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View Diary: ABC/WaPo: 78% Approval For Obama on Tucson; Palin not so much (144 comments)

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  •  The other 22% boycotted his AZ speech (12+ / 0-)

    I guarantee it.  

    Saw a few Facebook comments about this while he was giving the speech.  They were so mad that the crowd cheered the Obamas when they entered the stadium, that they didn't even watch his speech.

    What else could possibly be the reason - other than irrational hatred - for disapproving of his response?  It hit all the right notes and was not in any way controversial.

    The nose of a mob is its imagination. By this, at any time, it can be quietly led. -- Edgar Allan Poe

    by Sarea on Mon Jan 17, 2011 at 03:48:37 PM PST

    •  It's the segment of the population that (10+ / 0-)

      believes that the scary black guy is going to knock on their door and say, "Hand over your bibles and all your guns."  It's those guys.

      •  It's much more than he being teh black (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        edsbrooklyn, mayim, aufklaerer

        Hold on got a diary that kinda sums this one up

        A[n] urbane, well-educated, well-off, well-spoken, forward-looking son of a recent immigrant who did not share the country-boy-can-survive ethos would have been a tough sell in the most affable of Appalachian moods. Once it was pointed out, frequently, that Barack Obama just happened to be black, deep cultural resentments, the ancient rivalry of poor whites against all African-Americans but especially the highly successful ones, were fanned back to prominence.

        This is not racism so much as resentment made easy to focus; that so many groups and regions have prospered but Appalachia has been left high and dry...that it is of Appalachia's own, long-reasserted choice is not the point. The point is, well, looks like you need our votes this year...and we haven't decided if there is a price we even want to ask for our support, as far as you are concerned.

        Oh, and the money shot - and I turned out to have called it perfectly (not something I am very proud of either):

        The lasting danger is this is not a switch that can be turned on and off; it is an axe to the tree of civility, a possibly mortal wound that the Clinton campaign has delivered. The likely lasting consequence is to turn Appalachia into a solidly Republican bastion for the next two generations because of this stunt, forcing the Democrats to choose whether to compete on conservatism in the states containing this region or to shake it off and migrate their support and message elsewhere, most likely westward, where the future of America has been heading all along.

        Ideally, the Appalachia region is brought into the Third Millennium with the rest of us, but history long before the arrival of the British set the pattern in play - that once the Scots found their new mountains, they were never going to let go of their ways, good and bad alike. It has forged a special strength in this people...but many tragic tales are played out as strife among the strong. It does not mean that both are right; it just means a fight is going to happen.

        I hold the Clintons responsible for this fight. I do not think they are even aware of just how dangerous a match that they have lit by this.

        That was May 2008.

        It has played out as if to a script since then - not just civility's death between the major parties.

        But within them as well.

        Why can't we all just get a blog? :)

        by cskendrick on Mon Jan 17, 2011 at 05:05:16 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

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