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Monday!

Itzl AlertingAs you can see by Itzl's concerned look, this group is for us to check in at to let people know we are alive, doing OK, and not affected by such things as heat, blizzards, floods, wild fires, hurricanes, tornadoes, power outages, or other such things that could keep us off DKos. It's also so we can find other Kossacks nearby for in-person checks when other methods of communication fail - a buddy system. Members come here to check in. If you're not here, or anywhere else on DKos, and there are adverse conditions in your area (floods, heatwaves, hurricanes, etc.), we and your buddy are going to check up on you. If you are going to be away from your computer for a day or a week, let us know here.  We care!
We have split up the publishing duties, but we welcome everyone in IAN to do daily diaries for the group!  Every member is an editor, so anyone can take a turn when they have something to say, photos and music to share, a cause to promote or news!

Ok, we have a current diary schedule.  If you would like to fill in, either post in thread or send FloridaSNMom a Kosmail with the date. If you need someone to fill in, ditto. FSNMom is here on and off through the day usually from around 9:30 or 10 am eastern to around 11 pm eastern.

Underneath the sea, far, far below where mere divers can go, live some fantastical creatures. The depths of the sea are pitch black, and water pressure can be as much as 500 pounds per square inch.

Many years ago, after a storm, a large, ugly purple fish with a huge, fanged mouth washed up on our beach. Daddy said that it was a goosefish. It was truly hideous.

Here's another picture:

Goosefish a/k/a monkfish
Goosefish
So what kind of creatures live in these deep, dark depths? Very scary ones. This is an Anglerfish:
Anglerfish
Anglerfish
The anglerfish uses its illuminated lure as its hunts for prey. This specialized spine is highly maneuverable and can be moved in any direction. The anglerfish is known to remain completely motionless, waving its lure back and forth like a fishing pole. When the prey fish gets close enough, the angler snaps it up with its powerful jaws and swallows it whole. The sharp teeth of the angler are angled inwards, which helps to prevent the prey from escaping. The anglerfish can extend both its jaw and its stomach to an incredible size, allowing it to swallow prey twice the size of its entire body. Since food can be scarce in the deep sea, this special adaptation allows it to stock up on food during times of plenty.

Source, more info

This looks like a giant bug and is in fact related to pill bugs:

Giant isopod
Giant Isopod
Giant isopods are known to reach a size of over 16 inches in length and are one of the largest members of the crustacean family. These animals are very prehistoric in appearance. When threatened, the can roll themselves into a tight ball where they are protected by their strong, armor-plated shells. They have complex mouths that contain many components that work together to pierce, shred, and disembowel live or dead prey. Giant isopods are all over the world at depths of over 2000 feet.
Source

Aren't they fascinating? If you were a fish, what kind of fish would you be? I'd like to be a sailfish. They're graceful and very fast:

sailfish
Sailfish
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