OK

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI) listens to testimony during a hearing on
Flame-riddled pants not pictured.
Rep. Paul Ryan on how he doesn't want to raise the minimum wage because of his sincere concern for young people:
“The majority of these workers are younger people just getting into the workforce,” Ryan said. “What we don’t want to do is support ideas, especially in this kind of economy, which will reduce the availability of jobs, number one, but more importantly reduce the availability of jobs from the very people we want to get into jobs so they can start climbing that ladder of life, so they can get in and start working their way up and get the skills they need to earn a better job.”
Reality:
Among workers who would be affected by raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10, the average age is 35 years old, and more than a third (34.5 percent) are at least 40 years old.  In fact, minimum-wage workers are often bread-winners, with families who depend on their earnings.

The average low-wage worker who would benefit from a minimum-wage increase is responsible for half (50 percent) of his or her family’s income (ranging from 33 percent in New Hampshire to 60 percent in Louisiana). Nationally, nearly one in five children (19 percent) has a parent who would be affected by raising the minimum wage to $10.10 (ranging from 11 percent in Alaska to 26 percent in Texas).

But please, tell us another one, Republican wonk who cares deeply about poverty.

Originally posted to Daily Kos Labor on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 10:50 AM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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