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Dylan is perhaps the trickiest man in rock, and the hardest to put in a box. In the 60s there were people who thought he was the messiah. Eric Clapton had the same experience, until Hendrix came along. But even today some people say that Dylan is deeper and more original than Elvis or the Beatles, that he invented the vocabulary of rock, or did more at least than any other songsmith. He's the only artist (except Neil?) who has been making first-rate rock for four decades. On the other hand, I have friends with large collections who never listen to him because he sings "like a cow caught in a barbed-wire fence."

So here's an artist critics would say belongs in the front rank of the rock pantheon, perhaps in the lead. And the Hit Parade pretty much says "NO!" Looking at the US and UK top 20, Dylan had 7 hits in the 60s and 2 in the 70s, and none got higher than #4 in the charts. `Like a Rolling Stone", which frequently tops critics' lists as the best rock single ever, reached #8. If you look at the 100 top-selling rock albums, you won't see Dylan's name.

This is why I'm curious what others on DailyKos think of Dylan, and how you rate his individual albums. Because if you're into the roots of classic rock, `What's your favorite Dylan album' can be a pretty tricky question.

Last Sunday I asked, What's the 13th best Dylan album?
Which may seem like an odd question. If you read that diary you'll find out why I only had time to play my 12 favorite Dylan albums on the road to Buffalo. (incidentally, there was another interesting Dylan question last Sunday:  Best Dylan line?)

I asked what your 13th favorite Dylan album was because of driving circumstances, but also because Dylan is one of a handful of artists the question makes sense for. Try thinking of your 13th favorite album by Led Zep, the Clash or Radiohead and you'll have a bit of trouble. Excellent bands, who didn't release more than 12 worthwhile albums. A brief digression, while I walk into my bedroom and peruse my collection: I have 12 or more albums by Miles Davis, Bob Marley, Stevie Wonder, Prince, the Beatles, David Bowie, Elvis Costello, Bob Dylan, Genesis, the Jam (if you count all my 12" singles), the Kinks, Van Morrison, Pink Floyd, Lou Reed, REM, the Rolling Stones, U2, the Who and Neil Young. But Dylan, the Stones and Miles Davis (and possibly Elvis P., whose work I know a fraction of) are the only ones I could imagine getting 30 albums by.

As you perhaps have already gathered, I like to talk, and I like music, and I could talk about Dylan for 3 hours without stopping for a glass of water. But I'm trying to get a dialog (polylog?) going here, so I'd like to know not what the critics say, but just the Dylan album you like the most, the one you're most likely to play and most likely to be enchanted by.

Here's what people said last week (3 people gave lists of their top 5 Dylan albums, which really helps in terms of getting a bigger picture of what Dylan fans like):

x picked Blonde on Blonde, Highway 61 Revisited, Blood on the Tracks, Nashville Skyline and Time out of Mind.

BenGoshi picked 7: Blood on the Tracks, Highway 61, Blonde on Blonde, Time out of Mind, Freewheelin', Infidels and Planet Waves.

Caldonia picked Bringing it all Back Home, Bob Dylan, Highway 61, Blonde on Blonde and Freewheelin' (no picks later than '66).

Maryscott OConnor said Dylan's best is `Blood on the Tracks' (4 others agreed with a 4 rating)
Elwood Dowd spoke up for Live 1966: Royal Albert Hall
Bumblebums for Another Side of Bob Dylan
existenz for World Gone Wrong
pastordan for Oh Mercy
DHinMI for The Times they are a Changing
ourprez08 for Good as I Been to you
(though all of these were asked their 13th favorite Dylan album, and may have favoriter albums)

So what are your favorite Dylan albums and why?

