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These diaries are the most Recommended for all time for this tag:
When one thinks of Beatrix Potter, one is naturally drawn to her children's books, Peter Rabbit and the others, which are familiar to most literate people who have read them as children or to ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 36 comments on Fri Mar 09, 2012 at 07:30 AM PST with 92 Recommends
I am finally getting around to the earliest women recorded reliably to have worked in the sciences. Hypatia was a mathematician and physicist at the nearly legendary Alexandrian Museum and Library ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 54 comments on Sat Jan 19, 2013 at 04:08 PM PST with 86 Recommends
I have now posted 24 diaries concerning the contributions of women to science prior to the 21st Century. These have been: Barbara McClintock http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/03/03/1182755/-Women-...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 51 comments on Wed Mar 06, 2013 at 06:13 PM PST with 70 Recommends
The atomic bomb was a major technological accomplishment, despite its moral problems. Some physicists at the time thought that a chain reaction that would lead to a nuclear explosion in which at ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 20 comments on Mon Apr 16, 2012 at 06:04 PM PDT with 55 Recommends
I have hesitated about writing a diary on Marie Curie. With the possible exception of Rachel Carson, more has been written about her than any other female scientist. She was the winner of not just ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 18 comments on Sun May 05, 2013 at 06:20 PM PDT with 52 Recommends
Louis Leakey is justly famous as the discoverer of a number of fossils of early man at Olduvai Gorge. However the effort became a family affair very early, with his wife Mary Leakey, as well as his ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 22 comments on Sun Feb 02, 2014 at 06:35 PM PST with 49 Recommends
There were quite a number of female botanists during the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, but for the United States at least, the true pioneer was Jane Colden, who lived in the Eighteenth Century.
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 13 comments on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 05:54 PM PST with 45 Recommends
Amalie Emmy Noether was born to a Jewish family in Bavaria on March 23, 1882. By her death she was considered by Albert Einstein and many others the greatest female mathematician in the world at the ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 22 comments on Mon Apr 08, 2013 at 06:38 PM PDT with 43 Recommends
Elizabeth Maria Gifford was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in December of 1854. She was pretty much associated with her birth city for most of her life. She graduated from Vassar College in 1876 and ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 12 comments on Sat Apr 28, 2012 at 04:53 PM PDT with 42 Recommends
Chien-Shiung Wu was one of the few women scientists to work on the Manhattan Project to build the first atomic bomb. Born in Liuhe, China, she attended Mingde Women's Vocational Continuing School,
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 8 comments on Thu Oct 24, 2013 at 03:46 PM PDT with 40 Recommends
A most unlikely event happened from 1766 to 1775. A woman sailed around the world, partly as a botanical assistant on a scientific expedition. She did so, at least part of the way, disguised as a ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 7 comments on Sun Jan 13, 2013 at 04:23 PM PST with 39 Recommends
One female scientist was closely associated with my father-in-law, Coleman Goin. Like him, her main interest was frogs. I am talking about Doris Mabel Cochran, who was one of the few women in ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 9 comments on Tue Mar 12, 2013 at 04:54 PM PDT with 37 Recommends
Margaret Mead was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on December 16, 1901. She was the first born of a professor of finance at the University of Pennsylvania and a sociologist who studied Italian ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 15 comments on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 11:51 AM PST with 36 Recommends
Another member of a husband and wife team was Anna Botsford Comstock, who married the entomologist John Henry Comstock in 1878. In the case of Ms. Comstock she also wrote works on her own and was a ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 14 comments on Sun Dec 01, 2013 at 09:01 PM PST with 34 Recommends
Certainly the Curies were a talented family, mostly when it came to physics and chemistry, with five Nobel Prizes between them, not including the Nobel Prize for Peace awarded to Henry Richardson ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 8 comments on Sat May 11, 2013 at 11:56 AM PDT with 34 Recommends
Scientific illustration has had a definite effect on field biology, as a recent book and print collection published by the American Museum of Natural History in New York ("Natural Histories: ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 11 comments on Thu Jan 10, 2013 at 02:53 PM PST with 34 Recommends
I am taking the liberty of writing a diary on a female scientist whom I never met and who died in the 21st Century (in fact this very year.) This is in large part because of her 1951 book "Lady ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 9 comments on Sat May 16, 2015 at 10:09 AM PDT with 31 Recommends
Marie Victoire Labour (1876-1971), like some other early women scientists, became interested in a rather obscure area of study, in her case marine planktonic organisms. She became one of the world'...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 6 comments on Sat May 18, 2013 at 07:25 AM PDT with 31 Recommends
Of all the female scientists with whom I have had no direct association, Jocelyn Crane certainly had the most influential on my own research. I never met her and the letter I sent to her in the ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 7 comments on Sun Mar 17, 2013 at 04:39 PM PDT with 31 Recommends
One woman who was a centenarian, Inge Lehmann, was also a famous seismologist who was the first to describe the inner core of the earth. Her brilliant career was in part the result of going to a ...
by Desert Scientist
Comment Count 8 comments on Thu May 30, 2013 at 06:05 PM PDT with 30 Recommends