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Culture-war conversations often end with a verse from Leviticus, the old testament book of laws. After the verse has been quoted, it does no good to point out that the implied solution is impractical or unfair or causes needless suffering. God has given his command and we should be carrying it out, whether it makes sense to us or not.

Strangely, though, the economic parts of Leviticus aren't quoted with the same air of ultimate authority. If they were, Biblical literalists might have to become radicals rather than reactionaries.

Let's look at specifics ...

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[from The Weekly Sift]

For example, when vulture capitalists ruin a town by closing factories and shipping jobs overseas, someone might quote Leviticus 19:9-10, which clearly says not to wring every last dime of profit out of your business.

When you reap the harvest of your land, do not reap to the very edges of your field or gather the gleanings of your harvest. Do not go over your vineyard a second time or pick up the grapes that have fallen. Leave them for the poor and the foreigner.
The foreigner? You mean, like, illegal aliens? Could be. Leviticus 19:33-34 says:
When a foreigner resides among you in your land, do not mistreat them. The foreigner residing among you must be treated as your native-born. Love them as yourself, for you were foreigners in Egypt.
It doesn't say anything about a green card, it just says "resides among you in your land". (Don't argue with me, argue with God. I'm just reading literally.)

But by far the most radical part of the book is Leviticus 25, the chapter that institutes the Jubilee Year.

Consecrate the fiftieth year and proclaim liberty throughout the land to all its inhabitants. It shall be a jubilee for you; each of you is to return to your family property and to your own clan. The fiftieth year shall be a jubilee for you; do not sow and do not reap what grows of itself or harvest the untended vines. For it is a jubilee and is to be holy for you; eat only what is taken directly from the fields. In this Year of Jubilee everyone is to return to their own property.
"Their own property" includes anything that has been sold or repossessed since the last Jubilee:
If one of your fellow Israelites becomes poor and sells some of their property ... [and] if they do not acquire the means to repay, what was sold will remain in the possession of the buyer until the Year of Jubilee. It will be returned in the Jubilee, and they can then go back to their property.
Basically, every 50th year all mortgages and foreclosures are cancelled, and society does a reset on land ownership. Anybody whose debts forced them into slavery is freed.

I know what you're thinking: "That would never work." And you're absolutely right: It would never work with our modern capitalist notion of private property. But guess what? Leviticus has a completely different understanding of property:

The land must not be sold permanently, because the land is mine and you reside in my land as foreigners and strangers. Throughout the land that you hold as a possession, you must provide for the redemption of the land.
So the Earth itself belongs to God, while human deed-holders only own what the land produces.
If you sell land to any of your own people or buy land from them, do not take advantage of each other. You are to buy from your own people on the basis of the number of years since the Jubilee. And they are to sell to you on the basis of the number of years left for harvesting crops. When the years are many, you are to increase the price, and when the years are few, you are to decrease the price, because what is really being sold to you is the number of crops.
Leviticus was talking about an agrarian economy. If you wanted to apply this today, you might generalize to something like this: The Bible does not support private ownership of the means of production. The owner owns the product, not the means of production.

Taking Leviticus 25 seriously would force a sweeping re-visioning of the economic system. That would be a lot of work, and cause a certain amount of distress for the people who own property under our more free-trading definition. Why go to all that trouble? Unless you think this the Word of God or something.

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Originally posted to Pericles on Sun Jul 15, 2012 at 04:56 AM PDT.

Also republished by Spiritual Organization of Unapologetic Liberals at Daily Kos, Street Prophets , and Promote the General Welfare.

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