(Since you can only have 12 answers to a poll, I've had to leave out great albums like Freewheelin, Another Side, Basement Tapes and Oh Mercy. Just write a comment if I axed your personal favorite. And, sorry if I did) Update [2005-8-27 16:33:53 by Brecht]: So far it looks like 'Blood on the Tracks' is winning, with 'Blonde on Blonde' second and 'Highway 61' close behind. 'Blood on the Tracks': there's a version, 'Blood on the Tapes' which is all the original, less-polished versions of the same songs. Or you can compile something similar between 'Biograph' and 'Bootleg 1-3', which would have alternate versions and a couple of different songs ('Up to me' and 'Call Letter Blues'). Secondly, I tend to find 'Highway 61' and 'Blonde on Blonde' more powerful and compelling. But maybe we should just play 'Blood on the Tracks' louder. One time in Chicago the guy upstairs did that, and I discovered what great bass there is on the album. What 'Blood on the Tracks' certainly has going for it is that it's Dylan's most accessible album. He sings pretty sweetly, and he also does something almost unprecedented in rock: he really invites the listener in. If you're paying attention to 'Tangled up in Blue' or 'Simple Twist of Fate', you'll get sucked into the story of these star-crossed lovers and find yourself sitting on the bench with them. He tells you enough story to put you right there, but leaves you enough mystery to always hunger for the next line.

Originally posted to Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 08:33 AM PDT.

Poll

What's your favorite Dylan album?

3%3 votes
9%8 votes
17%14 votes
18%15 votes
4%4 votes
0%0 votes
32%26 votes
3%3 votes
1%1 votes
0%0 votes
4%4 votes
3%3 votes

| 81 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  none of the above (none)
    it's his first eponymous album recorded (I believe) just him and his guitar in a studio one afternoon, all one take.

    Most true to his Woody Guthrie roots.

  •  Three candidates (none)
    • Blood on the Tracks. (I agree with MSOC -- but I think you had aleady explained that you left it behind because everyone in the car knew it by heart.)

    • Blonde on Blonde.

    • Live, Albert Hall, 1966. Part of the 'bootleg' series, released in '98, but the audio is excellent. One side acoustic, one electric (with the Band) -- from the months when he fractured the folk world by going electric / rock.

    I've got blisters on my fingers!

    by Elwood Dowd on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 08:39:11 AM PDT

    •  hello (none)
      I think 'Blood' and 'Blonde' are likely to top the poll (though Highway 61's doing well so far).

      But the Albert Hall set, when he was writing history with the Band, is probably the best single view there is into Dylan's furious brilliance at his 60s peak. Reminds me of a great quote about art, something like there is no time to write a materpiece, there is only time to explode.

      "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

      by Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 09:04:13 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Dylan is the most influential musical artist (none)
    of the last 50 years. The Beatles, Sam Cooke, Hendrix, Neil Young, Springsteen, etc,etc, they were all deeply influenced by Dylan.

    And yet if he came along today the music industry machine would say:

    1. He looks funny.
    2. He can't sing.
    3. We don't understand his lyrics.
    4. What the heck is that with the harmonica?
    5. He will go nowhere.

    I hope you were lucky enough to see him this summer. He was great here in NJ.

    Keep your eyes on the prize.

    by Better Days on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 08:48:04 AM PDT

    •  I almost agree (none)
      but bear in mind that he was influenced by all those artists too, and by folk tales and and country and blues that you and I have never heard of.

      I've only seen Dylan 3 times. One was good and 2 were excellent. But I have such respect for his never-ending touring and his constant reinvention of his own work. 'Budokan' is one of his weaker live albums, but the arrangements with flute et al. shed new light on his old chestnuts.

      I do think he'd have trouble succeeding in the MTV generation. Well, they say Lincoln was too ugly to get elected in te TV age.

      "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

      by Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 08:59:45 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  One of my all time favorite lines (none)
      "I walked down there and ended up
      In one of them coffee-houses on the block.
      Got on the stage to sing and play,
      Man there said, "Come back some other day,
      You sound like a hillbilly;
      We want folk singers here."

      Lyrics to all his songs here

      Dylan is the reason I picked up a guitar at age 15. At one time I could sing (and remember) all the words to Bob Dylan's 115th dream and Gates of Eden and a whole lot more. No wonder I don't have much room left in my brain.
      Couldn't pick a favorite album 'cause tastes change over the years and I revisit them to pick up a new (old) song for my set list every now and then.

      Flags don't kill people, governments do.
      Take back the flag, take back the government.

      by BOHICA on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 09:23:19 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  maybe you need a dumptruck (none)
        to unload your head?

