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The Newsweek poll now joins TIME (38%), ARG (36%) and NY Times/CBS (36%) in showing the 42% from Gallup was an outlier.
Bush's approval rating has taken a slight dip since the last NEWSWEEK Poll in mid-August. While 38 percent of respondents approved and 55 percent disapproved of his job performance back then, now 36 percent approve and 56 percent disapprove. That approval figure nearly matches the president's all-time low of 35 percent in May. Some potential factors contributing to that slippage: his handling of the economy (with 37 percent approving and 58 percent disapproving) and the situation in Iraq (31 percent v. 63 percent). Both of these results also approach all-time lows. The only semblance of a silver lining remains his handling of terrorism and homeland security, with 49 percent approving and 45 percent disapproving. But unfortunately for Bush, his approval rating on that issue edged downward as well, from 55 percent in mid-August. According to the poll, Democratic congressional candidates continue to hold an edge over their Republican rivals, by a 50-38 percent margin. That's consistent with other NEWSWEEK polls from earlier in the year.
So what's it all mean? It means plenty. Not only do Presidential preferences matter historically, but the current Republican strategery is coming unravelled. Some in the media get it; from the LA Times on Chris Shays:
Although he is not the first Republican to part company with Bush on the conduct of the war, Shays is the most prominent pro-war voice so far to call for a timetable for withdrawal.

And experts think there will be many Republican defections to come in the months leading up to the November election.

This reflects the backstepping that prominent conservatives (yes, conservatives) like McCain, Hagel and Lieberman have done on Iraq.

Why would Republicans (and the Party of One) feel forced to do so? Several things have coalesced over the summer:

  • Iraq is both a failure of Bush performance and policy
    While we can argue about how to get out, the conclusion denied by the WH is nonetheless conventional wisdom

  • Katrina was and is a failure both of Bush performance and policy
    The anniversary is coming, and the spotlight on NOLA will not be pretty

  • The war on terror is a failure of Bush performance and policy
    Most people do not think we are winning; those who buy the crap about iraq being part of it are just as likely to feel that way as those who don't.
The bottom line is that Republicans will start to try and shift the conversation to the future: what if Democrats get in to power? What's their solution? while ignoring the evidence before our eyes. It's as if none of the above has happened, to them. Thomas Mann (via Tom Schaller):
In his remarks, Mann also cautioned Democrats to not let the GOP somehow turn the election into a prospective, future-oriented question, but to make it as much a retrospective assessment of Bush in the Republicans. (No shocker there.) He also said Democrats ought to not only figure out a way to make Iraq--Bush's biggest liability--into as big a liability as possible. I would add that Democrats ought to figure out a way to make terrorism--still Bush's lone, if thin asset--a liability as well...with a concerted, simple message rolled out three weeks before the election: "Where's Osama?"
It's why Stu Rothenberg changes the status report this week:

Our latest race-by-race review of Congressional districts around the country convinces us that a Democratic wave is building and that the party is poised to take control of the House of Representatives in the fall. The only question now is the size of the November wave.
It's why the polls don't show the vaunted national security bounce for Bush. And it's why the irate moderates and centrists of CT voted for Ned Lamont instead of Joe Lieberman.

Update [2006-8-26 12:21:12 by DemFromCT]:: It's why Republican staffers on the Hill are nervous.

A political indicator of hard times ahead for Republicans is frantic activity during the current congressional recess by GOP staffers contemplating life under a Democratic-controlled House of Representatives.

Several Republican aides, including many working for House members from safe seats, are seeking employment elsewhere. Most of them have never worked under Democratic control and dread the prospect of minority status on Capitol Hill.

Other aides, working on House committee staffs, would lose those jobs in a Democratic House and want to transfer now to work for safe Republican members.

Look at NOLA. Look at Baghdad. And where's Osama? Republicans have no answer other than changing the subject. That's what happens with a failure of both performance and ideology. And the moderates and centrists that make up the majority of this country know it.

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:05 AM PDT.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Accountability (27+ / 0-)

    People like McCain or Shays who actively assisted in selling the Iraq War to "moderates" cannot be allowed to simply "change their minds" on the subject as is politically expedient.  This is, in part, their war.  They need to own up to it.

    Laffey for Rhode Island Senate

    by bink on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 08:58:21 AM PDT

    •  Good point (4+ / 0-)

      and the "politically expedient" part is what always kills me. Not because it's the right thing to do for someone with a conscience--but because it might cost votes. Real profiles in courage, these guys.

      And heck, I'm all for changing your mind on the war. Another voice for withdrawal is another voice for withdrawal--I'll take it. But I would hope there's a bigger price for them to pay than losing face--that they'd never win an election ever again. I know that's not gonna happen (there's still some very stupid people out there), but this administration and Congress has royally screwed up the world, and it should be about more than just  some stupid magazine headline that reads "Is politics more partisan than ever?" or something like that.

      •  yes (0+ / 0-)

        yes - "it's the mentality stupid - er, the stupid mentality" that makes it a challenge to get democrats instead of republicons elected.

        it would seem we'd have the 51% on our side though the next few elections.  if not, and if my wife didn't have all her family nearby, or if i were not married lets say, i'd certainly become an expatriate and become a citizen of some other country.

        •  Expatriation (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MtMan

          has looked ever so good the last 6 years, so much so that I went back to school two years ago to retrain in a field my preferred new homeland has a shortage in.

          After seeing Bushco steal a second election, I felt certain the United States could never recover in my lifetime from the ills wreaked upon it by those in power.  I'll finish up my retraining in 9 more months, but if a wave of sanity prevails in November, maybe there won't be so strong an attraction to move...

          Got a problem with my posts? Email me, and let's resolve it.

          by drbloodaxe on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 05:35:01 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Flip floppers (6+ / 0-)

      They need to be labelled as such and hard.  The people need to be reminded that while these clowns were shoving roses up our asses (stem side first, thorns and all) and telling us how wonderful everything is Democrats were warning us.

      SAY NO 2 JOE. VOTE 4 NED INSTEAD!!! -8.75, -8.00

      by DisNoir36 on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:09:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Confessions of a hopeless optimist (9+ / 0-)

        After the crushing defeat of Al Gore, and the insane stupidity of John Kerry's loss, I have spent the past 6 years in a state of suspended animation.  I couldn't believe the things I have seen happen in my America.

        Now, as the good news begins to accumulate, I am starting to feel the stirrings of hope. If my fellow citizens let me down this time, I have no idea what I will do, but I can guarantee, it will not be pretty.

        Can I start to really hope, yet?

        •  I suggest (3+ / 0-)

          you hold it off until November 8.

          SAY NO 2 JOE. VOTE 4 NED INSTEAD!!! -8.75, -8.00

          by DisNoir36 on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:18:29 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Well the President has lost hope! (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          desordre remplir, Granny Doc

          Finally

          These aren’t joyous times, sez W.  

          Just wait till November Mr. President.  And, remind every person you know the President said 'These aren't joyous times.' All brought to you by Bush and the Republicans.  

          'Events are in the saddle and ride mankind.' Emerson

          by deepsouthdoug on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:27:15 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Cautiously, Granny Doc (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Doc Allen, RAZE, Granny Doc, Tailspinterry

          I am reluctant to let the hope become too intense.  I've done it before, and the one time it actually did not get dashed was Lamont's win in the CT primary.  But then madman Joe has made a fine mess of that.

          No, I'm keeping a vigilant eye on what is happening and holding back that crazy hope for a while longer.

          It's no disgrace not to be able to run a country nowadays, but it is a disgrace to keep on trying when you know you can't. ~ Will Rogers

          by vigilant meerkat on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:00:34 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  me too (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            vigilant meerkat, Tailspinterry

            I am cautiously optimistic.
            As I remember too well the pain and the tears of previous elections. But I will still work hard for the candidates in my state, etc..but be cautiously optimistic with a positive attitude. But I guess I have learned to be quite realistic too from experience. I have been involved as a volunteer in politics for 30 years so I have seen the spectrum of ups and downs in election cycles.

            Carry the battle to them. Don't let them bring it to you. Put them on the defensive and don't ever apologize for anything. - Harry S. Truman

            by wishingwell on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 11:31:59 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I agree (0+ / 0-)

              Working hard is necessary, always.  We'll never get there by wishing.  We have to get the checks in the mail and the feet on the ground in order to win.  I commend you for your 30 year's of volunteering -- impressive.

              It's no disgrace not to be able to run a country nowadays, but it is a disgrace to keep on trying when you know you can't. ~ Will Rogers

              by vigilant meerkat on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 11:47:05 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I wish I could be optimistic, but... (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                vigilant meerkat

                I remember the hostages released from Iran.

                I wouldn't be surprised if in the final days of some election, Osama is pulled out of the hat!

                That's why we have to hammer away at the Katrina debacle and domestic issues as well.  We have to hammer away at the cost of the Iraq war, lives, increasing tensions in the Middle East, no real terrorist arrests in the US.  You guys all know what I mean.

                This bunch in DC have me more scared than the terrorists!  :(!  

                "Sentiment without action is the ruin of the soul. One brave deed is worth a thousand books." Edward Abbey

                by Maty on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:47:39 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

        •  well if i were single (0+ / 0-)

          well if i were single, and the GOP continues to wreck the Country, i'd without any doubt find another country to live in.  canada.  australia.  anywhere but here in "ugly" america.  (ugly defined as GOP controlled.)

          •  My fantasy has always been (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            maryru, RAZE

            to re-settle in New Zeland.  It may be the most beautiful place on earth.  And this judgement comes from someone who has been just about everywhere.

            •  Interesting you mentioned New Zealand (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Granny Doc

              As some Bush supporter called into CSPAN yesterday,  who now lives in the U.S.  but was born in New Zealand. He said he  prefers the USA because New Zealand is too liberal. So New Zealand is sounding good.

              Carry the battle to them. Don't let them bring it to you. Put them on the defensive and don't ever apologize for anything. - Harry S. Truman

              by wishingwell on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 11:33:50 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Liberal? (0+ / 0-)

                Just because the last election for Prime Minister was between an atheist and an agnostic? Heaven forbid.

                No doubt he's a member of the Destiny Church and maybe an ex-New Zealand First'er.

                Got a problem with my posts? Email me, and let's resolve it.

                by drbloodaxe on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 05:42:22 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

            •  You nailed it (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Granny Doc

              As the kiwis call it, 'Godzone'...

              Despite the flooding, Christchurch and the rest of South Island still look ever so much nicer than the States under His Majesty, Curious George.

              They've got medical personnel shortages, and not enough cops, but maybe we could start a colony of expats.  I'd like to take myself to the Nurse Practitioner level, live somewhere in Otago maybe.

              Got a problem with my posts? Email me, and let's resolve it.

              by drbloodaxe on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 05:40:45 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  but when they get on the bandwagon (0+ / 0-)

        but when they get on the bandwagon - it shows the less apt to change voters what a crock the anti-"liberal" message is.  and that's when voters swing.  when they get that sinking feeling in their guts that they've been hoodwinked.  we've known it for some time.  but it is better late than never with pro-bush lemmings.

      •  Actions speak louder than words (0+ / 0-)

        Let's just hope they keep their promises after the election.

        "When all else fails try following directions"

        by SoldiersInRevolt on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:22:26 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  What does flipflopping on Iraq say (0+ / 0-)

      about how a preemptive war with Iran would go over?

      With GOP Congresscritters running from Iraq as fast a possible, what does that do to Rove's Iran strategy?

      It isn't going to work, which doesn't mean it isn't going to happen.

      As of this moment I'd say 18 seats for the Dems, with a possibility of up to 33.  Outside chance it goes even higher.  And 4-7 Senate seats.

      "False language, evil in itself, infects the soul with evil." ----Socrates

      by Mimikatz on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:22:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  perspective, communication, and flip flopping (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      iliketodrum

      Accountability is the buzzword that Democrats need to learn to use, and did not use in 2004 when it was staring them right in the face. (So many concepts in 2004 were not sound bites. Here was one that was, and made the most important case to be made).

