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View Diary: Richard III and the Princes in the Tower (w/poll) (118 comments)

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  •  Phillipa Gregory hints… (0+ / 0-)

    at Warbeck actually being York. In her book The White Queen she has Richard being smuggled out of Westminster when it becomes clear she was going to have to give him up to Gloucester. She gets a changeling in to impersonate York who then goes to the Tower in his stead. Gregory later introduces "Perkin" as a code name in her letters to and from York while he is allegedly in hiding on the continent.

    My daughter read the book before I did, and sort of gave me a running account (or asked periodic background questions) as she's painfully aware of my obsession with British history. When she mentioned the "Perkin" ploy, I immediately recognized what Gregory was doing.

    •  The White Queen is fiction (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cartoon Peril

      And Gregory is not known for writing accurate historical fiction - see The Other Boleyn Girl.

    •  There is a book by Ann Wroe called (0+ / 0-)

      The Perfect Prince, a biography of Perkin Warbeck, which I am reading now.  It's a bit long-winded for my taste.

      It is remotely possible that Perkin Warbeck may have been a bastard of Edward IV.

      You have exactly 10 seconds to change that look of disgusting pity into one of enormous respect!

      by Cartoon Peril on Sat Jan 29, 2011 at 10:46:41 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I've read that too (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Cartoon Peril

        Wroe goes back and forth on the "Was he or wasn't he? question without ever definitively answering it, and then almost at the end of the entire tome tosses in that tidbit as a "maybe".

        Notice, though, how strongly Margaret of Burgundy (nee York) figures into it.

        If it's
        Not your body
        Then it's
        Not your choice
        AND it's
        None of your damn business!

        by TheOtherMaven on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:56:37 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Wroe's writing style is rather wordy (0+ / 0-)

          I am suspicious of the "confession" that Henry Tudor had Warbeck read.  Of all the scenarios, the notion that the older boy would be killed while the younger one somehow spared seems least likely to me.

          But it seem like there is an outside chance that Warbeck could have been a bastard of Edward IV, as the timing of his birth roughly fits Edward's stay in Flanders.  This certainly wouldn't have been the first adultery that Edward committed.  This would explain Warbeck's similarity in looks to Edward, and also the fact of his birth in Flanders and all his Flemish relatives.

          You have exactly 10 seconds to change that look of disgusting pity into one of enormous respect!

          by Cartoon Peril on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 08:54:49 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

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