        But if you're gonna cram your head with something, Dylan lyrics is a far better choice than baseball stats or celebrity trivia.

        As for Dylan making you pick up a guitar, I just read that Joni Mitchell and Leonard Cohen each decided to be songwriters after they heard 'Blowin' in the Wind'. When Sam Cooke saw what a skinny young white boy could do, he had to sit down and write 'A Change is Gonna Come'.

        "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

        by Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 09:31:53 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  same shit different decade (none)
      And yet if he came along today the music industry machine would say:  (etc...)

      That's basically what happened back in the day, too.  The problems were a little different -- Dylan's songs were too long to fit on one side of a 45, for example, which isn't a big problem today -- but they also weren't radio-friendly, which still is.

      A strong manager and powerful charisma help.  I bet Dylan would have done at least as well today, since there are so many means to get one's music out without going through the industry.

  •  Richard Thompson and Neil Young (none)
    Those are artists who you could debate their 13th best album, because they have many more than 13 good -to-outstanding albums.

    Same with Van Morrison, and maybe even Elvis Costello.  

    That's just pop/rock genre.  Of course there are plenty of jazz performers have more than 13 good albums.  

    The revolution will not be televised, but we'll analyze it to death at The Next Hurrah.

    by Dana Houle on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 09:40:41 AM PDT

    •  And With His Backlog of Material... (none)
      ...the same will probably apply to Prince.

      And though he's only about 27 years old, if that freak Ryan Adams keeps writing about 5 songs a week, he may get into that territory.  

      The revolution will not be televised, but we'll analyze it to death at The Next Hurrah.

      by Dana Houle on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 09:42:34 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Oh Shit! (none)
      How could I forget Joni Mitchell???

      Dylan supposedly once said that all the good songwriters are men.  Somebody asked him about Joni Mitchell.  He reportedly replied "yeah, well, she's a man."

      The revolution will not be televised, but we'll analyze it to death at The Next Hurrah.

      by Dana Houle on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 09:44:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I felt a bit sorry (none)
        when I found there's no woman I have 12 albums by. Joni Mitchell came closest, followed by Joan Armatrading and Siouxsie (with her Banshees).

        All those you mention are great artists (probably even Ryan). The biggest shame is Van Morrison, who's done so many lovely albums and most people only know 'Moondance' and 'Brown-eyed girl'.

        "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

        by Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 09:54:26 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Amen to both of those! (none)
      I've had the good fortune to see Richard Thompson three times live.  Twice at the legendary First Avenue, with full band, and once in the Fitzgerald Theatre doing a solo acoustic show.  The man does guitar things that will always amaze me, and he's got songwriting chops to burn right alongside.

      Neil Young - what can anyone say at this point?  One of the all time greats.  One of the best live performances I've ever seen.  And he made Crosby, Stills, and Nash tolerable with his astringency cutting through their syrup-sweetness.

      "Don't get mad. Don't get even. Just get elected, then get even." --James Carville

      by MN camera on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 10:12:45 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I've Seen Richard Thompson About 8 or 9 Times (none)
        He's always excellent.  And the guy's written so many great songs that he's had two tribute albums of covers dedicated to his work.  Beat the Retreat has some big names--REM, David Byrne, Bonnie Raitt--but the best performances of the 16 songs covered are by some of the less well known artists, like Shawn Colvin and Louden Wainwright, Graham Parker, X, June Tabor and Martin Carthy.  (Los Lobos, though, among the "big names" was great.)  And The World is a Wonderful Place has, other than one song, a completely different list of 18 songs, mostly covered by more folk and roots rock oriented performers, and that collection is just as good.

        I know this great diary is about Dylan, but I think anyone who appreciates Dylan and isn't familiar with Richard Thompson is denying themselves some wonderful music, amazing songwriting and guitar work by one of the best guitarists alive.  

        If you want a good compilation of his work (at least through about 1993, though he's had several good albums since), start with Watching the Dark: The History of Richard Thompson.  And if you love how Dylan took folk music electric, you must listen to the first four Fairport Convention albums, especially Liege and Leaf.  

        OK, sorry Brecht, just couldn't pass up the opportunity to proselytize on behalf of Richard Thompson.

