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In the United States the designation “experimental” on aircraft includes homebuilt aircraft, most of which have been built following conventional designs or using kits. They are not really experimental in terms of using a design which has not been fully proven in flight. The aircraft on display at the Evergreen Air Museum in McMinnville, Oregon, include a number of experimental (i.e. homebuilt) aircraft.

X5351

X5252a

X5253

Shown above is a 1980 Quickie Q2. This aircraft was inspired by the X-Wing fighter from the movie Star Wars. About 2000 of these kits were manufactured before the Quickie Aircraft Company ceased production. The plane has a top speed of 180 miles per hour and can cruise at 140 miles per hour.

X5254

Shown above is a 1988 Lancair 360. It has a top speed of 260 miles per hour and can cruise at 235 miles per hour. It has a cruising range of 1,140 miles.

X5257

Shown above is a 1979 Glasair SH-2. Over 3,000 of these kits have been produced. The kit was designed by three Boeing Aircraft engineers who wanted to produce a quick-build kit with a pre-molded skin of sandwiched fiberglass, foam and fiberglass. It has a top speed of 260 miles per hour and can cruise at 201 miles per hour. It has a cruising range of 1,177 miles.

X5259

X5264

Shown above is a 1963 Thorp T-18 Tiger. It has a top speed of 210 miles per hour and can cruise at 201 miles per hour.

Originally posted to Ojibwa on Thu Jan 17, 2013 at 02:03 PM PST.

Also republished by Kossack Air Force.

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