      Re polls, and counting chicken. The President's approval rating is not that much lower than it was in the spring of 2004.  Since then it has become apparent that the economy is growing by reckless deficit spending to enable the wealthy (even fed chairman Ben Bernanke acknowledged this) while at the same time real wages have fallen - thus Americans are worse off.  Iraq has since become a more apparent disaster, and very unpopular.  Our policies and international rhetoric are foolishly helping to de radicalize, in the eyes of much of the world, what is otherwise a fringe, if very dangerous, radical terrorist element. Leadership? Contrast the President and current Congress' do nothing and wishy washy stance on global warming with inflexible policies elsewhere, while American see the hotter summers, Katrina, and nearly every scientist on the face of the planet, not paid for directly by pro CO2 corporations, has long been in basic agreement on the issue.

      The President has blantantly violated the U.S. Constitution, and has repeatedly mislead the America voter about it, and the battle against terrorism both.  Here, for example, is what he said about the recent Court ruling on the matter:

      We strongly believe it's constitutional and if al Qaeda is calling into the United States we want to know why they're calling.

      Here are the facts.

      This case has not been effectively made.  Diarists have talked about making it. But, once again, where is the DNC making this case? Where are prominent democratic leaders -- in the news,  on the TV, busy explaining their "perception" of politics, handicapping the races, telling voters what they do think, or concluding things that they think are already obvious.  FISA, which the President's program blantantly violated according now to even the administration itself (they just argue that they nevertheless have the right) already allows us to do what the President just said and more. What is also does, is provide a check upon the clandestine powers of the President so that what the President says is being done, is being done (and what our entire system of government has been based upon for over 200 years).

      The goal should be be to relate things that make the case. That American voters can relate to and not feel like they are being told to do or what to think. And that reach out to independents and republicans, rather than making them feel defensive or otherwise otherwise unwittingly insulting them.  And of course it should always be made in a way that ties in the current far right Congress, which has accomodated these policies and many others, and has itself only exacerbated the problem. (Congress is the issue right now, after all.)

      Another quick point on Iraq that may be worth repeatedly making, because, once again, it ties into the larger pattern:

      The President, backed by the Congressional Leadership, has now repeatedly stated
      "we will not leave so long as I'm president." First mistake -- they originally "knew" whatever it was we are there to achieve WOULD BE accomplished in no time. They were completely wrong. ("Deeply, profoundly, and consistently," in the words of Karl Rove.) Second mistakes -- now they nevertheless "know" the exact opposite with equal certainty; that whatever we are there to accomplish WON'T BE accomplished in the next two and a half years, so much so that they continue to also repeatedly tell the Iraqis this, making them think they will continue to have us as a crutch.

      This is all part of the larger pattern that democrats have to repeatedly show (notice how republicans always try to tie democrats statements and actions to a "larger pattern"? Why do you think they do that? Why do you suppose they win, even when they are very wrong and don't have the facts on their side?)

      Once again, the right wing leadership may be very earnest, and even trying (remember, the goal is to reach independents and republicans, not piss them off) but it has not made America safer. The President's latest stance on Iraq, once again, shows that when it comes to national security, not only does the current leadership confuse violating our basic Constitutional principles with fighting terrorism, but they just don't know what they are doing.

      •  The point (0+ / 0-)

        Of suggesting that the President's poll numbers, while lower now, were also low in the spring of 2004, is to suggest that it is important to focus on making the case as to why this administration is so bad, and to do it in a way that does not insult those that otherwise tend to support republican candidates (including what are a lot of current far right wing membes of Congress).

        Two points from the above comment that may have gotten lost in its length.

        First, props to the idea of accountability. It is essential in government, and essential to communicate to voters (and was essential in 2004.)

        Second, helping to frame Iraq as part of a persistent, and larger pattern that the current far right wing "leadership," atrocious domestic policies and blatant disregard for the Constitution aside, talks a good game, but does not know what it is doing with respect to combatting terrorism, and is not making America safer.

        Take Iraq:

        The President, backed by the Congressional Leadership, has now repeatedly stated
        "we will not leave so long as I'm president." First mistake -- they originally "knew" whatever it was we are there to achieve WOULD BE accomplished in no time. They were completely wrong. ("Deeply, profoundly, and consistently," in the words of Karl Rove.) Second mistakes -- now they nevertheless "know" the exact opposite with equal certainty; that whatever we are there to accomplish WON'T BE accomplished in the next two and a half years, so much so that they continue to also repeatedly tell the Iraqis this, making them think they will continue to have us as a crutch.

    •  What's a moderate? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wishingwell, hoplite9

      Oxford American Dictionary tells us that it means "keeping or kept within reasonable limits, not extreme or excessive."  Now, please tell me.  Is that what the war on Iraq is?  Moderate?  If that's the current definition of moderation, I'd like to know what extremism means.  It must mean the opposite, or allowing the inspectors to finish their job of looking for wmd's and working with allies to solve problems and avoid war.  When an irrational war is described as moderate, we can only assume that the opposite, or working for a rational and peaceful solution must be the new extremism.  Those of us who've been around for a while and have some experience with the English language know that this new vocabulary doesn't seem to fit reality.  So let's return to some sanity and rescue the English language from the new doublespeak that has infected our vocabulary and that is being used to conceal the truth of what is happening to the U.S.A.  Shakespeare got it right when he said that a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.  We know that the war on Iraq is not an accurate example of political moderation, but let's start using the correct words to describe it.  While we're at it, why don't we pin those words on culprits like Chris Shays and John McCain who have been hiding their extremism under the sham label of moderation for far too long.

  •  We need to get these two stories out (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Iowa Boy

    We need to get these two stories across to more people - my last two diary entries:

    http://www.dailykos.com/...

    Sorry for tooting my own horn, but it's true, if Bush is still doing ok on the "tough on terror" B.S.

    •  Bush policies ensure future terror (6+ / 0-)

       We should have gone to Afghanistan, kicked ass, then come right home. Everyone who isn't breathing through their mouth and reading People magazine has figured out that Iraq is in a civil war and that we're getting another Afghanistan/Somalia style failed state in western Iraq.

       I hammer this point every time someone brings up the "war on terror". If 25k jihad vacationists going to Afghanistan, which didn't share their language or Wahabi tendencies) got us the first Trade Center bombing, Kenya and Tanzania, the Cole, and 9/11 ... well ... 3/11, 7/7, and many, many, many more are going to be the result when a centralized, Arab speaking mess has been created right in the middle of the region.

       Oh, and gotta love the domestic angle, too. A lot of our guys spent a little time on the ground during Desert Storm and presto - Oklahoma City and the D.C. sniper. Now children, who can tell me how 250k guys who've been shot at and bombed on the regular for years are going to act when people cut them off in traffic?

       Great Leader? NOT! Great Terrorist Facilitator is a better description.

      "Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise" - U.S. Constitution author and fourth President James Madison

      by Iowa Boy on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:18:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  A guy I know (0+ / 0-)

        came back on leave from Iraq, and was cut off by a guy on the interstate in Ohio. He reverted into offensive mode, chased the guy down and ran him off the road. This wasn't a young kid. This was a 46 year old National Guard reservist, who had been serving for 5 months in Ramahdi.

        Benjamin Franklin said "The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results." Sounds like Bush's Iraq Policy.

        by Zippity on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:50:29 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  MSM bias ... (10+ / 0-)

    There was a WashPost article this morning entitled Katrina's Damage Lingers For Bush: Many See Storm as President's Undoing. In this story, two 'neutral' people were quoted (from polling organizations) but all the rest of the quotations were from Republican politicians.  Hmmm ... all of them spinning like crazy. Is that really a "news" story when only the Republican viewpoint is given a hearing?

    Well, why the comment here.  This comment

    The only semblance of a silver lining remains his handling of terrorism and homeland security

    got to me.  Why?  Because, the sentence only states the "only semblance of a silver lining", leaving it grammatically as an absolute case.  I might have written it as "the only semblance of a silver lining for the Bush-Cheney cabal and their Republican co-conspirators" but that might not have fit well in a news report.  But, the journalist should have written "The only semblance of a silver lining for the Administration ..." or "for Bush's handlers ..."  or such ... As is, it is a horrible presentation of the discussion and is, in a not-so-subtle way, evidence of inherent bias in the reporting.

    4 July 2006, Independence Day ... Day 1757, A count worth keeping? Or, Osama Bin Forgotten?

    by besieged by bush on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:00:30 AM PDT

    •  Totally agree... (2+ / 0-)

      did you see CNN this week absolutely loving that Gallup generic poll that had Dems and Repugs at 43-42%, while they completely ignored the other three polls that had Dems up by at least 9?  

      CNN used to be my television news of choice, but anymore they have been Fox-lite.  The only television news I watch now is Hardball and Olbermann.  (Yes, I know Hardball can be bad too but I think Matthews has been doing a solid job since the Conn primary).  

      The Dems have great VP candidates for 2008: Richardson, Bayh, Clark, Sebelius, etc, but who's going to head the ticket?

      by DemBrock on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 02:09:46 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I've notice a little trend that no one seems to (13+ / 0-)

    be talking about in GOP speeches which is that "energy independence" now seems to be a core theme in their stump speeches.  Check out the "wink" video in Feldman's diary and listen to what Allen is saying.  

    They are running away from the President and they are stealing a platform from our party to do it.

    Democrats definitely need to keep this race focused on the past.  I think we should steal the GOP line "Elections Have Consequences" and list all the consequences of having a GOP controlled government.

    •  What's the GOP energy policy been... (3+ / 0-)

      ... if not propping up tyrannies in the Middle East?  Think we'd be in Iraq if not for oil?  Think Iran would matter if not for oil?

      The Dems' rejoinder is that the GOP idea of an energy policy was invading Iraq.

      The GOP has never had an energy policy other than to prop up and subsidize the oil states and American oil companies and interests.

      "Energy independence," my ass.

      "I intend to live forever. So far, so good." Steven Wright

      by gsbadj on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:10:06 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  energy independence through using less energy (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      peraspera, inclusiveheart

      energy independence through using less energy should be our message.  not by drilling more wells and creating more katrinas.

      •  Alternative, renewable energy (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        inclusiveheart, majcmb1, DSPS owl, MtMan

        is the long term answer.  There were only so many dinosaurs.

        •  and the dinos went extinct - possibly from climat (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          inclusiveheart

          and the dinos went extinct - possibly from climate change

        •  It is inevitable (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          bloomer 101, Granny Doc, drbloodaxe, MtMan

          and about the only thing I regret is that we have wasted thirty years since it was obvious, not able to penetrate the vested interest's control over what they offer us.

          Two principles will emerge if we are to survive:

          1. Live within the "solar budget" of the bioregion. Every bioregion has a certain amount of solar "income." If you use more energy than can be converted from that income, you are overspent and unsustainable. Implication: some places we are living in dense populations now can not support that many people.
          1. Decentralized energy production is essential. Every microclimate has a most-efficient conversion (and correlated distribution system) of its solar income. No one technology is THE answer.

          Guess what, when individuals and communities control their energy production, it looks a lot like democracy instead of fascism.

          (PC: -5.75, -6.56) Good men through the ages, tryin' to find the sun, still I wonder, still I wonder, who'll stop the rain? -J. Fogerty

          by RichRandal on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:08:50 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  The GOP answer to "energy independence" (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Granny Doc, drbloodaxe, MtMan

        is drilling in ANWR and in costal waters - that is one reason they like this issue.  They aren't going to tell people to use less.  They are telling people there is more here!  Sort of a "drill it over here so we don't have to drill it over there" strategy.

    •  Puhleeze (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      inclusiveheart

      Will anyone seriously believe them now?

      I almost hope they do campaign on that.  Nobody will believe a word they say, will take it as election year promises (empty) and go vote for someone else who doesn't have to pander to them.

      Plus the more they spend on that, the less they spend on other issues.

      Seriously, that's like a crack addict telling us it's time to crack down on drugs.

      SAY NO 2 JOE. VOTE 4 NED INSTEAD!!! -8.75, -8.00

      by DisNoir36 on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:21:40 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well it is like a crack addict cracking down on (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        vigilant meerkat

        drugs you are right.

        But these people are lying hucksters and some people will believe them.

