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View Diary: White House prepares executive order for indefinite detention (288 comments)

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  •  None. The question never came up. (0+ / 0-)

    First, we were at war with their countries not their thoughts.  Second, virtually all combatants wore uniforms; those who didn't were held because we were - as noted above - at war with their countries, not their thoughts.

    For a better picture of how we treated "combatants" during WWII, look up the term Manzanar.  It might make you proud.  It should make you disgusted.

    "We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -Ben Franklin

    by IndieGuy on Wed Dec 22, 2010 at 09:16:02 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  Your ignorance is showing (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PsychoSavannah

      For a better picture of how we treated "combatants" during WWII, look up the term Manzanar.  It might make you proud.  It should make you disgusted.

      Manzanar was a detention camp for Japanese Americans.

      They were not alleged to be enemy combatants.

      •  No shit, Sherlock. They were INNOCENT. (0+ / 0-)

        Pay attention!

        "We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -Ben Franklin

        by IndieGuy on Wed Dec 22, 2010 at 09:33:03 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Innocent of what? (0+ / 0-)

          They were accused of being of Japanese ancestry, not ov being combatants or spies.

          I'm not aware of claims that people who were not of Japanese ancestry were also thrown in the camps.

          Issue here wasn't innocence.

          It was whether or not Japanese ancestry was a valid justification for putting people in camps.

    •  There is actually ample precedent (0+ / 0-)

      for holding combatants who are not fighting for countries.

      Simple examples include North Koreans (we did not recognize North Korea as a country) and Confederate prisoners.

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