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View Diary: There is no generational divide on Social Security (127 comments)

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  •  Every generation has its (8+ / 0-)

    heroes and its shitheads.   As far as greed, every generation has its accumulator of vast wealth.  We (boomers) have Gates.  They (whippersnappers) have Zuckerberg.  Our parents had the Rockefellers, Mellons and duPonts.  Our grandparents had Joe Kennedy.  Our great-grandparents had Andrew Carnegie.

    Personally, I'm way past tired of boomer-bashing.  I apologize for GW Bush, okay?  Damn.  But trust me, GenX will produce its own Dubya.  Hell, they probably already have.  Every generation has one of those, too.  Our parents had Nixon, our grandparents had Coolidge.  And on it goes.

    I'm proud to be a boomer.  I'm proud to have lived during the sixties - even though I was too young to do the really fun stuff like go to Woodstock.  I'm proud to have been a witness to what happened back then.  

    All you whippersnappers who agree with Former Senator and Present-Day Asshole Simpson that we are the greediest generation can kiss my ass.  One of these days there'll be a generation coming behind you that will think you suck, too, and it's gonna happen sooner than you think.

    Now, if you excuse me I think I'm going to go listen to some Grateful Dead.

    Obama, 2008: "Yes We Can!"
    Obama, 2010: "No, I Won't!"

    by Mehitabel9 on Sun Dec 19, 2010 at 07:36:29 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  We're now called the Jones Generation (0+ / 0-)

      who were children during all the happenings of the 1960s.

      It's not just a zip code, it's an attitude.

      by sboucher on Sun Dec 19, 2010 at 08:21:20 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Not as in Jim Jones? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sboucher

        And the People's Temple?  Ugh.

        Obama, 2008: "Yes We Can!"
        Obama, 2010: "No, I Won't!"

        by Mehitabel9 on Sun Dec 19, 2010 at 08:24:05 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  No no LOL (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Zack from the SFV, BYw

          As in, we're jonesing to belong to one generation or another, but we're kind of trapped in the middle; another silent generation, if you will. We were too young for Woodstock, but had brothers being drafted; we were children during the assassinations, the riots, aware but powerless. There's many articles/videos about it, when the term came into use several years ago.

          It's not just a zip code, it's an attitude.

          by sboucher on Sun Dec 19, 2010 at 08:34:16 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I guess I wasn't paying much attention (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            sboucher

            at the time somebody came up with that term.

            The year I was 8, that Thanksgiving my parents hosted a couple of young Army recruits (well, draftees) who'd just finished basic training and were going to shortly be sent to Vietnam for Thanksgiving dinner.  It was part of a local USO effort.

            They came in their dress uniforms and yes-ma'am my mother and yes-sirred my father, and I can still remember being in total awe of them.

            Looking back now - they were, at most, 18 or 19 years old.

            Just thinking about it all these years later makes my eyes fill with tears.  I no longer remember their names nor do I have the slightest idea whatever happened to them.

            Obama, 2008: "Yes We Can!"
            Obama, 2010: "No, I Won't!"

            by Mehitabel9 on Sun Dec 19, 2010 at 08:43:58 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  people born between 1954 and 1965 (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Zack from the SFV, BYw, lostinamerica

              Jonesers were given huge expectations as children in the 1960s, and then confronted with a different reality as they came of age in the 1970s and 1980s, leaving them with a certain unrequited, jonesing quality.
              Wiki

              It's not just a zip code, it's an attitude.

              by sboucher on Sun Dec 19, 2010 at 09:49:04 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Talkin' About My Generation (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                BYw, lostinamerica, sboucher

                  I don't care much for the name "Jones Generation" but the later Boomers are different from the earlier ones and have mostly been ignored in discussions of the Boomers, as if all Boomers are "Clintonsomething" (born in the late '40s). Maybe that is why we need a name for our cohorts. I remember a lot of the Sixties from my childhood (born in '58) but sometimes feel like I missed out on a lot of the fun and excitement of that time. On the other hand it was advantageous to be only 14 when the U.S. got out of the Viet Nam War. For a while in the early '70s with Nixon I thought it still might be going on when I was old enough for the draft. Because I was born before 1960 I am not subject to the Selective Service Registration system that younger men must comply with. So perhaps the late '50s was a good time to be born after all.

                   Getting back to the topic of the diary, late boomers are also in the phaseout range between SSA full retirement ages 65 to 67. 1958ers have the unique retirement age of two-thirds of a century (66 years 8 months). People born in 1960 or later have 67 as their full retirement age. 67 is plenty old for retirement benefits; that number should not be raised.

                I'm not a Limousine Liberal; I am a Prius Progressive

                by Zack from the SFV on Sun Dec 19, 2010 at 11:53:25 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  I would have no problem (5+ / 0-)

                  working till age 67 or even 70, except who employs people that age anymore except as WalMart greeters?

                  There's a big gap out there that nobody talks about.  It's the people who are anywhere from their late forties on up who get downsized out of their jobs and can't find another because there is a very real and very big problem in this country with age discrimination.

                  But they can't collect Social Security till they are in their late sixties.

                  What the hell are all these people supposed to do for the intervening twenty years?  There just aren't enough WalMarts to go around.

                  I know a few people who are in this exact situation.  But they are, in the larger context of our society, completely invisible.  I suspect that a significant portion of the 99ers who are currently being left twisting in the wind by the Obama Administration fall into this demographic.

                  Obama, 2008: "Yes We Can!"
                  Obama, 2010: "No, I Won't!"

                  by Mehitabel9 on Mon Dec 20, 2010 at 07:53:40 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Mehitabel9 thank you (2+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    Zack from the SFV, BYw

                    for pointing out the age discrimination thing, cause that's where I am.

                    Unemployed since April 2007, almost 54 years old and no one wants to give me time of day let alone a job.

                    I want to work so bad, it's humiliating.

                    And yeah, I fear that Obama is taking everything away before I get a dime of what I've paid into it, so there is a disconnect.

                    DC pols are gonna take us all to cleaners.

    •  I'm also proud to be a boomer. (0+ / 0-)

      I'm bashing our parent's generation...the people we grew up working for...the people who have always sought to destroy the unions.

      •  Yeah because the soldiers (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mimi9, jaysunb

        coming home from war in 1945, a couple of years before you were born spent their whole lives bashing unions instead of joining them.

        Buy a fricking  calender and  a four function calculator. If you have to blame a generation blame the one in between your parents and you, the ones often called the Silent Generation, too young to actually fight in the war but who sucked up all the advantages of growing up in the fifties and early sixties when advancement into the Middle Class was seemingly open to all. (If you were white). But unless your parents were in sixth grade when you were born you are barking up the wrong generational tree.

      •  You got it totally backward (4+ / 0-)

        Unions were at their most powerful when your parents' generation was in charge (in the 50's and 60's).

        Unions went downhill afterward, including as long as your generation has been in charge.

        There is a case to be made that your parents' generation was significantly more left-wing on economic matters than yours. They actually grew up in economic depression, and they understood how difficult it was to be poor and how important it was to have a strong, prosperous middle class with minimal class differences. Your generation, on the other hand, grew up in the most prosperous period in our nation's history and took the middle-class lifestyle and relative class equality for granted.

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