        Here is the link to the Allen video: Allen Video

        He is the third GOP candidate that I have heard make this speech which is essentially our speech.

        Also please note that since gas prices have gone up, public support for drilling in the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge has increased.

        The GOP is turning this sow's ear into another silk purse for the Oil Lobby.

        •  Great policy (0+ / 0-)

          Also please note that since gas prices have gone up, public support for drilling in the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge has increased.

          Tell a diabetic to grow their own sugar cane rather than importing it from another country.

          Does nothing to solve the problem and infact makes it worse.

          SAY NO 2 JOE. VOTE 4 NED INSTEAD!!! -8.75, -8.00

          by DisNoir36 on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:41:13 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Well it is great a great policy if you believe (0+ / 0-)

            that your constituents are the oil lobby.

            A point that should be clarified for the American people.  The only people who gain from this deal with the devil is Big Oil and their lackey Senators and Congressmen.  There is no benefit for America.

            •  I don't understand why (4+ / 0-)

              Although estimates vary, the amount of oil in ANWAR is so low - 6 to 18 months supply - that the cost of drilling is very high.  I have always thought ANWAR is just a symbol for breaking the environmental community.  If they can make it there, they can make it anywhere...

              •  Why is a good question. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Granny Doc

                I think the environmental lobby thing is a sideshow though.  It probably has more to do with the fact that so many people would profit from the contracts even if in the end it turns out to be totally unprofitable.  I think that much of the corporate-think has gotten so short-sighted that even a project that looks like a long-term loser will be considered for the andticipated short-term gains.  One such gain would probably be a spike in oil stock prices if they won that battle.  A lot of people would make a lot of money in one day just on that area being opened up.

                If the big oil companies were at all interested in looking farther forward than the next quarterly earnings, they would be investing heavily in alternative energy. But they aren't.  They are interested in short-term profit-taking.  It is sort of carpe diem on steriods.

    •  Another Trend... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      inclusiveheart, majcmb1

      that seems to have escaped scrutiny...the most common rallying cry I hear is a variation of "...ideas we can all support regardless of party" or "...bring all people together to form a consensus without partisan blah, blah, blah...."

      BUT who is making these statements? Virtually EVERY republican is saying "...bipartisan" while hardly any democrats are flying that flag (Joementum excl.) The obvious conclusion is that not even the republican candidates themselves can muster the gall to declare "republican ideas" are the way to go -- not only are they running away from Bush, they are running away from themselves.

      --------
      When I said, 'Macaca', I meant: 'Mohawk'.
      When I said 'Welcome to America', I meant: 'Fuck-off foreign scum'. -- George Allen

      by PBJ Diddy on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:53:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I have noticed that trend too. (0+ / 0-)

        Another canard designed to make people think that the Democrats had control of the Congress all this time.  I keep hearing them make passing comments about what people like Harry Reid should have done to stop them and stuff.  It is really bizarre. Like they are saying, "they should have done something to stop me from passing that wretched Medicare bill!"

      •  In the latest DeWine ad (0+ / 0-)

        in Ohio, (DeWine (R) vs Sherrod Brown (D)), DeWine never mentions he is a republican, and a written tagline at the end of the commercial proclaims him an 'Independent Fighter' for the people.

        I'm glad to see they're having to run from their own party, but sad to think that some people will actually be fooled by such simpleton tricks in November.

        Got a problem with my posts? Email me, and let's resolve it.

        by drbloodaxe on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 05:50:55 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I've been wondering if the President's (12+ / 0-)

    vaunted terrorism "credentials" have lost all their power.  Even if he still gets relatively high marks on terrorism, the issue doesn't loom quite as large in the national imagination.

    All I want for Christmas is subpeona power.

    •  Where is Osama? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DCDemocrat, DSPS owl

      and why does the Bushco cabal corporations steal our tax-payer monies from our military and the poor Afghanis and Iraqis and why are they not being investigated by our congresscritters and media is a question that our returning military would like answered.  They also, would like to know why Bushco/Rummy got away with bombing civilian areas this spring in Afghanistan and turning the populace against our soldiers?  Where are the War Crime and War profiteering charges against the Bushco henchmen and supporters?    KBR, Haliburton, Bechtel and other Cheney-Bushco no-bid companies  either totally do not provide or sub-sub contract all services until they are worthless such as supplies, equipment, security and especially infrastructure repair for the poor citizens.  We ought to be ashamed and investigating our stolen monies and international respect.  My Staff Sgt. son and his guys that returned last month from Afghanistan had the option and chose to give up their 20 year National Guard plans as 2nd careers.  The poor cheated people of Afghanistan and Iraq do not have that option.  Where in the hell is our honor and integrity?

  •  more sign of the times (6+ / 0-)

    from an unhappy Novak:

    A political indicator of hard times ahead for Republicans is frantic activity during the current congressional recess by GOP staffers contemplating life under a Democratic-controlled House of Representatives.

    Several Republican aides, including many working for House members from safe seats, are seeking employment elsewhere. Most of them have never worked under Democratic control and dread the prospect of minority status on Capitol Hill.

    Other aides, working on House committee staffs, would lose those jobs in a Democratic House and want to transfer now to work for safe Republican members.

    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

    by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:04:48 AM PDT

  •  How about "Got Osama ?" (10+ / 0-)

    like the milk commercials ?

    Also Shays needs to go regardless of his recent turnaround.

    •  "Flip-flop"... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      peraspera

      ... is the buzzword.

      "I intend to live forever. So far, so good." Steven Wright

      by gsbadj on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:11:25 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Guilty of aggressive war ... (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        CocoaLove, majcmb1, DSPS owl, drbloodaxe

        ... codified at Nuremberg as a Crime Against Humanity.

        Take your pick for buzzphrase:  War Criminal or Crimes Against Humanity.

        The war was a blatant lie and a perversion of governance.  Tens of thousands of people are dead because of it.  That is not a "flip-flop".  That is both a crime and a bottomless moral failure.  Even the God of their dreams does not give them a "do-over" for killing with intent to kill.  People with names and families and histories and futures died at the hands of other people.  Someone is responsible.  Who?

        W taught Pfc Green everything: One planned and enacted the rape of a girl and the murder of her family. The other raped a country. Eerily parallel crimes

        by Yellow Canary on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:58:29 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Would make great billboard ads (6+ / 0-)

      Milk cartons with Osama's face asking where he is and why Republicans aren't looking for him.

      SAY NO 2 JOE. VOTE 4 NED INSTEAD!!! -8.75, -8.00

      by DisNoir36 on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:22:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Have you seen this man? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        wishingwell

        George Bush hasn't.

        "Don't blame me, I voted for the smart guy."

        by frsbdg on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:50:08 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Osama's coming out in October (0+ / 0-)

        Osama's going to be captured/killed/die in October for an October surprise, just in time to bolster the tough on terrorism theme.  He's been kept as an ace in the hole for when times get truly tough for this administration.  He's had the illusion of freedom, but that's going to end when Rove makes the decision they need to capture/kill him to preserve their majority.

        Even if not, Osama is going to make videos that will come out bolstering the Republicans, because they're his best friends.  They have helped him and his cause become far more powerful than any Democrat could have.  10 out of 10 terrorists support Bush.

    •  or "got security" (0+ / 0-)

      or "got security"

    •  And if we do 'get Osama' just before Nov? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ColoTim

      I think the "Where's Osama" message has to have a second part - that says "and oh, by the way, if you do find him - thank us Dems and the pressure we put on you to allocate the resources to do it"  (I know - way too long a statement - but something to that effect) - Otherwise - what do you say when they pull the rabbit out of the hat?  Have to plant the idea that we are forcing him to go back and put time, energy, money and resources into the search, and but for the pressure, nothing would have changed.

      "That's hard to explain without using the phrase 'you gullible toad.'" Dilbert

      by gbussey on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:32:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Exactly Right (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Iowa Boy, Heyroot

      One thing the Repugs have over Dems is message discipline. They encapsulate their message into a bullet point, and distribute it to their politicians as well as the right-wing echo chamber. Take "cut and run" as an example. It is not an accurate portrayal of the Democratic position, but it has been repeated over, and over, and over to the point where it has become a catch phrase (like "where's the beef?"). For all the "voting Democratic will emolden the terrorists," nothing can compare to the simple fact that the man who orchestrated the 9/11 attacks got away with it. Five years later, he remains at large. That is a monumental failure of both policy and performance, and we should hang it around their necks like an anvil.

      I like the "Got Osama?" theme, because it's short and catchy, echoing the "Got Milk?" catch phrase that is already out there in the public consciousness.

      "Don't blame me, I voted for the smart guy."

      by frsbdg on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:49:28 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  like this? (0+ / 0-)

      Image Hosted by ImageShack.us


      Ignorance is, if not bliss, then at least widespread - Josh Marshall

      by AlyoshaKaramazov on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 11:33:27 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  OT: Moderates are not Centrists, and vice versa (6+ / 0-)

    I just wrote in another thread that the real battle, I believe, right now that is occuring within the Democratic Party is that that real moderates (Webb, Tester, Lamont, Hackett, etc) are starting to fight back and reclaim their positions as moderate from the Centrists (HRC, DLC'ers, etc). A moderate would react to the excesses of the Republicans with a strong aversion to just how extreme it is. Centrists would not because they are too busy focused on their own fiefdom or political calculus. I believe Sirota had it right recently when he said, to paraphrase his idea, that the problem is that moderation and its definition have been defined according to what the extremists think

    Fear is not a winning strategy.

    by bruh1 on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:07:59 AM PDT

    •  whatever the original meaning (and Humpty Dumpty (0+ / 0-)
      was correct - meanings change), moderates are Dems and centrists are Rs. The twain shall never meet.

      A word of advice if you speak to leaders of the Republican Main Street Partnership. Do not use the word moderate when talking about the organization's politics.

      Members prefer being described as centrists, because the moderate tag conjures up thoughts of abortion and gay rights. And Main Street does not take a position on either of these issues.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:13:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  that is interesting (0+ / 0-)

        as I have noticed that some Republicans liked to be called Centrists but get quite upset if called Moderates. Reading this quote, I now understand more about that.

        Carry the battle to them. Don't let them bring it to you. Put them on the defensive and don't ever apologize for anything. - Harry S. Truman

        by wishingwell on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 11:57:32 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  if definitions are malleable (0+ / 0-)

        then why cant we seek to change it back to where it should be? isn't that the lesson of bush: that the problem with triangulation is that it assumes static definitions, but bush is the victory of relativism because it proves definitions are indeed malleable. The only one who haven't caught on to this, I believe, are democratis.  As a Bush opperative (during the whole "faith based" vs "reality based" discussion)elegantly explained. Our definition indeed more accurately reflects real moderation- so why not fight to regain the territory rather than ceed it to the Republicans?

        Fear is not a winning strategy.

        by bruh1 on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 01:34:51 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  But... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BennyAbelard, peraspera

    but Gallup had him at 42%! And the almighty CNN said he was rebounding...HE IS LOVED!

    To quote Richard Gere in the movie And the Band Played On: "The party is over."

  •  Here Is What Is Important To Remember.... (11+ / 0-)

    A Democratic majority in the House and Senate becomes infinitely more possible if we STAY on offense. Staying on offense effectively neutralized the natural Republican advantage that would have come politically from the London plane arrests.

    Look at the electoral landscape. Are the GOP making ground in any realistic way in the Senate? The best they can hope for is that one of their incumbents is only losing by eight points, instead of twelve? Can you identify a Democratic Senate seat that is in grave danger (maybe...and only maybe...New Jersey)? Meanwhile, we have five GOP-held seats which range from tossup to leaning Democratic. And we are gaining traction in three more races, where the polls are moving our direction (VA, TN, and NV).

    In the House, every change to a race's status that Charlie Cook has made in the past two-plus months has been in the favor of the Democrats. No exceptions.

    Stay on offense. Play like you are down a touchdown, and in the words of the Coach in Remember the Titans, "Run it up. Leave no doubt."