        The revolution will not be televised, but we'll analyze it to death at The Next Hurrah.

        by Dana Houle on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 10:31:56 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Richard Thompson: great songwriter (none)
          And I agree 100% on Beat the Retreat.  The June Tabor tracks are so haunting.  And I also love the Five Blind Boys of Alabama doing Dimming of the Day.
        •  Only saw Richard Thompson once (none)
          but I'd happily see him 8 or 9 more times. I love Fairport Convention - I've been listening a lot to Jefferson Airplane, and I wonder if Fairport were influenced by them? The albums I have by Richard and Linda are full of power and grace. And every album I get of Richard's has a couple of real gems on it, except for those like 'Rumor and Sigh' that have nothing but.

          He has a more comprehensive boxed set coming out soon, which sounds promising - I'll try and find the rock mag where he mentions it in an interview, to give you more info.

          "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

          by Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 12:48:12 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Richard Thompson box set (none)
          In the 100th issue of Uncut they review 'Front Parlour Ballads' and give it 5 stars. They also ask Richard Thompson about "a five-disc box-set career retrospective on the way shortly".

          Richard replies: "They used my archives, but it's not my selection. There were a few tracks I told them I didn't think were up to it, so I've edited it a bit. But they've dug out some seriously obscure stuff."

          "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

          by Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 02:01:24 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  This was very hard, but so much fun (none)
    to think about something that actually brings me joy, rather than pain or anger like so many of the things we must consider here at dailyKos.

    This was a really hard choice, but "Bringing It All Back Home" beat out "Highway 61" by a whisker. If I could have chosen them as a double entry I would have.

    As long as I count the votes, what are you going to do about it? - William Marcy Tweed

    by sidnora on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 09:49:06 AM PDT

    •  even more than Blonde on Blonde (none)
      those two albums before it burn with the fires of invention. And a handful of amphetamines.

      "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

      by Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 09:56:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yup, pills on fire. (none)
        Even though it's otherwise brilliant, I always downrate "Blonde on Blonde" a notch for "Sad-Eyed Lady", half an hour of self-indulgence.

        As long as I count the votes, what are you going to do about it? - William Marcy Tweed

        by sidnora on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 10:12:28 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Agree about Sad-Eyed Lady (none)
          which I think is Dylan showing off too much, and not half the song 'Desolation Row' is. It just seems repetitive to me.

          I'm glad you feel the same, because I just bought the latest Mojo, where they asked a load of singers and songwriters to rate their top Dylan songs, and then came up with a list of the top 100.

          'Desolation Row' was 4th, and 'Sad-Eyed Lady' 3rd, which just seems unearned to me.

          "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

          by Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 12:54:26 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Well, some people (none)
            are impressed by self-indulgence - otherwise Emerson, Lake and Palmer would have had no career. I'm surprised it came from singers & songwriters, though.

            And shame on you for the tease - what were #s 1 and 2? After all, this is the guy who wrote "Blowin' in the Wind", "Like a Rolling Stone", "Mr. Tambourine Man", "Positively 4th Street", "The Times They Are A'Changin'", "Ballad of a Thin Man"..... this is getting silly. You get the idea.

            And a quick trip down memory lane: I remember playing "Desolation Row" for my father in about 1967, convinced that it was the most profound piece of music ever written and that he'd simply be unable to resist responding to it. He couldn't understand a word, and eventually fell asleep. But I was so much older then, I'm younger than that now.

            As long as I count the votes, what are you going to do about it? - William Marcy Tweed

            by sidnora on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 02:31:08 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Top Dylan Songs (none)
              yes, I am shameful tease. Your comments are interesting, articulate and pithy so, sidnora, even though only 3 or 4 people will ever see this comment, here are the top 30 on the list. Okay 40. But that's my highest offer, as I'm also pretty lazy:

