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View Diary: Regulation is born from fire (82 comments)

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  •  Yup. That's how humans are. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cybersaur, koNko, papicek

    After Hurricane Andrew, building codes were changed so that homes could actually withstand hurricane force winds: hurricane straps instead of clips; a lot more rebar, nails instead of staples on roofs. Many of us who flew to FL for Andrew were shocked how crappy most of those houses were built. Many houses that survived weren't really well built. They just weren't completely substandard.

    After wildfires in California during the last decade, numerous jurisdictions opted to require sprinklers in rebuilt residences and new construction. Other building code items from type of siding to roof overhang to bans of wooden patio roofing,  and even gutter requirements were tightened up as well. The goal is as fire resistant a structure as possible. Citizens and firefighters were injured and killed in those fires.

    Whether it's firestops in apartment building attics or bans on cedar shake and shingle roofing, almost every regulation involving building codes and safety arose from unspeakable tragedy.

    We ALWAYS close the barn door after the horse is gone.

     

    It was the best of times, it was the worst of times... - C Dickens.

    by grover on Sun Mar 06, 2011 at 11:36:46 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  on reflection... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      grover

      it's hard to fault our practice of letting the roof cave in, because if it doesn't cave, there's no problem, right?

      Trouble is, when we know the roof's going to go, say with climate change and what that'll do to the world's food supply, or building codes in places where we know violent storms like to appear, we still wait until the catastrophe hits.

      There ought to be a way to deal with these things rationally. Prioritize the problems and deal with them.

      Sorry. My bad. I'm asking people to be rational when it's all too apparent they'd rather gamble.

      "The cure for bullshit is fieldwork."
      Robert H. Bates, Eaton Professor of the Science of Government, Harvard University.

      by papicek on Mon Mar 07, 2011 at 07:40:24 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  When you said "roof cave in," my first thought (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        papicek

        is all those buildings where the firefighters opted to simply defend the neighboring structure because it was too dangerous to fight the one on fire. But the property owner (often the guy who negligent or reckless to begin with)  is furious because "they didn't do anything!" to save him from complete and utter loss.

        I've had neighbors ask us why we have an ADT alarm system. When I explain that the burglar alarm is handy (we live in a  safe neighborhood) but that what what we really wanted was the hardwired smoke/heat detection system that summons the fire department  automatically, the comments have varied from "sounds expensive" (when i never said how much it costs) to "we're not alarm people."

        Climate change is simply the house fire that we know is coming. But people are offering the same lame excuses, mostly denial that it will happen to them. Of course, if we dealt with the "house fire" of climate change, we'd get the "burglar alarm" for homeland security as part of the package. But Americans are not alarm people, apparently.

        It was the best of times, it was the worst of times... - C Dickens.

        by grover on Mon Mar 07, 2011 at 10:57:43 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  "we're not alarm people" (0+ / 0-)

          is a perfect illustration of those too lazy or dumb to take care of themselves. Or their families. They'd rather gamble.

          Hardwiring can be expensive. But, I'll bet you get a break on your home insurance because of it. (See what I mean about lazy?) There's more to the story than the initial costs, but they aren't interested.

          As long as they've got a ball game to watch they feel they're on top of things.

          "The cure for bullshit is fieldwork."
          Robert H. Bates, Eaton Professor of the Science of Government, Harvard University.

          by papicek on Mon Mar 07, 2011 at 04:26:31 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

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