    "It. Is. About. Winning."

    by Steve Singiser on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:09:44 AM PDT

  •  It's Thomas Mann's prescription that worries me (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Radiowalla, sunflight, DSPS owl, Iowa Boy

    Votes on the past -- or "throw the bums out" elections -- are emotionally negative.  They can drive down voting numbers, and don't build legislative mandates.  

    The disgusted and motivated vote will turn out, but we need enthusiasm beyond election day and into the next Congress.  I'd still like to hear more (any) positive, national vision messages from Democrats.  In the rhetorical department, maybe the Party could crank up a "roll up our sleeves" sentiment in the electorate.  That might ensure the "wave" the pollsters are predicting, and create political consensus for progressive legislation in the new Democratic Congress.

    •  Democratic Message (0+ / 0-)

      Here it is:

      http://www.democrats.org/...

      The problem is, how do Democrats insert this into the media narrative?  I can't think of a way that they can do it.  If Hilary Clinton gives a speech on her "Privacy Bill of Rights," CNN asks if she is "pandering" and then Adam Nagourney writes an article in the New York Times where "top Democrats" say that she is weakening our chances to retake the Senate in 2006.

      Laffey for Rhode Island Senate

      by bink on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:12:35 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Good point (0+ / 0-)

        Who's the one to deliver the message?  W/Cheney/Rummy are the natural point men for the Administration.

        But Kerry has his negatives that come with losing.  Hillary has her hate groups.  Reid doesn't always perfom with kind of fire that draws coverage.

        Maybe it's got to be a combination, a unified, coordinated thrust on all their parts.  That way, SOMEONE will appeal to each voter (we hope).

        "I intend to live forever. So far, so good." Steven Wright

        by gsbadj on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:19:12 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Are the "top Democrats" (0+ / 0-)

        quoted?  If so they need to put a sock in it.

        "In the beginning the universe was created. This has been widely criticized and generally regarded as a bad move." -- Douglas Adams

        by LithiumCola on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:28:25 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  It doesn't mention Iraq (0+ / 0-)

        And it is a vapid slogan.

        It is ok for domestic policy, but it needs to highlight a sensible resolution of Iraq and more use of diplomacy in the future.

        "False language, evil in itself, infects the soul with evil." ----Socrates

        by Mimikatz on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:32:27 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Oh, I don't know (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wishingwell

      1994 seemed to be a pretty strong "throw the bums out" election. There's a lot to be said for negative emotions. Bush won 2 elections on getting some bigtime negative voters out to the polls. So, don't sell negatives short. People will come out very enthusiastically (Gray Davis!) to throw out someone they think stinks. I am still of the opinion that Democrats merely have to be seen as a credible, alternative Government by comparison to win.

      Walking. It's the new driving.

      by Batfish on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:20:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The difference is "The Contract". (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DSPS owl

        Dems may not need anything so elaborate, but if they express a national vision for governance, it'll firm their footing for the next session and provide a more seamless transition into the presidential race.

        Grotesque as it was, the Contract for America galvanized that part of our electorate that is in control today, despite the missteps of the government shutdown and the impeachment.  I think Dean's got the idea with his 50-state strategy, but I'm not sure it'll ripen enough this fall to provide a legislative strategy.

    •  I said much the same thing... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mogolori

      please see my comment below.

      I agree completely.

      You can make it if you focus on connections, not on differences.
      -7.00, -6.77

      by sunflight on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:08:57 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  ignore the TV, go talk to conservatives (19+ / 0-)

     I'm conservative. Not an ignorant, chickenhawk, neocon conservative, but a "mind your own damn business and pay your bills" conservative. I'm white, middle aged, rural raised, gun owner, business owner, and Bush voter in 2000. Thusly I have much different conversations than those of you who are so liberal as to scorch plant life on your way to hug a tree, and this is what I'm hearing.

     My fundamentalist Christian former boss is pissed and he isn't the only one in their massive congregation. We've got a conservative Democratic house candidate here (no netroot support) and many are planning on protest voting.

     Bush got a whole lot of mojo for responding "Jesus" when asked about influences on foreign policy. I always ask about this - "Are you mad?" "Why?" "Because you just flat got worked by the Republican party". I use the word pandering quite often in conversation and I'm not talking about sex when I do so. I hope it gets them thinking ...

     The foreign policy guys? Oh, don't even get them started ... they're sick to death of it all - we've acted stupid for four years and the world is going to treat us stupid for the next forty. Bush squandered our superpower position in a foolish adventure that seems have have been calculated to enrich Halliburton stockholders at the expense of fifty years of careful diplomacy.

     The only ones who aren't planning on pressing real hard on  all the little blue levers are the real gun nut types. The recall each and every vote against the second ammendment and they're not going to let it go. Democrats here in rural areas get some guilt by association here and I don't have a good prescription for how to fix it.

     The TV guys never call me because my responses don't fit into thirty second sound bites ... but how many sound bite listeners are sound bite voters? Methinks even less than the 36% that still approve of Great Leader ...

    "Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise" - U.S. Constitution author and fourth President James Madison

    by Iowa Boy on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:10:59 AM PDT

    •  What You Are Hearing (12+ / 0-)

      I'm conservative. Not an ignorant, chickenhawk, neocon conservative, but a "mind your own damn business and pay your bills" conservative.

      This pretty much describes the political outlook of just about every "liberal" that I know.  And, I would suggest even further, that this is much truer about Daily Kos Democrats than many other parts of the party.

      Being a liberal is about responsibility.  It is about fulfilling your duties as a citizen.

      Long before we got into all of these weird issues regarding gay marriage and abortion, liberalism was recognized as "the political orientation of the middle class."

      It's the politics of being sensible and being decent.  In our form of economics, it's the politics of recognizing that both labor and capital play a role.

      As far as tree-hugging and the like, this kind of stuff is limited to a very small number of left-wingers ...  This is not the mainstream of American liberalism.

      American liberalism is the house with the white picket fence.

      Laffey for Rhode Island Senate

      by bink on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:16:11 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  hence (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        bink, Steve Singiser, DSPS owl
        my chosen title.

        "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

        by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:16:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  And some of us aren't hung up gun control either (5+ / 0-)

        Take environmental issues.  There is more than one kind of recreational user.  Some hunt, some hike, some bike.  It's all good.

        The Democratic middle is closer to conservative than the folks that have hijacked the GOP in the name of religion.

        Do the right thing 'casue it feels better.

        by John Boy on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:20:38 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Agree (5+ / 0-)

          I agree ...

          Honestly, I think it is great for rural folks to keep their firearms.  In the troubled municipality where I live -- Jersey City, NJ -- however, possession of handguns and the like is not appropriate.  In my view, this is an issue that should be decided by the states.

          Laffey for Rhode Island Senate

          by bink on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:22:31 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I wish every troller could see this!! (8+ / 0-)

            Everyone of those folks who hurl epithets and labels like confetti and then accuse the posters here of being closed minded, and marching in lock step to some far left liberal fantasy.

            Thank you, Iowa Boy.

            •  how to beat a troll senseless (7+ / 0-)

               I get a lot of those in person, Granny - its a knee jerk (emphasis: JERK) reaction from those who watch Bill O'Leily and Tardball with Chris Matthews. They can usually stay on focus for about three minutes before I corner them on some unsupportable point, and then its the 'zipper effect'. You only have to get them thinking a little bit before the tidal wave of doubt comes crashing ashore ... the lack of respect for the rule of law is the very best place to start, and once they backpedal its a good time to talk about foreign policy issues for three minutes without having dopey Chris Matthews yelling and redirecting, then the real squirming starts ...

              "Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise" - U.S. Constitution author and fourth President James Madison

              by Iowa Boy on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:36:31 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  I live in New Jersey,do you seriously (0+ / 0-)

            believe no one in the Garden State should be allowed to own a gun? If you do,you are the best friend the Rethugs have.

            •  Uh, No ... (0+ / 0-)

              But I believe that people in the state of New Jersey should have the right to regulate the possession of guns according the consensus of residents of our state.  Do you believe otherwise?  This is a democracy.  The people should decide.

              Laffey for Rhode Island Senate

              by bink on Sun Aug 27, 2006 at 06:23:50 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  Unfortunately (0+ / 0-)

            it is pretty clear that gun companies supersaturate the markets where there are few restrictions on guns, like some more rural and southern states, and thus winkingly support an illegal supply chain that takes those guns bought in rural Mississipppi and ships them off to Chicago, New York, Detroit or wherever they can cause a good lot of damage.

            "Quidquid dicendum est, libere dicam." -Cicero

            by BennyAbelard on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:56:39 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  guns are appropriate everywhere (0+ / 0-)

              And especially in Newark. If all of the good citizens were to arm themselves with quality pieces of equipment like the Glock 19, fill them up with frangible rounds like the Glazer Safety slug so as to limit ricochet and shoot through, and display some intolerance for misbehavior there would be one loud week, a few unfortunate mistakes, and then a massive outburst of good manners and civil behavior would promptly ensue ...

            "Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise" - U.S. Constitution author and fourth President James Madison

            by Iowa Boy on Sun Aug 27, 2006 at 10:54:06 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  three uses for a gun (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Steve Singiser, drbloodaxe
          1. sporting
          1. self defense
          1. citizens control the government

           Lots of those gun grabbers might get real interested in that last point here before too long :-) We'll try to keep the "We told you so" comments to a minimum ...

          "Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise" - U.S. Constitution author and fourth President James Madison

          by Iowa Boy on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:26:41 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Ya' still don't need AK 47's (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            yellowdog, DCDemocrat, goodasgold

            to take down a rabbit, tho'.

            •  Well my beagle tells me there (5+ / 0-)

              are psycho-killer rabbits out there that he has to warn us about (loudly, very loudly). Maybe we should just give beagles to everyone who wants an assault weapon. The noise factor would be about the same. But no little kid is going to find a beagle and shoot his friend with it.

              You fell victim to one of the classic blunders, the most famous of which is "Never get involved in a land war in Asia".

              by yellowdog on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:38:44 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  My bassets agree (0+ / 0-)

                Though your moniker is yellowdog, so I'm thinking you don't have a beagle either.  Thank Dog I'm a liberal Dem.

                •  Sorry - typing too fast (0+ / 0-)

                  My basset nudged me when I should have read that you DO have a beagle.  My apologies.  Heck, you may even have a Yellow Lab to boot.  Sorry for being stupid.

                  •  A yellow dog democrat (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    Heyroot

                    is a party loyalist:

                    The term, Yellow Dog Democrat, blossomed during all of the Hoopla which surrounded the 1928 elections, when Al Smith ran for President against Herbert Hoover. During that  campaign, Senator Tom Heflin, of Alabama, declined to back his fellow Democrat, Al Smith the Governor of NY. In fact it was much worse than that, Senator Heflin decided to back Herbert Hoover, who would then go on to become President- a Republican President no less. Heflin's controversial actions were considered heresy, especially in the South. As you can imagine, quite a large number of Alabamans vehemently disagreed with Senator Heflin's decision to cross his "Party Lines". Hence, the popular saying, "I'd vote for a yellow dog if he ran on the Democratic ticket" was born! It was adopted as the proud slogan of the staunch party loyalist.
                    At the time, this phrase certainly did not reflect well on Senator Heflin.

                    Yellow Dog Democrat

                    You fell victim to one of the classic blunders, the most famous of which is "Never get involved in a land war in Asia".

                    by yellowdog on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:07:39 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

            •  I miss my Kalashnikov (0+ / 0-)

               I used to own a AK-47 - nice piece of machinery - stone simple, will fire with sand pouring through the action, and ammunition is cheap.

               The next piece will be an AR-15 shorty - ammo and magazine compatible with what our federal troops carry and easier on my battered body than the 7.62x39 Russian.

              "Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise" - U.S. Constitution author and fourth President James Madison

              by Iowa Boy on Sun Aug 27, 2006 at 10:27:12 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  use the media definition, silly! (8+ / 0-)

         You're very right, bink, but we're dealing with a neocon/corporate dominated media that have sold a bill of goods to the unthinking masses - 'liberal' means two gay men making a sandwich with a closeted married guy, writing checks to Planned Parenthood, then trying to sort out their Birkenstocks before they go out for their weekly tree hugging session.