              40   I'll keep it with mine
              39   Dear landlord
              38   Knockin' on heaven's door
              37   Gotta serve somebody
              36   Brownsville girl
              35   Isis
              34   Blowin' in the wind
              33   You're gonna make me lonesome when you go
              32   Love minus zero/No limit
              31   Man in the long black coat
              30   I'll be your baby tonight
              29   Girl from the north country ('63)
              28   I want you
              27   All along the watchtower
              26   Shelter from the storm
              25   Hurricane
              24   I shall be released
              23   A hard rain's a gonna fall
              22   The times they are a changin'
              21   Visions of Johanna
              20   Ballad of a thin man
              19   Idiot wind
              18   Subterranean homesick blues
              17   Every grain of sand
              16   Masters of war
              15   Tangled up in blue
              14   Mr. Tambourine man
              13   Highway 61 revisited
              12   Love sick
              11   The lonesome death of Hattie Carroll
              10   Just like a woman
               9   Mississippi
               8   It's alright ma (I'm only bleeding)
               7   It's all over now, baby blue
               6   It ain't me babe
               5   Blind Willie McTell
               4   Desolation row
               3   Sad eyed lady of the lowlands
               2   Positively 4th Street
               1   Like a rolling stone.

              I thought about writing a second diary today (yeah, I'm really only lazy when I feel that way). Then I could put the whole 100 up, with some of the things that Al Kooper, Pete Seeger, Robert Plant, Sly Dunbar, Daniel Lanois, Bono, Beck, Sheryl Crow, Richard Thompson and others said about them, and have another poll, and...

              But that would make my last 4 diaries about music, 3 about Dylan, and if that's all I've gotta say for myself, maybe I should be posting (my music diaries) on another blog.

              "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

              by Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 03:12:56 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Thanks for making the effort (none)
                just for li'l ol' me. And you flatter me, as well!

                By all means, leaven your diary-posting with other topics, but please continue to post this type here as well. This is the only blog I read regularly, and I think we all need a break from the relentless stress of the Bushwars once in a while - I know I surely do. And since I don't garden, and never visit the C&J's (that must be why I seem to have lost my TU for about the third time this month), an nice non-political poll is most refreshing.

                And thanks for the list. Very interesting, especially for somone who hasn't followed B.D.'s more recent output: there are a few songs listed that I don't know, and obviously, are worthy of my attention.

                "Like a Rolling Stone" is sort of a given for #1, but I'm pleasantly amazed "Positively 4th St." made #2 - noone is as brilliantly nasty as Dylan when he wants to be, although Elvis Costello has come close. But I expected the great political songs to rate higher. And how ironic, "My Back Pages" isn't even up there.

                As long as I count the votes, what are you going to do about it? - William Marcy Tweed

                by sidnora on Sun Aug 28, 2005 at 08:18:58 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

        •  Half-hour of self-indulgence (none)
          Maybe.

          But understand the AM radio era. Like a Rolling Stone was too long to get much airplay.

          Could be self-indulgence, but could just be breaking down walls.

          Should I meet you by the gate?

          I've got blisters on my fingers!

          by Elwood Dowd on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 06:56:47 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  I'm jumping the queue here (none)
      by replying to an earlier comment of yours, in order to get wider text and not be crammed against the right margin.

      Funny you should compare Dylan and Costello for their vitriol. A housemate and I, back in college, had a running argument in which I claimed Bob was the greatest songwriter in rock and he claimed Elvis was. They also each had a notable streak of productive self-invention (Dylan from 'Another Side' to 3 albums later with 'Blonde on Blonde'; Elvis from 'My Aim is True' to his 4th album, 'Get Happy!'), and Elvis' also was partly fueled by amphetamines.

      'My Back Pages' is only #98 on the list, which seems low since it did represent a huge step forward lyrically for Dylan.

      In case you want to catch up with Dylan's career, but don't know where to start, I'll excerpt from the list of 100 those songs released since '85 (I assume you at least have his albums through 'Slow Train Coming', and also 'Infidels'):

      #89 Talkin' Bear Mountain Picnic Massacre Blues (from Time out of Mind, 1997)
      88 Lonesome Day Blues (Love and Theft, 2001)
      81 Standing in the Doorway (Time out of Mind, '97)
      79 Po' Boy (Love and Theft, '01)
      74 Things Have Changed (Essential Bob Dylan, '00)
      62 Most of the Time (Oh Mercy, '89)
      41 Not Dark Yet (Time out of Mind, '97)
      36 Brownsville Girl (Knocked Out Loaded, '86)
      31 Man in the Long Black Coat (Oh Mercy, '89)
      12 Love Sick (Time out of Mind, '97)
       9 Mississippi (Love and Theft, '01)

      which in my opinion covers the most essential late Dylan albums, except I'm not sure I'd hurry to get 'Knocked Out Loaded'.

