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View Diary: Would a little American nuclear emergency make you look up? We're having one (225 comments)

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  •  Turkey Point took a direct hit ... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Adept2u

    ... from Hurricane Andrew.

    No significant damage.

    •  Big difference between a tornado and a hurricane (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Adept2u

      Tornadoes appear rapidly and with focused intensity, hurricanes on the other hand give plenty of warning.

      Turkey Point required 8 hours for an orderly shutdown and they began shutting it  down 12 hours before the storm hit.

      You don't get 8 hours warning with a tornado and in many case you might have no more than 15 minutes if you are lucky.

      Turkey Points containment vessel stayed in tact as did Fukushima's but they also suffered significant damage to out side facilities as did Fukushima's reactors also... but not to the same extent.

      From a report in a letter written by Brian K. Grimes, Director, Division of Operating Reactor Support, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation:

      Hurricane Andrew is historic because this is the first time that a hurricane significantly affected a commercial nuclear power plant. The eye of the storm, with sustained winds of up to 233 kilometers per hour (km/h) [145 miles per hour (mph)] and gusts of 282 km/h (175 mph), passed over the Turkey Point site and caused extensive onsite and offsite damage.

      The onsite damage included loss of all offsite power for more than 5 days, complete loss of communication systems, closing of the access road, and damage to the fire protection and security systems and warehouse facilities. However, despite the intensity of the hurricane and the age of the plant, onsite damage was limited to fire protection, security, and several non-safety-related systems and structures. There was no damage to the safety-related systems except for minor water intrusion and some damage to insulation and paint, and there was no radioactive release to the environment. The units
      remained in a stable condition and functioned as designed.

      Snip!

      Turkey Point procedures for timing of a plant shutdown in anticipation of a hurricane require that the plant be in at least Mode 4 (i.e., hot shutdown) 2 hours before the onset of hurricane-force winds at the site.

      Estimating 8 hours to complete an orderly shutdown, the licensee began a plant shutdown approximately 12 hours before the predicted landfall of the hurricane. As a result, both units were in Mode 4 when Hurricane Andrew struck.

      Snip!

      Additionally, at Turkey Point (and at other commercial reactors susceptible to hurricane damage), important equipment (e.g., auxiliary feedwater) is located outside and likely would not be accessible during a hurricane.

      Snip!

      During the storm, failed nonsafety-grade equipment damaged certain important equipment. For example, the high water tank collapsed onto the fire water system, rendering the fire protection system inoperable.

      In addition, the storm threatened safety-related equipment (e.g., potential collapse of the damaged Unit 1 chimney onto the diesel generator building).

      More...

      http://eyeonmiami.blogspot.com/...

      •  Why didn't you highlight this section? (0+ / 0-)
        There was no damage to the safety-related systems except for minor water intrusion and some damage to insulation and paint, and there was no radioactive release to the environment. The units
        remained in a stable condition and functioned as designed.

        Seems more important than the condition of an access road.

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