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Some New Year's Eve traditions from around the world.

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Auld Lang Syne
The most commonly sung song for English-speakers on New Year's eve, "Auld Lang Syne" is an old Scottish song that was first published by the poet Robert Burns in the 1796 edition of the book, Scots Musical Museum.  Burns transcribed it (and made some refinements to the lyrics) after he heard it sung by an old man from the Ayrshire area of Scotland, Burns's homeland.
It is often remarked that "Auld Lang Syne" is one of the most popular songs that nobody knows the lyrics to.

Hogmanay (Scotland)
The birthplace of "Auld Lang Syne" is also the home of Hogmanay (hog-mah-NAY), the rousing Scottish New Year's celebration (the origins of the name are obscure).  One of the traditions is "first-footing".   Shortly after midnight on New Year's Eve, neighbors pay visits to each other and impart New Year's wishes.  Traditionally, first foots used to bring along a gift of coal for the fire, or shortbread.  It is considered especially lucky if a tall, dark, and handsome man is the first to enter your house after the new year is rung in.  The Edinburgh Hogmanay celebration is the largest in the country, and consists of an all-night street party.

Oshogatsu (Japan)
The new year is the most important holiday in Japan, and is a symbol of renewal.  In December, various Bonenkai or "forget-the-year parties" are held to bid farewell to the problems and concerns of the past year and prepare for a new beginning. Misunderstandings and grudges are forgiven and houses are scrubbed.   At midnight on Dec. 31, Buddhist temples strike their gongs 108 times, in a effort to expel 108 types of human weakness.   New Year's day itself is a day of joy and no work is to be done. Children receive otoshidamas, small gifts with money inside.   Sending New Year's cards is a popular tradition.  If postmarked by a certain date, the Japanese post office guarantees delivery of all New Year's cards on Jan. 1.

Spain
The Spanish ritual on New Year's eve is to eat twelve grapes at midnight.   The tradition is meant to secure twelve happy months in the coming year.

The Netherlands
The Dutch burn bonfires of Christmas trees on the street and launch fireworks.  The fires are meant to purge the old and welcome the new.

Greece
In Greece, New Year's day is also the Festival of St. Basil, one of the founders of the Greek Orthodox Church. One of the traditional foods served is Vassilopitta, or St Basil's cake.   A silver or gold coin is baked inside the cake.   Whoever finds the coin in their piece of cake will be especially lucky during the coming year.

United States
Probably the most famous tradition in the United States is the dropping of the New Year ball in Times Square, New York City, at 11:59 P.M.  Thousands gather to watch the ball make its one-minute descent, arriving exactly at midnight.  The tradition first began in 1907. The original ball was made of iron and wood; the current ball is made of Waterford Crystal, weighs 1,070 pounds, and is six feet in diameter.
A traditional southern New Year's dish is Hoppin' John—black eyed peas and ham hocks. An old saying goes, "Eat peas on New Year's day to have plenty of everything the rest of the year."
Another American tradition is the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California.  The Tournament of Roses parade that precedes the football game on New Year's day is made up of elaborate and inventive floats.  The first parade was held in 1886.

I hope you all have a happy and safe New Years.

Originally posted to Itzl Alert Network on Fri Dec 27, 2013 at 09:55 PM PST.

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