         I get that Bill O'Reilly "you're a liberal" sneer out of some people ... most recently my new girlfriend's eleven year old. She doesn't mean to sneer, mind you, its just how people say that word these days. We proceeded to have a long talk over dinner last night about the constitution, criminality, impeachment, and the like. I was talking to her, but conservative Catholic mommy was listening very closely ... and thusly does the Republican party's propaganda get seperated from its true behavior :-)

        "Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise" - U.S. Constitution author and fourth President James Madison

        by Iowa Boy on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:25:07 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Sigh (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          wishingwell, DSPS owl

          Iowa Boy thanks. It means a lot to be able to carry on a rational discussion with a self labeled conservative. This gives me hope for my poor belegered country!

          IF YOUR NOT OUTRAGED YOUR NOT PAYING ATTENTION!

          by FrankieB on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:03:48 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  maybe conservative isn't the right word (0+ / 0-)

             I am ...

             A foreign policy hawk. I'd be laughing at GWB if the stakes weren't so high, for he lacks only long floppy shoes and a big multicolored wig in this area.

             A fiscal conservative. Don't spend it before you've earned it unless its a well understood investment.

             A constitutionalist. Is that even a word? The least of our founding fathers would have taken our current administration to task with one brain lobe tied behind their spinal cord.

              I might very well go back to voting Republican, but only if the party rediscovers its roots; rule of the law, smaller government, less nanny state more personal responsibility, etc, etc. The current mix of robber barrons and religious fanatics they manipulate to remain in power inspires me, but that inspiration involves clicking the little 'donate' button for netroots candidates.

            "Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise" - U.S. Constitution author and fourth President James Madison

            by Iowa Boy on Sun Aug 27, 2006 at 10:43:52 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  WTF? (0+ / 0-)

      Thusly I have much different conversations than those of you who are so liberal as to scorch plant life on your way to hug a tree

      Maybe I haven't had enough coffee yet, so can you explain exactly what that means?

      •  it means Daily Kos is a bigger tent (4+ / 0-)

        than the DLC acknopwledges. Get thicker skin.  ;-)

        "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

        by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:18:06 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  yeah (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        drbloodaxe

        I took it as a joke. Actually I had a real problem earlier today when I saw a tree I wanted to hug but to do so I would have had to step on a homosexual couple who were making out in the grass. Quite a dilemma.

        "Quidquid dicendum est, libere dicam." -Cicero

        by BennyAbelard on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:51:04 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  What it means (0+ / 0-)

         What it means, Mike, is that the flaming liberal journalist I dated a few years back, who believes every word on CommonDreams.org is the gospel truth despite being an aetheist, has a very different experience than I do when talking to a rancher from Western Nebraska.

         You get into a discussion with a guy with a toboggan sized belt buckle and a highly accessorized truck and you'll find certain attitudes. Ms. Liberal will get dismissed in short order, while I can draw them out, end with "and while homosexuality appears to be genetic rather than a moral choice, the obsessive compulsive behavior seen in some religious fanatics is a treatable disorder", and I get them thinking rather than dismissively snorting.

        "Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise" - U.S. Constitution author and fourth President James Madison

        by Iowa Boy on Sun Aug 27, 2006 at 11:03:02 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Re: The gun nut types (3+ / 0-)

      The only ones who aren't planning on pressing real hard on  all the little blue levers are the real gun nut types. The recall each and every vote against the second ammendment and they're not going to let it go. Democrats here in rural areas get some guilt by association here and I don't have a good prescription for how to fix it.

      Our local and very rural Democrat Club and Central Committee is raffling off a Shotgun at one of our local Dem headquarter events. That's one PR idea to deal with the guilt by association problem.

      The only hazard I seen with this will be when all the gun nut heads explode.

      •  That's a great idea! (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        drbloodaxe

        I live in the middle of gun country.  Every household has 8 or 18 shotguns and rifles.  Gun control has been used to beat Dems over the head in this area for 25 years.  The Brady Bill is still a platform item!!

        I really like the idea of raffeling a shotgun to demonstrate that rural Dems, "get it".  We still have folks around here who fish and hunt for subsistence, particularily since NAFTA and CAFTA policies closed the mills.

    •  That's what I've been doing ... (0+ / 0-)

      ...in my blog. Being a (Democratic/libertarian) conservative myself, does make it a little easier.

      I pound on this one message, which goes straight to the conservative heart.

      Big Spending, Big Deficit, Big Government Republicans

      "The maxim of civil government being reversed in that of religion, where it's true form is, 'divided we stand, united we fall." - Thomas Jefferson

      by DWSUWF on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 11:01:25 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I like that slogan (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DWSUWF

        It says it all..!!!

        I have started to say recently....

        Democrats are for freedom, liberty and privacy.

        and when people ask about the privacy, I say,
        " Republicans want to stick their nose in your private life and your personal decisions".

        Carry the battle to them. Don't let them bring it to you. Put them on the defensive and don't ever apologize for anything. - Harry S. Truman

        by wishingwell on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:10:55 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  The only ones who (0+ / 0-)

      aren't planning on pressing real hard on  all the little blue levers are the real gun nut types.

      There are plenty of elites who wouldn't bat an eyelash if George was caught fucking a goat on the white house lawn. Big oil is laughing all the way to the bank. What are Democrats going to do about gas prices? Will they bring our boys home? We should be asking the hard questions instead of giving them a free pass.

      "When all else fails try following directions"

      by SoldiersInRevolt on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:14:45 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I agree (0+ / 0-)

        It is more than the single issue Gun voters, it is also the Oil Company Executives, Big Business and also the far right religious sector...( the anti abortion, anti gay ) single issue voters too.

        Carry the battle to them. Don't let them bring it to you. Put them on the defensive and don't ever apologize for anything. - Harry S. Truman

        by wishingwell on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:22:55 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  How bout this (0+ / 0-)

      you can keep your guns, as long as congress doesn't give the gun industry anymore big wet kisses in the form of immunity from liability. I just want to know that someone will be able to sue Glock et alia when you get injured in a hunting accident, or I get killed cause someone broke into your house, stole your guns and shiped them to Chicago.

      "Quidquid dicendum est, libere dicam." -Cicero

      by BennyAbelard on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:59:22 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  This all sounds wonderful... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      drbloodaxe

      I think it's great that we have "conservative Dems" in our party.  I don't think being a Democrat means you have to get a 17 out of 20 on a litmus test.  I think most people have complex ideologies that don't fit a particular label.  

      For instance my "liberal beliefs" are economic populism (min. wage, unions, etc), equal rights for all (including gay marriage), environmental conservation/protection, and national healthcare, to just name a few.  

      I also have a few "conservative beliefs" (Goldwater conservatism, not Bush conservatism).  These include balanced budgets and keeping the government out of personal lives.  

      But on three of the big social issues, I'm a moderate.  
      Guns-every person should be allowed to have a gun next to their bed at home and under the counter of their business. However, I think you should have to have a license to own a gun, which includes background checks and gun-safety courses, and restrictions to try and prevent guns from getting on the streets.  
      Abortion-it should be legal, covered by insurance, and there should be a minimum of 3 abortion clinics in each state.  However, I think 3rd trimester and partial-birth abortions should be illegal.  
      Church and State-all Govt legislation should be based solely on the Constitution, school prayer kept illegal, and Intelligent Design not taught in schools.  However, I have no problem with a single student bringing the Bible to public school and reading it to himself, Manger scenes during Christmastime, or Ten Commandments displays in front of courthouses (as long as it is placed there as a historical/judicial document, as in the SC Court case Van Orden v. Perry.)  Church/State is a slippery slope, so there are numerous important issues to deal with, but I think some of these issues could be resolved if people just lighten up and stop acting like they are so offended when a high school valedictorian quotes scripture in his/her graduation speech, or when somebody doesn't say "Under God" when reciting the Pledge of Allegiance.

      In the end, I think more Americans have very mixed beliefs such as I do than they are totally to the extreme to one side or the other.  

      The Dems have great VP candidates for 2008: Richardson, Bayh, Clark, Sebelius, etc, but who's going to head the ticket?

      by DemBrock on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 03:10:34 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Also, don't confuse... (0+ / 0-)

      wanting to preserve the environment with "hippy tree-huggers."  1 in 7 Americans belong to an environmental group, so it's not all left-wing Dems trying to preserve it.  

      The Dems have great VP candidates for 2008: Richardson, Bayh, Clark, Sebelius, etc, but who's going to head the ticket?

      by DemBrock on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 03:25:50 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  "where' s Osama" scares me (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    teacherken, Granny Doc

    as a politcal point. If it became a rallying cry, and then they catch him the week before the election (or take him out of whatever place they are holding him) it could backfire.

    Mythology is what we call other people's religion-Joseph Campbell

    by Sherri in TX on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:12:18 AM PDT

    •  Osama must be exhumed, not caught (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DSPS owl

       Everything I'm seeing indicates the guy has been dead about four years. He is a fragile fifty something, needs (needed!) regular dialysis, and is likely buried somewhere in Tora Bora. Show me a video of him commenting directly on current issues and I'll reconsider this position ...

      "Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise" - U.S. Constitution author and fourth President James Madison

      by Iowa Boy on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:28:11 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  As comedien Brad Garrett said.... (0+ / 0-)

        George Bush! Hell, He can't find a 6 foot tall Man living in a Cave dragging around a dialysis machine with a camera man following him.

        Carry the battle to them. Don't let them bring it to you. Put them on the defensive and don't ever apologize for anything. - Harry S. Truman

        by wishingwell on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:20:46 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  That is exactly what I was thinking (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DSPS owl, Granny Doc, ColoTim

      Not worth giving an opening to have them trot out osama right before the election. It should be part of the dems arsenal, but not the prime focus. This administration has so much shit flying around at any given time, perhaps the dems should run as the "Bullshit Detector" party. They could have a big meter that shoots up/spins in response to every rightwing talking point out there.

      "Sadaam had weapons of mass destruction"-- off the charts!
      "No one could have anticipated the breech of the levees" --Ding! Ding! Ding!
      "People who believe warrantless wiretapping is unconstitutional just don't understand the world we're living in"--Dial spins out of control and flies off the gauge.

    •  i don't agree (0+ / 0-)

      i don't agree.  i think it's the point of showing that cheney and bush went on a very expensive and terrorist fanning tangent rather than staying the course and get terrorists.

      so even if they do catch him, it's a day late and a dollar short

    •  Sometimes I think this as well (0+ / 0-)

      Then I remember this administration is incompetent. They would bungle boiling water and they would get lost going to the bathroom.

      Carry the battle to them. Don't let them bring it to you. Put them on the defensive and don't ever apologize for anything. - Harry S. Truman

      by wishingwell on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:13:54 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  As more Republicans peel away (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Granny Doc, Iowa Boy, jayb

    there may be an opportunity to hold their feet to the fire by having John Murtha bring forth a resolution to announce withdrawal from Iraq. The potential value of such a move is that the Republican leadership would probably seize on it, and then suffer a defeat as (to their dismay) a lot of the more thretaened members peeled away and voted with the Democrats.

    Walking. It's the new driving.

    by Batfish on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:14:56 AM PDT

  •  What I don't understand... (6+ / 0-)

    How can 49 percent of the population APPROVE of Bush's handling of terrorism and homeland security? I know it's a drop, but I find it amazing that so many people think making passengers run around airports in their socks looking for a water fountain contributes to our security.

    What is morally wrong can never be advantageous, even when it enables you to make some gain...Cicero

    by carolita on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:17:07 AM PDT

    •  the public aproves of no further Al Queda events (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Granny Doc

      on US soil. The public does not fully understand why, but doesn't really care why as long as it remains so.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:19:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Of course (0+ / 0-)

        the real reason there haven't been any more is that al Quaeda shot their wad in being able to round up 19 (mostly Saudis) guys willing to commit suicide and arming them with box cutters.

        They've never had any kind of reasonable chance to do anything more damaging to the US mainland than steal a few planes to crash.

        So how does torturing Iraqis and wiretapping my phonecalls without a warrant make me safer again?
        I keep forgetting the logic on that.