      "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

      by Brecht on Sun Aug 28, 2005 at 09:34:05 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Desire... (none)
    I am a big fan of the 'big three' -- BoTT, BoB and 61, but I have always really liked Desire, a whole lot, save the song 'Joey', which I really don't like much at all.

    Desire starts with the powerful "Hurricane", and ends with the very personal "Sara".  Between these two bookends, however, are terrific narratives woven into music.  "Isis", "Romance in Durango", "Black Diamond Bay" -- all great.  

    Time out of Mind is an awesome album too, one of those "cool autumn night" albums where you just wanna sit outside with a blanket and a beer or dram of whiskey and feel sorry for yourself and glad for the world all at the same time.

    Although the masters make the rules / For the wise men and the fools / I got nothing, Ma, to live up to. (Dylan)

    by teedz on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 09:54:37 AM PDT

    •  Sweet Desire (none)
      it's got a load of great songs and wide diversity of feeling. And I just like the Dylan albums where Dylan has women backing him on vocals (especially BoTT, Desire and Street Legal).

      As for 'one of those "cool autumn night" albums where you just wanna sit outside with a blanket and a beer or dram of whiskey and feel sorry for yourself and glad for the world all at the same time', well you have nice way with a phrase.

      "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

      by Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 12:59:34 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Another vote for "Blood" (none)
    The lyrics to "Idiot Wind" are the bitterest words I've ever heard. Not recommended for those recovering from a nasty breakup.
  •  Infidels WOULD have been the best... (none)
    If Dylan didn't tinker with it-

    He removed the two best tracks he had recorded in ages:  Foot of Pride and Blind Willie McTell and replaced them with (not sure but I think) Neighborhood Bully and Union Sundown.

    Imagine an Infidels comprised of:

    1.  Jokerman
    2.  Sweetheart Like You
    3.  Man of Peace
    4.  Blind Willie McTell
    5.  License To Kill
    6.  Don't Fall Apart on Me Tonight
    7.  I and I
    8.  Foot of Pride

    Pretty close parallel to other great Dylan records in terms of quality.

    Oh well.

    And for the record, my fave Dylan song is "The Groom's Still Waiting at the Alter"

    Bush will be impeached.

    by jgkojak on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 10:03:57 AM PDT

    •  Ho (none)
      Sweetheart Like You, Knopfler gettin sick at the end. I love that strange lovesong to that strange Jesus guy

      Anything by Loudon Wainwright III

      by Earl on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 12:17:15 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  absolutely (none)
      half the tracks on 'Infidels' are brilliant, but none so breathtaking as 'Blind Willie McTell'.

      Blind Willie McTell went by a few aliases one of which, 'Georgia Sam', turns up on 'Highway 61'.

      "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

      by Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 01:02:53 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  McCartney (none)

    In your list of rockers who have been doing it for years you left off McCartney- I know a lot of folks lightly dismiss him, but his new album "Chaos and Creation in the Backyard" is looking like an absolute winner.  

    There are songs on every McCartney album (just like every Dylan album) that measure up to his best work:
    From 2001s Driving Rain:  I Do, Lonely Road
    From 1997s Flaming Pie:  Calico Skies, Souvenir, The World Tonight, Somedays

    And you could pick 12 McCartney albums and have a pretty enjoyable listening experience:

    McCartney
    Ram
    Band on the Run
    Venus and Mars
    London Town
    Back To the Egg
    Tug of War
    Flowers in the Dirt
    Unplugged
    Flaming Pie
    Wingspan
    Driving Rain

    Bush will be impeached.

    by jgkojak on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 10:08:17 AM PDT

    •  McCartney (none)
      Some people think we've had enough of Paul McCartney
      Well I just want to say that this is so...

