+ / 0-)

    with Huckabee saying that a dear friend, a Texan, worked at Ground Zero for months and is now dying, is perhaps as important as the first two.

    Plus, Huckabee said there ought to be 25, 35, 45 Republicans supporting this bill.

    A public option for health insurance is a national priority.

    by devtob on Sat Dec 18, 2010 at 10:04:53 PM PST

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    •  Huckabee is a loon (9+ / 0-)

      but he has am actually functional beating heart. For this reason, he will never win a Republican primary. I looked at Free Republic and Red State today to see how they were taking the DADT news and got distracted by their presidential polling. Palin is WAY out in front, but even these loony sites are pushing Pence (no charisma) and someone named Herman Cain, who I've never heard of. He's a poll frontrunner, so perhaps we should figure out who he is.

      All goes onward and outward. . . .and nothing collapses, And to die is different from what any one supposed, and luckier

      by kat68 on Sat Dec 18, 2010 at 10:24:46 PM PST

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      •  kat68 (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        devtob, BruinKid

        I think the polling for Herman Cain was a collected 'anyone but Palin' effort by the freepers and staters to piss off the Palinbots.

        I was reading some of their comments, they are funnier than dogs skidding on ice over there.

        makes me feel all orange alerty - Laurence Lewis 12.7.10.

        by AnnetteK on Sun Dec 19, 2010 at 02:43:53 AM PST

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      •  Cain is from Georgia (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        devtob, BruinKid

        He's a former businessman (he ran some pizza chain and worked as an executive for Burger King and some other fast food chains) and is now a right wing talk show host.

        He ran for US Senate from Georgia the year Isaakson was first elected, but came in second in the primary.

        He is African-American.

        Cain was a real tea-bagger before tea-bagging was popular.

        He apparently has been on the lecture circuit saying he is thinking about running for the Republican presidential nomination in 2012. While he might do okay in an on-line poll of hard right activists, he isn't a serious threat for the nomination. Don't waste any time worrying about him.

        Once social change begins,it cannot be reversed. You cannot uneducate the person who has learned to read...You cannot oppress people who are not afraid anymore.

        by terjeanderson on Sun Dec 19, 2010 at 04:43:02 AM PST

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        •  In other words he's (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          devtob, BruinKid, OIL GUY, BoxNDox

          Georgian for "Alan Keyes".

          "They don't think it be like it is, but it do. " Oscar Gamble, circa 1980

          by Spider Stumbled on Sun Dec 19, 2010 at 05:44:06 AM PST

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          •  Not quite as crazy (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            devtob, BruinKid, JVolvo

            Yes, he's African-American like Keyes, but while is conservative, he is not as much of a complete paranoid extremist loon - he's just run of the mill right wing Republican extremist. I understand he has some moderate positions - he backs some forms of affirmative action for example. Cain is primarily an economic conservative in terms of the issues he focuses on, while Keyes is focused on culture war issues-- for example, Cain at one point head was head of the National Restaurant Association and spent a lot of time fighting things like Clinton's healthcare proposal and increasing the minimum wage.

            A better example might be John Cox -- he was an Illinois (white) businessman who ran unsuccessfully for Congress and Senate before, and then spent a couple of million of his own money trying to run in the Iowa Republican caucuses in 2008, but ended up withdrawing after he went nowhere. The same kind of vanity campaign, and the same kind of "the country needs a businessman in charge" message.

            Once social change begins,it cannot be reversed. You cannot uneducate the person who has learned to read...You cannot oppress people who are not afraid anymore.

            by terjeanderson on Sun Dec 19, 2010 at 08:15:48 AM PST

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      •  I also checked out RedState and FR (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        devtob, BruinKid, SottoVoce

        for the same reason.

        Unless things have changed since last night--not a PEEP about DADT on RedState.  Pretty amusing.

        Notably, they were able to blame the Democrats for the failure of the DREAM act to make it through the cloture vote.

        Real science is rarely done by petition. --John R. Mashey

        by Naniboujou on Sun Dec 19, 2010 at 04:50:12 AM PST

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      •  but his math is off... what a surprise (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        devtob, BruinKid, sustainable

        45 repubublicans in the Senate?  Does he know something about Nelson, Lieberman, et al.  we don't?

        "They really don't want to 'win' the war; they just want to have one."
        -- DelicateMonster

        by 8ackgr0und N015e on Sun Dec 19, 2010 at 06:22:49 AM PST

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    •  Throwing the tax cut bomb seemed to work for (6+ / 0-)

      the hot agenda items, then. Until O did that, indicated that if they wouldn't go forward on anything he would, the will to fight for anything had gone out of the Dems. Now they're wide awake, and lo and behold, good things are finally happening.

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