OK

As she mulls her own political return, Alex Sink "resents all the attention on lifelong-Republican-turned-Democrat Charlie Crist and is intent on being courted for as long as possible," the Tampa Bay Times reports.

She is "revolted by the prospect of Crist as the Democratic nominee" and called the possibility "a disaster."

"The campaign against former Gov. Crist would be brutal, she said, noting the job losses during his term, flip-flops on issues, 'plus all the stuff that hasn't been written about yet, about the Republican Party fiasco, about Jim Greer, about the party in the Bahamas,' she said, referring to Crist's hand-picked GOP chairman, now in prison for stealing party funds and who was accused of hiring prostitutes at a fundraising retreat Crist attended."

Reading what Sink has to say, the first question which comes to mind is, bitter much, Alex?

My Lord is Sink green with envy at the sight of Crist winning over her their partymates with ease. Of course, she is bitter. Of course, she is envious.

Criticism of Sink had been put on hold while she mourned the passing of her late husband, Bill McBride, but that cease-fire is now over.

In fact, if Sink wants to talk about disastrous gubernatorial campaigns, she need look no further than the mirror.

If Sink wants to talk about disastrous gubernatorial campaigns, perhaps she needs to be reminded of her petty decision to distance her campaign from President Obama.

If Sink wants to talk about disastrous gubernatorial campaigns, perhaps she needs to be reminded of her campaign's inability to chase absentee ballots in central Florida and the I-4 corridor, where upwards of 50,000 absentee ballots ordered by Obama voters went un-chased. Instead, as Joy Reid reported, the Sink team chased phantom votes in north Florida and the Panhandle, spending way too much time there, while eking out only a 6,900 vote margin over the ABR entity in crucial Miami-Dade.

If Sink wants to talk about disastrous gubernatorial campaigns, perhaps she needs to be reminded of her ruinous decision to turn down $2.4 million in public campaign financing. (To understand how dumb that was, Reid wrote in an autopsy of the campaign, consider that Sink raised about $11.2 million and got 2.6 million votes. Assuming she spent it all, that breaks down to $4.30 a vote. At that rate, 62,000 votes would have cost the Sink campaign a mere $266,454. They would have gotten at least 10 times that from public financing.)

If Sink wants to talk about disastrous gubernatorial campaigns, perhaps she needs to be reminded of when she cheated on live TV during a debate.  

If Sink wants to talk about disastrous gubernatorial campaigns, perhaps she needs to be reminded that, despite all of her failings and miscues, The New York Times' polling wunderkind Nate Silver still gave Sink a 58% chance of winning two weeks out from the election and yet she still lost.

Crist would be a disaster, huh? That's a helluva prediction from the politician named the worst candidate of 2010 by MSNBC (of course, Crist was also a finalist for this infamous distinction, but he's never had a cross word for Sink.)

"It's unbelievable,'' Todd said. "Think about it: You lost to a guy who defrauded Medicare — in Florida! Okay?"

Losing to a guy who defrauded Medicare in a state with more folks per capita on Medicare than maybe any other state -- now that's what you'd call a disaster.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.