        Got a problem with my posts? Email me, and let's resolve it.

        by drbloodaxe on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 06:14:00 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Some people want to believe (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      carolita

      so desparately that Bush is keeping them safe... otherwise they wouldnt let their children out of the house each morning....

      "Order without liberty and liberty without order are equally destructive." - Theodore Roosevelt

      by Voxbear on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:48:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  no attacks on U.S. soil (0+ / 0-)

      trouble is, that if there is another attack on U.S. soil, Bush's numbers will spike UP, before they plummet.

      He'd hold a 10-15 point spike for about a month.  Then he'd land at about 26%.


      Ignorance is, if not bliss, then at least widespread - Josh Marshall

      by AlyoshaKaramazov on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 11:39:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Gallup pretty much an inhouse polling corp. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jj32, Easterling, Granny Doc

    Can't trust them at all.

  •  The General (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    majcmb1, kck

    nails it - Heartbreaking and wall-punching anger inducing simultaneously.

    More people are driven insane through religious hysteria than by drinking alcohol.

    by calipygian on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:19:47 AM PDT

  •  Republicans = Bush (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    hoplite9, GodRifle, Granny Doc, John Boy

    If you're a Republican the leaders of your party are Bush and Cheney. Period. Republicans almost unanamously in 2004 supported this incompetent moron for reelection. Bush and Cheney continue to raise great sums of money for Republicans across the country. Democrats need to link Republicans candidates to the leaders of their party: Bush and Cheney. I'm not only talking about the right wing nuts, I include the so called moderates as well. They're party of the problem on Iraq and a whole host of other issues.

  •  What if Democrats get into power? I'll tell ya: (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    majcmb1, Voxbear, DSPS owl, FrankieB, Iowa Boy

    We will have leaders who respect the constitution and follow the laws of our land.

    We will have sound policies that will be skillfully executed.

    We will see officials held accountable for their actions and performance.

    The 9/11 Commission recommendations will be implemented rather than ignored.

    We will see Congress convene for more days, in stark contrast to the current Congress (which has had more vacation than in any other year).

    We will see that government spending is carefully controlled and that the public's money is spent wisely.

    Our leaders will not change Senate rules or create laws in order to shelter their unethical colleagues.

    We'll see that those who testify before Congress will always be sworn in.

    There won't be a monopoly on power in Washington.

    In short, we'll have a better America.

    I remember a time when the American President was the leader of the free world. ****** Repeat after me: "Neoconservatism has failed America."

    by land of the free on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:26:45 AM PDT

  •  'Just This Once' Campaign-- (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    hoplite9, gbussey, Granny Doc

    There's only one legal way that's practical to change course in the American system: vote-in the opposition party.

    You don't need to convert, you can go back to voting Republican the minute they become a sensible political party once again.

    Of course, we hope you'll like what your country gets from Democrats, and stay with us.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy....--ML King, "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:30:40 AM PDT

  •  On Katrina, more trouble brewing. (6+ / 0-)

    20/20 tonight, will profile 2 sisters employed by State Farm, who claim that the company shredded documents, threatened nonpayment for engineering reports if the conclusions were not altered to benefit the company and hid reports that concluded wind damage.

    The sisters,

    Kerri and Cori Rigsby, independent adjusters who had worked for State Farm exclusively for eight years, say they have turned over thousands of internal company documents and their own detailed statement to the FBI and Mississippi state investigators.

    Good for them.

    I drew a circle. It was blue. And it turned into a circle of gold.

    by goodasgold on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:30:53 AM PDT

  •  What happens if the Dems control? (0+ / 0-)

    Ha Ha! What happens if Bushtards stay the course?

    My president is a small, petty man.

    by jeau bleau on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:32:40 AM PDT

  •  Why... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Granny Doc

    have we known all this for YEARS and it is just now that some are waking up???  Grrrrr.......  (just needed to vent) Thanks!

    •  The Greatest Propaganda Machine of Modern History (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      drbloodaxe

      Starting in earnest in public with the Reagan election machine in 1980 and constantly expanding, never abating.

      While we're still technically a free country on an individual basis, statistically it's impossible for the average reasonable citizen to have much clue about current events.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy....--ML King, "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:36:39 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  turn off the T.V. (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Easterling, DSPS owl, Zippity, drbloodaxe

         Turn off the T.V. Subscribe to Foreign Affairs. Subscribe to The Economist. Pick up Foreign Policy when you're at the bookstore. And use this marvel we call the internet ...

         Its real easy to find out what is happening ... but you can't be a lazy ass vegetable in front of the T.V. and wait for it to be spoon fed to you in entertaining, prechewed bites.

        "Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise" - U.S. Constitution author and fourth President James Madison

        by Iowa Boy on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:39:26 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  So many people aren't informed. (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Terri, BennyAbelard, hoplite9, Iowa Boy

          I work with a couple wingnuts that are always coming out of their offices to talk at a group of older women I work with, spewing all the Karl Rove talking points. I try to ignore them, then go over and rebut everything they said with facts. These women seem very easily influenced. The latest discussion had to do with the ruling on the NSA program. They all believed Bush's version of "If al Queda is calling, we want to know why." I said that I did too, but I wanted there to be oversight, and for them to do it within the law. Then I brought up the fact that the FISA court had only denied 5 or 6 warrants in the 30 years since it passed, and that they could listen for up to 3 days before getting a warrant. None of them knew that.

          Sometimes I think it would be easier, and less stressful, to go back to being politically unaware.

          Benjamin Franklin said "The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results." Sounds like Bush's Iraq Policy.

          by Zippity on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:15:08 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Yes But DON'T TIE IT to BUSH! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Terri, Iowa Boy

    I recognize the need not to insult Republicans but this must be tied inextricably to the Republican party of the present.

    Party party party party party. The Party runs everything, the party is botching everything.

    I'll leave it to other nuancers to figure out exactly how to word it, but we must convince that the blame is the party and not Bush.

    Otherwise the usual trend of supporting the local Republican will still prevail.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy....--ML King, "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:34:51 AM PDT

  •  Google "failure"... (0+ / 0-)

    and see what comes up as the first entry. Maybe some search engine tweaker has a timely sense of humor?

    •  not sure (0+ / 0-)

      I sent that to my husband and he said that he knew about that for at least two years. Keeping in mind that there is no way to prove or disprove ANY theory on this subject my geeky man thinks it could be possibly #1 because of the number of times that a site is accessed or #2 the number of times an article on George Bush has the word failure attached to him in articles, and that if it was just a tweaker some one in the GOP would have complained and made Google change it.  Whatever way it has occured it really is an appropriate result.

      IF YOUR NOT OUTRAGED YOUR NOT PAYING ATTENTION!

      by FrankieB on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:16:28 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  simply a google bomb.... (0+ / 0-)

      You can turn the President, who is a failure, and has presided over policy failure after failure, into a failure on google by linking the White House website to the word failure via a link everytime you type the word failure....

      If you really want to help, you can use the word failure in your sig and it will be picked every time you talk about this failure of a presidency...

      Have fun...

      First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you...then you win -- Mahatma Gandhi

      by justmy2 on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 03:48:15 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  i thought moderates were stupid (0+ / 0-)
    and spineless.
    •  we're all moderates here. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Terri, FrankieB, drbloodaxe
      it's them in DC that are radicals... and rascals.

      It's about time "moderate" got put into proper perspective. I dislike centrist, but i could learn to tolerate it as well.

      There is an angry left. But it's a conservative myth that that's what we all are.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:49:37 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Even though R's control major communications (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Doc Allen, majcmb1, Iowa Boy, drbloodaxe

    I point it out again and again, this is all happening while the major media outlets, print and electronic, are under Republican control. Our isolated little "voices by keyboard" and a few who dare tell the truth, like Olberman, are the "network" that may help save America.

    Imagine what's going to happen when the D's are unleashed to investigate all the abuses we've seen--and those we haven't. Someone is going to jail--LOTS of someones. 2007 will be the year of investigation, the year of finding the TRUTH.  Bush by the end of 2007 will have the "approval rating" of moquito bites.

    Look for the impeachment resolution in early 2008.

    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? (Who will watch the watchers?)

    by The Crusty Bunker on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:39:19 AM PDT

    •  you can't impeach a failed ideology (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Doc Allen, The Crusty Bunker

       We suspect the midterm is ours and once we're sure we need to focus on the neocon ideology itself, as that is the true source of our pain. Had George Bush not been elected we'd have had some other tool filling the highest office in the land ...

      "Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise" - U.S. Constitution author and fourth President James Madison

      by Iowa Boy on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:41:50 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  feet to the fire folks. . . (9+ / 0-)

    this failed administration was the most honest expression to date of the core philosophy of today's conservative movement and the modern republican party.

    let me say that again, because it matters.

    this failed administration was the most honest expression to date of the core philosophy of today's conservative movement and the modern republican party.

    no ducking and dodging folks. incompetence is not the problem, hell no. a governing philosophy with such contempt of the public realm, that embraces economic hero-worship and elitism, that despises the poor and the disenfranchised, that believes in quick resort to the force of arms is the problem. ideas matter, and this radical modern republicanism is full of deadly ones. they told us they were going to do this!

    remember this, folks. this is what they really wanted. the problem isn't the administration, but the immoral, irrational, and irresponsible ideology itself.

    a failed presidency, a failed party, a movement that needs to move on. and so do we.

  •  Democrats' Ads: History 101 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Granny Doc, Iowa Boy

    Republicans will now start echoing the Democrats' demands of the past 6 Bush years: Iraq timetable, accountability for FEMA and DHS, Bush is incompetent and dangerous. Their corporate media access will let Republicans act like they invented all those positions. Democrats will get branded "me too", as mediamnesia lets Republicans take credit for "leadership" they finally reached in desperation after letting Democrats take the risks and prepare the ground.

    Unless Democrats go all out on PR. While Americans are watching campaign ads this Fall, Democrats have the chance to just buy media time to promote themselves without "balance" from Republicans. A united Democratic Party message will leverage their momentum and show their party has been sane for years while the Republicans and the country went nuts around them. Republicans will air their own ads claiming the opposite, or something even more devious, but Democrats have momentum on their side.

    If Democrats don't run their recent history against the Republicans this Fall, it will be wasted on those few who can remember it.

    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

    by DocGonzo on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:41:26 AM PDT

  •  Democrats are NOT Off the Hook (3+ / 0-)

    please, democrats in congress are almost as much to blame for the federal government's piss poor response and reconstruction efforts in the Gulf Coast/NOLA as the stupid and insensitive republicans are.

    congressional democrats continue to insanely sign appropriations bills for billions of dollars for Iraq while NOLA stands there with their hand out- waiting for money to be appropriated.

    WEAK, very weak.

    anyone who thinks residents of the Gulf Coast and NOLA are strictly blaming republicans for the mess and lack of response is naive.

    "Peace is not the absence of war; it is a virtue; a state of mind; a disposition for benevolence; confidence; and justice." Spinoza

    by Superpole on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:46:56 AM PDT

    •  but the average voter (0+ / 0-)

      but the average voter won't understand the details nor want to be bothered by them.

      so blaming katrina on the republicons works

      not to mention that the bush administration is responsible for most of the lack of response obviously

    •  INCOMING!! (0+ / 0-)

      'In the short term, we have to work with the Democrats we have,' Kos answered. 'If it’s Hillary Clinton, fine. I don’t think she’s as unelectable as some people think'

      Who'da thought grown adults could be so easily entertained?

      by Shit meet fan on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 11:39:10 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  George & Co. have no chance in November (0+ / 0-)

      I just hope the Democrats  will lead on electoral reform when they take over.

      Full representation would improve racial and ethnic diversity. At least ten additional people of color would likely be elected to the House (particularly in the South) Think about it...full representation would also elect more women. The DKos babes should be all over this!

      If the Democrats focus on a diversity of views in our legislatures it will not only help their party, but the rest of the nation as well.

      "When all else fails try following directions"

      by SoldiersInRevolt on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:01:20 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  No, we're the failure (0+ / 0-)
  •  I'm still concerned because... (0+ / 0-)

    ...to oversimplify, if 50% of polled Americans don't vote, but (most of) the 30% Bush fanatics do vote, they still beat us 30-to-20, which is how they've won before.

