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View Diary: Stonyfield Farms using GMOs (146 comments)

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  •  No, they aren't (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pontechango, indubitably

    They can't say that due to the production of the PLA. That's why they are buying the offsets. You can see their explanation of it.

    But as I also pointed out, using GMOs to reduce tractor usage and chemical inputs is a benefit.

    They assess it thus:
    http://www.stonyfield.com/...

    His analysis compared Ingeo PLA to Polystyrene (PS) over the life cycle of the container, which is referred to as "cradle to grave." The study found that the PLA uses less energy and releases lower greenhouse gas emissions than PS over its lifecycle. Since PLA is made from corn, which captures carbon as it grows, it releases 48% less carbon than PS releases into the atmosphere throughout its entire lifecycle.

    For Stonyfield, this means that by using the plant-based plastic instead of PS for our multipacks, we will reduce our carbon footprint by 1,875 metric tons of CO2 a year. That’s equal to the CO2 emissions from 4,360 barrels of oil, or the greenhouse gases from the energy used in 160 homes for an entire year.

    In fact, this one change in packaging reduces the total global warming impact of Stonyfield’s packaging by 9%.

    They link to their study of it on that page too.

    Darwinic pilgrims claim the image fills them with an overwhelming feeling of logic. --The Onion

    by mem from somerville on Sun Jan 23, 2011 at 08:16:29 AM PST

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    •  Carbon offsets aren't particularly legit (0+ / 0-)

      in the big picture.  But I can appreciate the comparison to PS on carbon capture.

      We meant to do better, but it came out as always. -- Viktor Chernomyrdin

      by pontechango on Sun Jan 23, 2011 at 08:21:11 AM PST

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    •  As is doing the same stuff without the GMOs. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      corvo, Leo in NJ

      I like what Stoneyfield is doing here, but much of what is touted as benefits of GMOs, like no-till, predate GMOs and doesn't require them.

      That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt -

      by enhydra lutris on Sun Jan 23, 2011 at 10:17:55 AM PST

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      •  No, it doesn't require them (0+ / 0-)

        and it's funny--a lot of people who wail about GMOs have little grasp that the things they are actually wailing about are business and logistics issues around farming and not about GMOs.

        But for many reasons farmers are using GMOs at very high rates. They aren't stupid, so there must be benefits for them.

        But I also love to see the Amish using GMOs:
        Amish farmers embrace GM crops.

        Darwinic pilgrims claim the image fills them with an overwhelming feeling of logic. --The Onion

        by mem from somerville on Sun Jan 23, 2011 at 10:22:15 AM PST

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        •  asdf (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          corvo

          But for many reasons farmers are using GMOs at very high rates. They aren't stupid, so there must be benefits for them.

          Though the benefits may have been overhyped and the farmers may have been conned to some degree. For corporate industrial agriculture, however, they are probably the way to go

          That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt -

          by enhydra lutris on Sun Jan 23, 2011 at 11:26:03 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Organic no-till requires a more (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mem from somerville

        time on tractors (more diesel). That's what farmers love about RR corn. One pass and your done.

        "Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons."

        by the fan man on Sun Jan 23, 2011 at 11:38:49 AM PST

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        •  Not necessrily. One pass with a seed drill is one (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          the fan man

          pass with a seed drill.

          That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt -

          by enhydra lutris on Sun Jan 23, 2011 at 03:20:23 PM PST

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          •  Not what I've read, but I'm open to more info. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            mem from somerville

            Rodale No-Till Revolution
            There were issues with cutworms and other critters that loved the mulch laid down by no til organic. When you consider what farmers were doing before Roundup, it was a step forward. Organic requires a very different set of protocols.

            "Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons."

            by the fan man on Sun Jan 23, 2011 at 03:30:57 PM PST

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            •  asdf (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              the fan man

              Rodale doesn't necessarily have all of the answers any more than Monsanto and DOW do. A lot depends on the crop and cover crop, on crop alternation, etc. Some folks have even used a modified paddock system following a grain or other crop with cattle (dairy or beef, grazing stubble and cover crop) before the next crop, on short rotations. There is also the whole thing with beneficial insects and providing reservoirs for them.

              You'll notice in the Rodale video that they strive for one pass kill of the cover crop and planting by doing one on each end of the tractor. You'll also notice that they ae using rye grass as a cover crop and a planter which creates a furrow, drops n a seed and then re=closes it. A lot of the early stuff I recall in CA used low growing cover crops and simply punched the seeds right through it with seed drills. I think this may depend on whether or not the idea is simply to plant corn, year after year after year versus whether or not there is any crop alternation, but I am far from expert and don't know all the details, other than that it was not a multi-pass operation to plant. and could be as simple as one pass to harvest at harvest time and another to plant come planting season.

              IIRC U.C.Davis, California Dept of Ag. and other parts of the UC System and maybe some Oregon resources were onto this back as eaarly as the seventies.

              That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt -

              by enhydra lutris on Sun Jan 23, 2011 at 07:58:09 PM PST

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              •  Thanks, I'm not an expert either. We need more (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                enhydra lutris

                research $ invested into alternatives to the current crop of herbicides. There are some very interesting herbicides based on naturally occurring compounds, not having to apply herbicides would be even better. Low input/sustainable will be the future.

                "Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons."

                by the fan man on Mon Jan 24, 2011 at 04:48:15 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

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