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View Diary: WA-Gov: Gregoire won't seek third term (91 comments)

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  •  What most lower 48-ians don't realize (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Christopher Walker

    is how far north we are. Our entire state is farther north than Minneapolis, and most of it is farther north than Bismark.

    It gets DARK here in the winter. The sun rises late, sets early, and in Western WA, "sun" means dark gray clouds, not a bright orb in the sky.

    Most of the transplants  I know have a hard time getting used to it. They don't realize they get more light outside even in heavy rain than inside. So they really struggle.

    Many move back.

    It's not so much the climate. It's the latititude. Us and Maine. Way up here.  

    But I don't complain. I've done a lot of travel to Alaska in the winter. Now that's a bit dark.

    (Ok, I do complain, by late February, I get kind of whiny. If  I lived in Alaska, I'd have a Permanent Fund check and I could be travelling to somewhere sunny.)

    © grover. "Buy! Buy!" says the sign in the shop window. "Why? Why?" says the junk in the yard. -- John Denver

    by grover on Mon Jun 13, 2011 at 05:18:56 PM PDT

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    •  Thanks to the Lambert Conformal Conic projection.. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      AspenFern, grover, thetadelta

      Everyone seems to think Maine is the northernmost of the contiguous United States - but Portland, Oregon, is actually to the north of Portland, Maine! The thing that really blows my mind, though, is that Seattle is north of St. John's, Newfoundland. That's just bizarre.

      Independent, Auckland Central resident, MD-05 voter, OR-01 native, Swingnut for life, and keeper of the DKE glossary.

      by SaoMagnifico on Mon Jun 13, 2011 at 07:23:10 PM PDT

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      •  I thought this was cool: (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SaoMagnifico
        The cool thing about Latitude 47 is that it encircles the Earth like a sweatband at about eyebrow level (if the globe were a head), tying Seattle and Spokane to Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia and every other spot on Earth the same distance from the equator and poles.

        /snip

        Places are parallel. But not predictable.

        Imagine you could hover in one spot over the 47th Parallel while the rotating Earth sweeps beneath you.

        Start levitating at sunrise on the International Dateline, just south of the Aleutian Islands in the blueness of the Bering Sea.

        You'll watch Pacific waves for awhile, then the Kuril Islands; then Russia's Sikhote-Alin Mountains (where a 70-ton meteorite fell in 1947); Manchuria; Mongolia; Kazakhstan; the Caspian Depression; the Ukraine; Moldova; Romania; Budapest, Hungary; Salzburg, Austria; Bern, Switzerland; the Loire Valley in France.

        The Atlantic Ocean will drift below you. Next comes Newfoundland, New Brunswick, the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario, Lake Superior, Minnesota, North Dakota, Montana, a sliver of Idaho, and finally, Washington State, the last place on Earth before Latitude 47 slips back to the sea.


        http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/...

        © grover. "Buy! Buy!" says the sign in the shop window. "Why? Why?" says the junk in the yard. -- John Denver

        by grover on Mon Jun 13, 2011 at 09:25:49 PM PDT

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        •  I like it! (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          grover

          My favorites are the 45th and 46th parallels.

          I wish I could park the South Island of New Zealand right off the Oregon coast. It would make a lovely addition to the Pacific Northwest. Stewart Island can come too.

          Independent, Auckland Central resident, MD-05 voter, OR-01 native, Swingnut for life, and keeper of the DKE glossary.

          by SaoMagnifico on Mon Jun 13, 2011 at 09:40:18 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Good. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            SaoMagnifico

            And Loire Valley. We'll make our own little uh, village here.

            © grover. "Buy! Buy!" says the sign in the shop window. "Why? Why?" says the junk in the yard. -- John Denver

            by grover on Mon Jun 13, 2011 at 11:00:28 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Interesting, that (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              grover

              The three top pinot noir regions in the world are all between the 45th and 48th parallels: the Willamette Valley and Burgundy (including the Loire Valley) in the Northern Hemisphere and Central Otago in the Southern Hemisphere. The Russian River, Yarra Valley, and Marlborough Region, other highly rated pinot noir regions - though not, in my opinion, quite as consistently excellent - are all between the 37th and the 42nd parallels (the former north, the latter two south).

              Independent, Auckland Central resident, MD-05 voter, OR-01 native, Swingnut for life, and keeper of the DKE glossary.

              by SaoMagnifico on Mon Jun 13, 2011 at 11:20:17 PM PDT

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              •  I don't buy California Pinots pretty much ever. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                SaoMagnifico

                That's what Oregon (and Burgundy, of course) is for.

                Just like I wouldn't be inclined buy an Oregon Zin.

                The best Cab I've ever had from an Oregon winery comes from Columbia Valley & Yakima a grapes. THAT is a winemaker who understands that we can try to force grapes to do what we want them to be.... the wine always tastes forced.  

                Or he can let grapes be who they should be.

                © grover. "Buy! Buy!" says the sign in the shop window. "Why? Why?" says the junk in the yard. -- John Denver

                by grover on Tue Jun 14, 2011 at 12:49:19 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Absolutely... (0+ / 0-)

                  Agreed on California pinots. Maybe it's just my Oregonian bias, but I'd take a Willamette Valley over a Russian River pinot just about every time.

                  If you haven't gotten the chance to try a good one from Central Otago, I strongly recommend it. Mt. Difficulty Roaring Meg is a very good one, as is The People's Pinot Noir (which is cheaper and thus kinder to me at the supermarket). I haven't had the fortune to try a bottle of Lowburn Ferry, but both its 2008 and 2009 vintages were international award-winners. The Peregrine and Mondillo pinots are also highly rated, but I haven't tried either of them. Not sure what availability is like outside of Australasia, though I know Central Otago growers have recently been lobbying to get a geographic indication recognized internationally.

                  Independent, Auckland Central resident, MD-05 voter, OR-01 native, Swingnut for life, and keeper of the DKE glossary.

                  by SaoMagnifico on Tue Jun 14, 2011 at 03:28:39 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

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