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View Diary: Connecticut's Death Penalty: Justice Delayed, Not Denied (9 comments)

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  •  CT still has a death penalty because... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Prinny Squad

    ...every once in a while, Connecticut has people who deserve to die for what they've done.  Please understand that there are people who are as offended by the idea of the Cheshire killers or Michael Ross not being executed for their crimes as you are by the prospect or reality of their execution.  You don't necessarily win.

    It's better to curse the darkness than light a candle. --Whoever invented blogs, c.1996

    by Rich in PA on Thu May 12, 2011 at 11:30:38 AM PDT

    •  I agree that they "deserve" to die (0+ / 0-)

      But I can't countenance the state having the right to kill them.  Not when we might make a mistake.

      Numbers are like people . . . Torture them enough and they'll tell you anything.

      by Actuary4Change on Thu May 12, 2011 at 01:13:11 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I never understood this objection. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Prinny Squad

        Why should it apply to cases where there is literally no possibility of a mistake?  In the cases I've cited, there is absolutely no possibility that the people convicted of the crimes didn't do it, and precisely in the terms alleged by the state.  On what basis should their punishment be impacted by the fact that in other cases, there is indeed some possibility?  It just makes no sense.

        It's better to curse the darkness than light a candle. --Whoever invented blogs, c.1996

        by Rich in PA on Thu May 12, 2011 at 01:37:08 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  How do you find these cases? (0+ / 0-)

          What is the higher standard of proof than "beyond a reasonable doubt?

          I'm not saying that we couldn't find one, but it would be tricky.  

          I'm personally against the death penalty in all cases because I do not think that the state should be in the business of taking a life, but at the point where we could come up with sufficient guarantees that we were not executing the innocent, and we could get the trials done in a way that was actually less expensive for the state than life imprisonment, I'd stop thinking of it as a very important issue for me.

          Numbers are like people . . . Torture them enough and they'll tell you anything.

          by Actuary4Change on Fri May 13, 2011 at 09:58:20 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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