      "Don't get mad. Don't get even. Just get elected, then get even." --James Carville

      by MN camera on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 10:14:43 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Again (none)
        Some people say Sir Paul's a pompous has-been
        It's a sorry fact
        The whole world knows, but here he goes... again!

        I don't think that there are any Russians, and there ain't no Yanks... just corporate criminals playing with tanks. - Michael Been

        by gp39m on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 11:22:24 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I almost included Sir Paul (none)
      Who I'm quite a fan of - but I may not have anything after 'Flowers in the Dirt' - oh, and 'Wingspan'.

      Right now I'm down on him because he helped put together Live8 and didn't even ask Ringo to play.

      "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

      by Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 01:06:18 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Sorry (none)
      but this isn't rock, it's pop.

      As long as I count the votes, what are you going to do about it? - William Marcy Tweed

      by sidnora on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 02:33:25 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  tie (none)
    Blood on the Tracks
    Blonde on Blonde

    Third place: Everything else

    "Don't get mad. Don't get even. Just get elected, then get even." --James Carville

    by MN camera on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 10:15:32 AM PDT

  •  it's not in the poll (none)
    I know this statement might not earn me many fans here, but I really, really, really, really like World Gone Wrong.  I'm not sure I'd call it my absolute all-time favorite, but I'm also not sure what my absolute all-time favorite is.  I just know I would've put World Gone Wrong in the poll.  

    That said, I'm willing to admit that I have rather odd taste in just about everything.

  •  Blood on the Tracks (none)
    Although my Email address at the various ISPs I've had in my years on the Internets has always been some variant of "Highway61man."

    I don't think that there are any Russians, and there ain't no Yanks... just corporate criminals playing with tanks. - Michael Been

    by gp39m on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 11:16:18 AM PDT

  •  I have to put in for Another Side (none)

    Great, timeless songs.

    Let the great world spin for ever down the ringing grooves of change. - Tennyson

    by bumblebums on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 11:37:59 AM PDT

  •  Mark Knopfler and Mick Taylor (none)
    on guitar. Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare on rhythym.

    Infidels, '83.

    Anything by Loudon Wainwright III

    by Earl on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 12:15:55 PM PDT

  •  Highway 61 Revisited (none)
    Like A Rolling Stone is the single greatest song in history.

    In a way, it's too bad that LARS is on this album.  Because only in comparison to the masterpiece do Desolation Row, Ballad Of A Thin Man, Queen Jane Approximately, Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues, and It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry pale by comparison.

    I agree that Blood On The Tracks is as gut-wrenching a set as anything ever sung, and for anyone else it would be the best thing ever.  But not for Dylan.

    Props also to the wondrous Richard Thompson.  I've seen him at least half a dozen times.  At one of them, I was close enough to see the sweat rolling down his arm as he played.

    You're only young once, but you can be immature forever -- Larry Andersen

    by N in Seattle on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 01:07:03 PM PDT

    •  Mostly agree with what you say (none)
      except that I don't find the tracks you mention paling by comparison to LARS, they still peel my skin off and awake my heart whenever I hear them, perhaps even more than LARS (because I've heard it a hundred times on the radio).

      "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

      by Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 01:14:06 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Greil Marcus (none)
        Have you read Greil Marcus' book, Like a Rolling Stone?  It's something of a romanticised history of the song -- or at least, how the song changed music.  I picked up the book at the airport because I needed something to read, and it was about the only interesting looking thing in the store, but it did turn out better than I'd imagined.

        Although the masters make the rules / For the wise men and the fools / I got nothing, Ma, to live up to. (Dylan)

        by teedz on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 01:41:44 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I like Greil Marcus (none)
          He is the kind of rock writer I aspire towards. I've read three of his books, and went to see him speak once. But I just read a 2-page excerpt from the book you mention, and I think he's starting to let his style get in the way of the subject.

          After what you said, I'll read the first several pages in a bookstore to see if I like it. What I really want to read is 'Chronicles'.

          The best Dylan bio I've read is 'Behind the Shades'. But he's too complex to ever be fully captured between two covers.

          "Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them" Albert Einstein

          by Brecht on Sat Aug 27, 2005 at 02:08:00 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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