    Also I don't find the fact that 48% of DEMOCRATS in a blue state like CT could still vote for Lieberman reassuring. I don't think he stands a chance now, but the mindset seems to show we're still quite far from an end to the denial.

    Show me Bush at 25% then I'll cheer.

    OVER HERE: AN AMERICAN EXPAT IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE, is now available on Amazon US

    by Lupin on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:50:57 AM PDT

    •  that is an oversimplification (0+ / 0-)

      but to addrwess your point, "Bush is a miserable failure... Iraq, Katrina and Osama prove it" is the best way to address the low-informed marginal voter.

      if 50% of polled Americans don't vote, but (most of) the 30% Bush fanatics do vote, they still beat us 30-to-20, which is how they've won before.

      No they don't... where did you see them winning by 10%.. FL? OH? Learn the lessons of the previous elections and see how dollars don't overwhelm Dems as in previous years, and how intensity (via polling) repeatedly and significantly favors Dems, with Rs being discouraged this year. Work on the ground still has to be done, but the prtents and signs are that this is not 2002 or 2004.

      As far as CT goes, incumbents are IMPOSSIBLE to beat... it's called the Land Of Steady Habits for a reason. Joe had a 60 point lead. And yet...

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:05:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The Lamont win was a spectacular victory (0+ / 0-)

        against an entrenched incumbent.  Swan has to be given an enormous amount of credit, and Ned Lamont came across as trustworthy, decent, and sincere.  Lieberman's image seems to be the opposite and getting worse.  He's getting to be known as a "sore loser."  Let's hope the campaign continues along this path, and let's get Ned's face on the news and in the papers.  One of my friends told me that it was the first time in a long, long time that he was voting for a person he really liked.  Ned has to continue to be his own man and a man "of the people."  IMO, that will do it.  People are really tired of the old politics of failure and slime.

      •  I would add to this (0+ / 0-)

        Don't expect that 30% to all show up at the polls. Yes, in the past "x" number of elections, right-wing voters who overwhelmingly backed Bush and the neo-cons showed up in large numbers. Even still, these were not watershed elections in terms of huge majorities. In fact, things were very close despite the guffaws of the MSM and the claim of a "mandate" by Bush. (And that's not even counting the issue of stolen votes in various areas of the country, Ohio most notably.)

        Having said that, there is a lot of disillusionment over what the neo-cons have done on everything from running up the the greatest debts in US history while the economy continues to weaken, all-time high gas prices, Iraq, failure to get Osama bin Laden, etc. Not all conservative voters like what they've seen. Will they flock to the Dems? Not likely. A few will, but many will sit on their hands and show their ultimate displeasure by not voting in the off-year election.

        Mind you, these folks are stubborn and would rather cut off their nose to spite their face than to go along with identified failure and be described as utter fools.

        Nose, prepare to be separated from the face -- which is the neo-cons aka the Republican Party.

        "Fool me once, shame on -- shame on you. Fool me -- you can't get fooled again." --George W. Bush

        by RevJoe on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 01:35:29 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  As Republicans (0+ / 0-)

    "try and shift the conversation to the future: what if Democrats get into power?"  We should continue to force the conversation on the question: what if Republicans stay in power?  How much worse can they make it?

  •  do NOT rebuild New Orleans (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Doc Allen, Granny Doc

     We're pissing away money on a war in Iraq and not rebuilding New Orleans. I'm not pleased about Iraq, but I'd be less pleased about money pouring into the gulf coast region. What part of "global warming" isn't clear?

     The last twenty four months have show us the second hurricane to ever hit Brazil, the very first to make landfall in Spain, and two hundred year storms back to back in the Gulf of Mexico. This situation isn't going to get any better. We may be seeing a Katrina/Camille sized event every year or two and this will surely scour the gulf coast clean of much of its human activity. We need to accept that those theorized environmental refugees aren't going to first appear on that theoretical South Pacific island; they're here, they're now, and we're very likely to get another large crop of them by this time next week.

    "Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise" - U.S. Constitution author and fourth President James Madison

    by Iowa Boy on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:55:33 AM PDT

    •  rebuild or not, the current policy of "cross your (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DSPS owl

      fingers, hope they do okay" is a failure. Should another hurricane hit this year, their deliberate policy of folding FEMA into DHS, thereby destryoing its effectiveness, is what we are discussing.

      "Don't build where it floods" would be superior policy anywhere anytime. But NOLA is not a simple matter.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 09:59:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  DHS: fold, spindle, mutilate (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DemFromCT

         I'm looking forward to a Democrat dominated congress that will fold, spindle and mutilate DHS. We needed better coordination between various law enforcement efforts, not a big fat government agency sitting atop them with no attendant cost reductions.

        "Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise" - U.S. Constitution author and fourth President James Madison

        by Iowa Boy on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:01:14 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  house boats not trailers (0+ / 0-)

      house boats (with anchor chains) not trailers

  •  Worst. Suggestion. Ever. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mogolori, nailbender, DSPS owl

    Mann also cautioned Democrats to not let the GOP somehow turn the election into a prospective, future-oriented question, but to make it as much a retrospective assessment of Bush in the Republicans.

    So, the American people are fed up with the Republicans. They know Iraq is a quagmire. They know Katrina was a massive failure. They know the economy--at least for those who make less than a gazillion dollars--sucks. And on and on and on, ad nauseum. Hello? That's why the polls show the Democrats poised to retake the majority in Congress!

    The question the American people are asking of the Democrats is: "What will you do to create a better future for this country?" They want to hear about our vision of te future. They want to know why the Democrats are worth voting for, not just why they should stay home and not vote for the Republicans. And the advice is to focus on the past? Good way to lose the election.

    If people can't vote their hopes, they will vote their fears. If they vote their fears, we all know what that will mean.

    I've only had one cup of coffee so take this comment in that spirit, please :)

    You can make it if you focus on connections, not on differences.
    -7.00, -6.77

    by sunflight on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:01:43 AM PDT

    •  but as Chris Matthews is fonbd of saying (0+ / 0-)

      "Amuricans vote against."  ;-)

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:07:01 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  consider the source LOL (0+ / 0-)

        Maybe he's right. But that doesn't mean Amuricans don't vote for when there's something to vote for. It just means there usually isn't.

        I think that counting on a vote against would be a dangerous gamble this year. We need to give people a reason to go to the polls.

        You can make it if you focus on connections, not on differences.
        -7.00, -6.77

        by sunflight on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:22:43 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Bush and the Republicans.... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sunflight

      have defined any action other then "stay the course" as a failure.

      Any alternative we propose has to be presented as as a positve like

      "Hope for Iraq"
      then our Ideas

      And when republicans attack those policies then we say "you not for Hope in Iraq? What type of message does that sent?"

      Thats what they do to us all the time.

      can we impeach him now? how about now? what about now? I hated george bush before it was cool.

      by dehrha02 on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:16:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I question that advice too, but (0+ / 0-)

      the fact is it's an anti-bush year, and if I were Democrats I would spend at least half my energy, and maybe more, on demonizing the preisdent policy's, demonizing Republicans (corruption and do-nothing congress), and most critically connecting Republican to Bush. Attacking them is taking offense, which we did not near enough in recent elections. Work from their failed policie to what we'd do better. Make sure people know of all the failures of Bush and Republicans, and say the only way we can have a change is a power change in congress. Ideas are important too, but they're secondary to telling the American people how the GOP is destroying this country.

      •  victims (0+ / 0-)
        They already know Bush is destroying the country. That's what the polls show. Confirm that for them, sure, but focus on being "anti" and we put ourselves in the role of victim. Victims are by definition powerless, and people don't trust them to be in power--especially when it comes to national security.

        You can make it if you focus on connections, not on differences.
        -7.00, -6.77

        by sunflight on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:54:42 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Like all good Rethuglicans - those staffers... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    hoplite9

    ...know how to cut and run

    "now this is not the end, it is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning." W. Churchill

    by Thor Heyerdahl on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:05:38 AM PDT

  •  Oh, stop it, you are insulting failures (0+ / 0-)

    by comparing them to BushRoveCheneyCo.

    Play the man, Master Ridley; we shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out

    by Cartoon Peril on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:06:24 AM PDT

  •  Excellent Diary! (0+ / 0-)

    The hunt for Osama Bin Ladin; Failure
    The Iraq War; Failure
    Katrina; Domestic policy disaster
    Israel/ lebanon: Foreign Policy disaster
    War on terror; Failure
     

    Another good question to ask might be;

    What exactly has been a success for George Bush and the republican party?

  •  no center among the centrists (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Heart of the Rockies
    The whole idea that any individual voter is a "centrist" is absurd, beyond unreal.  If you think about it for second or two, no one sees him or herself as somewhere in the center on any significant number of issues. So any candidate trying to move toward "the center" is aiming for some target that does not exist.  Too zen for me.
          On the other hand, taking a conserving position (we're talking the verb, "to conserve"  not the adj. "conservative") on 30 or 40 issues -- conserving Nature, conserving jobs in the USA, conserving energy, conserving what  little is left of our good reputation abroad,  conserving rule of law at home and abroad, etc. etc.  --  is a way for every one of the 435 Democratic Party candidates for the House to appeal to many independents and a precious few disgruntled, uneasy, disappointed Republicans whose votes count twice when they don't vote Republican but do vote Democratic in November.    

    Charlie 'Pathminded' Keil I also blog over at Conserving Consensus.

    by Pathminded on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:20:36 AM PDT

    •  Depress the republican vote (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      loudGizmo

      We should be quietly pointing out to all republican strongholds that the Washington Republicans,  hannity, rush et al are endorsing a pro-choice, pro-gay rights senator from the NorthEast.

      choke them with their own red meat.

      can we impeach him now? how about now? what about now? I hated george bush before it was cool.

      by dehrha02 on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:25:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Oh, God (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BennyAbelard

    I hope it's true that the Dems are gaining momentum.  I'm running for the county commission, which is currently controlled by the Repugs, who, believe it or not, are more stupid about parroting the Repug talking points than those on the national level.  It may explain why my opponent, as well as the opponent of a colleague of mine, haven't raised or spent any money on their campaign so far.

    "Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves." - William Pitt

    by blueinnc on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 10:35:54 AM PDT

  •  Get ready... (0+ / 0-)

    If those moonie-cons.(cons. that take everything you have and brainwash you) start saying a cheny (if dems get in we will get hit again) .. Tell them Who was in charge and had 52 warnings about 9/11 and who was in charge when katrina hit and did nothing..

  •  Definition of "Outlier" (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Heart of the Rockies
    The Gallup Poll can't be said to be an outlier based on all the evidence.

    If Bush's approval is at or near 38% then the Gallup Poll, if it has a MOE of 3.2 or more, could be just at the high end of the MOE, and would therefore not be an outlier in the strict sense of the word.

    Remember most polls round to the nearest whole percent.

    •  please click the link and read it. n/t (0+ / 0-)

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:09:15 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The article misuses "outliers" too (0+ / 0-)
        Maybe technically the Gallup poll was out of the MOE from his current level of 37.4%, but that average reflects all the polls that have come since. At the time he had his average at 38%, so the Gallup Poll wasn't necessarily an outlier depending on what it was rounded from.

        Typically, outlier has been used to describe the roughly 1/20 of polls that, even conducted properly, will fall outside the MOE. This author seems to use them simply to describe the highest and lowest levels attained during a specific time.

        •  no, there's a good deal more mathematical rigor (0+ / 0-)

          than that. Gallup and CNN, as well as the 33% AP poll, are true outliers.

          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

          by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 01:18:05 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  NOLA was Bush Homeland Security's first test.... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BennyAbelard

    And, don't forget, Bush's justice department still hasn't caught the Anthrax terrorist.

  •  It's coming. Ride the wave. n/t (0+ / 0-)

    "Fool me once, shame on -- shame on you. Fool me -- you can't get fooled again." --George W. Bush

    by RevJoe on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 11:15:37 AM PDT

  •  Not a failure (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    hoplite9, dehrha02, Monique Radevu

    The Bush administration may be a disaster, but it is not a failure.  They have done what they set out to do.  The fact that this nation and so much of the world has been so heavily damaged in the course of that does not mean they have not succeeded in their aims.  

    This is all about dismantling the New Deal.  More than that, it is about making that level of vision and commitment impossible to achieve ever again.  Don't take my word for it:  Twenty years ago David Stockman said out loud that the deficit was being driven up as a calculated strategy for cutting back spending on social programs. Partly that's a political calculation:  These programs are supported by most Americans.  If you cut them as a matter of choice, you'll lose elections.  If you make it a matter of necessity, well, then maybe you've got a shot.

    But there's more to it than that.  FDR financed the welfare state by raising the deficit.  They wanted to make sure the next FDR - should we be fortunate enough to still produce one -- would not have that option no matter how strong the will.  That means bankrupting the Treasury.*

    Every dollar that gets sucked out of the treasury is a dollar that can no longer be wasted on evil programs that make Baby Jesus cry.  Examples of such programs would be Head Start, Medicare, Social Security -- you know the list.  So if we're bogged down in two or three wars around the world -- hey, that's a great way to siphon off money.  And if some of it gets siphoned into the coffers of, say, Haliburton, so much the better.

    Why did we go to war with Iraq?  Easy -- so we could go to war with Iraq.  They wanted a war -- they got a war.  That's success.  Doesn't matter how many Americans and Iraqis die as a result.  None of the dead are Pioneers or Rangers -- so fuck 'em.  

    Bad for us, sure.  But we're not on their radar.   We're bugs on the windshield, baby.  Splat, splat, splat.  Where do you wanna stop for dinner, hon?

    Know this:  The GOP, the conservatives -- label them how you will -- have controlled the agenda of this nation since the day Reagan took office.  The mess they have created will take a couple of generations to clean up.  And while we're busy with that, we're too busy to even think about expanding those terrible, horrible, no-good, very bad social programs.  This means even if another Republican never holds elected office, they have dictated the conditions under which this nation will be governed for another fifty years.

    That's a seventy-five year period of dominance, give or take.  (And if I'm being overly pessimistic -- maybe it only takes us twenty-five years to dig out -- that's still a good long run.) Not bad, tactically speaking.  Certainly not failure.  

    Again, they have done what they set out to do.  Exhibit A:  New Orleans.  That's not an unintended consequence.  Rather, it is an illustration of precisely the government they have set out to create: One that is structurally incapable of responding to even the most basic needs of its ordinary citizens.  

    Mission Accomplished.  

    _____________
    *I maintain that for all the talk of morality, the real reason Clinton was so viciously attacked was because he cut down the deficit the GOP had worked so hard to create.  William Rivers Pitt seems to have reached a similar conclusion:  

    When Bill Clinton stood up during his 1998 State of the Union speech and said "Save Social Security first!" he was actually firing a directed salvo at this wing of the GOP. Look, Clinton was saying, we have trillions of dollars in the bank and the economy is going great guns. We can provide for the neediest among us without bankrupting the government or killing business. In short, he was rendering fiscal conservatives obsolete. He won the argument. Remember this, by the way, the next time someone asks you why he was attacked so viciously.

    And you'll notice the first thing these people did after regaining the White House was eliminate the surplus that Clinton left them...

    "...the big trouble with dumb bastards is that they are too dumb to believe there is such a thing as being smart." -- Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

    by Roddy McCorley on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 11:21:04 AM PDT

  •  Is it just me... or (0+ / 0-)

    does Gallup always give "high positives" to Republicans?  I don't have a database of gathered polls distributed over time, but if memory serves correctly, Gallup polls are always higher for Republicans than other polls.  What's up with that?

    Is it really a poll or just another cog in the PR machine???

    •  it's another poll (0+ / 0-)

      rthere's a House effect that skews R, so the proper thing to do is to look at gallup as a trend compared to itself.

      As a polling entity, they've been extremely open to questions, shared data etc. they should not be maligned as a R tool... they aren't. They're just not always right

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:13:33 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Republicans (0+ / 0-)

    Today's Republican Party: Bad Ideas, Poorly Executed.

  •  A Katrina experiment (0+ / 0-)

    Imagine you could do the following experiment:

    This week, you take a series of photos of the flood and wind damaged regions of the Gulf Coast that objectively depict the situation.

    You then hop into your time machine and visit people anywhere in the US (who see you hop out of said time machine) in early August, 2005.  You show them the photos, and tell them that this is the damage from a humongous storm that will hit that part of the country in the future.

    After they recover from the shock, you then tell them that the storm hit in late August 2005, but it still fucking looks this way in August 2006.

    What percentage of people do you think would believe it?  (dKos members, who know just how awful the Bush Admin. is, excluded.)  

    How angry do you think people would be once you convinced them you were telling the truth?

    Why the bloody hell aren't Americans from coast to coast that angry now???

  •  Backstepping Conservatives (0+ / 0-)

    It is wrong to include Chuck Hagel with McCain and Lieberman as a "backstepping conservative". Hagel has been a constant and responsible critic of the Iraq fiasco. Conservative or not, he deserves respect for bucking his party and putting his country first!

    •  no two people are alike (0+ / 0-)

      Hagel gets credit for being out in front on iraq, but he is a conservative and not a moderate and he himself would not argue the inclusion.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:16:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Sadly (0+ / 0-)

      it would be nice if Hagel were able to put his country before his party in his actions and not just some occasional words. I've give him a bit more credit then.

      "Quidquid dicendum est, libere dicam." -Cicero

      by BennyAbelard on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:44:02 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Centralist here (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BennyAbelard

    and have been here for a while. I got tired of trying to reason with the scared sheep at other sites who were so busy following that Judas goat, Bush, that they were beyond reason.

    One nation, under surveillance, no liberty, nor justice for us

    by SisTwo on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 11:52:33 AM PDT

  •  Hope I am not repeating a comment: (0+ / 0-)

    Just heard Robert Novak say his Evans-Novak report (which is online) is reporting Republicans as saying among themselves that they are going to lose 26 seats.

    We cannot rest on our laurels, regardless. The laws to deny the vote to people who would be Democratic voters have been set up in six states: Florida, Ohio, Arizona, Indiana, Missouri, and California (but Missouri, has no congresscritters up for re-election this year).

  •  Ernesto: potentially grim reminder of Katrina (0+ / 0-)

    As this diary points out, we may be in for a really horrifying reminder on the Katrina front.  I really hope the people of NOLA don't have to suffer another hurricane to remind everyone just how badly the Katrina response was botched.

    --- Please help out with CT-Sen FAQ on dKosopedia

    by robla on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 12:22:16 PM PDT

  •  I wouldn't push "Where's Osama" literally. (0+ / 0-)

    For all we know, the US has already captured Osama Bin Laden and we just don't want the rank and file of Al Qaeda to know that... so whatever intelligence we get out of him is still relevant as far as where we're going to intercept those people and when.

    And what with the liquid explosives plot being publicised/acted on prematurely just to make Lamont look bad, I wouldn't put it past BushCo to blow the lid on the "We've had Osama for a while" as the October Surprise if such were the case.

    Given that potential scenario, I'd rather have the messaging be:  "If Democrats had been in control of congress these last 5 years, we'd have had Osama 4 years ago".  We do this and reenforce the messaging with the failed capture at Tora Bora.

    This way, even if the GoP pulls Osama out of their hat in October, we can say "Took you long enough.  If we hadn't been distracted in Iraq, we'd have had him 4 years ago".

    Of course, we can prove nothing, but being a hypothetical, we don't have to.

  •  bad advice: (0+ / 0-)

    "I would add that Democrats ought to figure out a way to make terrorism--still Bush's lone, if thin asset--a liability as well...with a concerted, simple message rolled out three weeks before the election: 'Where's Osama?'"  per Mann, above.

    Or good advice, if you want to load the dice for the Greed Oil & Perjury party.  Or maybe someone knows for sure that he won't be captured or killed as an October Surprise gift to the neo Cons. (or held in a cell on Diego Garcia until the time  ripens).  Is Nostradamus a Dem?

    Bad advice, very bad.  Even mentioning such a stupid tactic publicly is bad.  O'Rielly will have it up on his commentary segment shortly, just like he did when some knucklehead (or plant) on this blog made a stupid remark about Jews and Lieberman during the Lamont win.

    ps. I haven't read the thread above, so forgive me if this is a reiteration of an obvious point.

    Jorge's a renegade; there's blood on his hands, oil in his arteries and cyanide inside his glands...

    by nailbender on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 01:01:53 PM PDT

  •  Farheed Zakaria is spot on. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Clember

    Democrats should put together a 60-second spot featuring a string of quotes (lies) from Donald Rumsfeld, ending with a statement about the fact that despite Rummy's miserable performance, Bush has not replaced him.  For good measure, maybe throw in the clip of Bush himself saying, "I'm The Decider." Then end with a question like one of the following:

    "Is this the course you want to stay on, America?"

    "Is The Decider deciding what's best for you, America?"

    "What he can't decide for you, America, is your vote for change."

  •  Send them to the basement (0+ / 0-)

    Most of them have never worked under Democratic control and dread the prospect of minority status on Capitol Hill.

    In other words, they think there is going to be payback for the asylum they ran...I hope some sanity is returned to the Congress, but if they are sent to the basement once or twice tohold a hearing, just to understand what a travesty Republican rule was under Delay and Frist, I wouldn't blame Democrats...

    First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you...then you win -- Mahatma Gandhi

    by justmy2 on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 03:13:07 PM PDT

  •  you did a good job in (0+ / 0-)

    your title in differentiating moderates from centrists.

    centrist = neoliberal + neoconservative (note, the link is off the DLC home page.)

    Apparently, the DLC apparently still have forgotten how to read polls:

    Though you'd never know it from surfing the Internet, there exists in the Democratic Party a substantial body of politicians and policymakers who believe the U.S. mission in Iraq must be sustained until it succeeds; who want to intensify American attempts to spread democracy in the greater Middle East; and who think that the Army needs to be expanded to fight a long war against Islamic extremism.

    Does anyone other than Bimini Cat think this has the slightest resemblance to what the polls show is now the center of the American political spectrum?

    "Centrist" in America has nothing to do with political moderation as it would anywhere else in the world, it's just a label the DLC and the idiots that agree with them have co-opted to describe themselves, it's less embarrassing than the far more accurate GOP-lite or Bush-enabler or Friend of Lieberman tags.

    Looking for intelligent energy policy alternatives? Try here.

    by alizard on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 03:51:56 PM PDT

  •  I am so optimistic (0+ / 0-)

    November 7th CANT get here fast enough.  I am leaving Friday for Miami to help my friend Michael Calderin take down an entrenched Rethug, Mario Diaz-Balart.  Can't wait to surf the wave!

  •  And don't forget that the Hawks are bailing out (0+ / 0-)

    too, as the "revolt of the generals shows." Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Batiste, in an interview on NPR 8-26-06 said Iraq was uncontrolled chaos, and renewed his call for Rummy to be jettisoned IMMEDIATELY. The commercial press--most shamefully GE/NBC/MS-NBC--is burying the lead by not covering the story. But the ostrich treatment can't last long ... events are overtaking the policymakers, and the herd of tigers is already out of the bag.

  •  And why do U.S. taxpayers have to (0+ / 0-)

    finance both sides of the "War on Terror"?

    News is what they don't want you to know. Everything else is publicity. --Bill Moyers

    by RobLewis on Sat Aug 26, 2006 at 08:47:03 PM PDT

  •  But don't take them lightly... (0+ / 0-)

    The Republicans are lightweights in actually getting things done, but Heavyweight champions in convincing the public they are the only ones who can get things done.

    http://dontbealemming.com/...

    Posted by the Lemming Herder at Don’t Be A Lemming!

  •  If really "islamofascist" then Republican allies? (0+ / 0-)

    The way we know that various groups out there aren't really "Islamofascist" is that the Republicans haven't tried to make them close allies.

    After all, that's what Republicans traditionally have done:  forged ties with outwardly fascist groups as part of their hatred of modernity and liberalism.

    They did it in WWII, they did it throughout Latin America, they did it worldwide.

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