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The swift boat that backfired.

Well, okay, he "resigned." I think he's gonna go to the Joe Biden oro-verbal rehab center in Rancho Cucamonga, CA. Goes to show you that Bush can be responsive to asshole tendencies IF they piss off rich people. Like big law firms.

Department spokesman Bryan Whitman said Charles "Cully" Stimson, deputy assistant secretary of defense for detainee affairs, told him on Friday that he had made his own decision to resign and was not asked to leave by Defense Secretary Robert Gates.
...
Stimson drew outrage from the legal community — and a disavowal from the Defense Department — for his Jan. 11 comments, in which he also suggested some attorneys were being untruthful about doing the work free of charge and instead were "receiving moneys from who knows where."

He also said companies might want to consider taking their legal business to other firms that do not represent suspected terrorists.
link

"I think, quite honestly, when corporate CEOs see that those firms are representing the very terrorists who hit their bottom line back in 2001, those CEOs are going to make those law firms choose between representing terrorists or representing reputable firms," Stimson told Federal News Radio.

Poor guy, he just got caught up in the spirit of John Yoo: "detainees would just clog up our courts if we gave them any rights...."  I can understand his enthusiasm for that kind of intellectual excellence. But money talks, and you, Mr. Stimson, are the bullshit that walks. Don't worry, you'll get a job tomorrow at a big defense contractor for triple the bucks...be able to put food on yer family....
oh and you might be interested in this,

In World War II, the federal government and the American Bar Association explicitly called on American attorneys to undertake the legal representation of internees of Japanese ancestry -- citizens and aliens alike.
link

Not much of a Friday dump today. Nobody indicted or arrested that we know of, and only one guy wants to spend more time with his family.

Unless you count the NIE as a Friday dump, and THAT is a freakin' whopper.

Originally posted to seesdifferent on Fri Feb 02, 2007 at 02:46 PM PST.

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Comment Preferences

  •  well, well, well (5+ / 0-)

    Did he jump, or was he pushed?  Jonathan Turley called this one - well he said the man should not be allowed to keep his job.

    Right on!

    ````
    peace

  •  Is Stimson a lawyer? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fritzrth

    If so, this retirement will give him time to do a little pro bono work. :-)

    "It does not require many words to speak the truth." -- Chief Joseph, native American leader (1840-1904)

    by highfive on Fri Feb 02, 2007 at 02:52:05 PM PST

  •  This is already being discussed (0+ / 0-)

    here.

    [-6.25, -5.59] If it weren't for physics and law enforcement, I'd be unstoppable.

    by Phil N DeBlanc on Fri Feb 02, 2007 at 02:53:03 PM PST

  •  Ok, Ok you've had your fun (4+ / 0-)

    Now look over there at gavin newsom and those San Francisco values like a good little drone. nothing to see here move along. Pay no attention to the things you are told did not really happen.

    you do NOT want me to stop this car!

  •  Stimson probably won't get a job with a (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fritzrth, kingubu

    big time law firm after what he did either.

    So I found this rather interesting bio about him from his alma mater Kenyon College...

    Eye of the Storm

    Charles Stimson '86 leaves his house every day for a job fraught with pressure. "This is the hardest thing I've ever done," he says, "and it takes a huge toll on my family."

    Poor Baby...

    "As the primary policy advisor, I am the focal point in the department of defense for all things related to detainees," says Stimson. "I want to make sure we are treating detainees everywhere in Department of Defense custody humanely, consistent with our values, and our domestic and international legal obligations as a country.

    Bullshit

    [As an English major] ...Stimson still recalls how Turner savored the line from Love's Labors Lost, "Behold the window of my heart, mine eye." Says Stimson, "I've used that line as a prosecutor during trials."

    Oh Pleeeease.

    Stimson regards his duty as a privilege and an honor. "We give extraordinary care and treatment to the detainees," he says. "We are trying to do the right thing."

    Lying sod.

  •  This tells us something (4+ / 0-)

    Stimson's resignation reveals two things, one about people in general and the other about the culture in the pentagon.

    The pentagon first:  I suspect that within those walls we would find a "corporate culture" which encourages the views so foolishly expressed out loud by Stimson.  Had he thought for one moment that anyone in the office gang would take him to task for his remarks, he'd not have made them.  He probably returned to the office thinking he'd get a pat on the back for what he'd said.  He knew he'd merely given broader voice to what everyone in the place said around the water cooler anyway...

    Now, people in general:  When we know that no one in the village likes us anymore, we start to feel bad - even sorry for ourselves - and sooner or later we leave in search of someplace where we're wanted, or at least not openly glared at and farted on.  Stimson probably did get some pats on the back for his remarks.  Until the negative publicity started piling up from "out there."  Then he became a wart on their noses and they turned on him.  Shoot, maybe that dynamic could be the subject of yet a third thing his resignation teaches us, but I'm out of gas.

    "Democracy must be something more than two wolves and a sheep voting on what to have for dinner." - James Bovard

    by Gasonfires on Fri Feb 02, 2007 at 03:19:32 PM PST

    •  I actually Stimson is a bit like James Watt. (6+ / 0-)

      An overt ideologue who failed to understand that if he carried out his ideological mission (which is an approved mission) in a too austentacious fashion, he would have to be sacraficed for the good of the cause.  In other words, he got noticed and thus had to be removed so they could carry on pressuring people to stop upholding the Constitution.  His replacement will be just as mis-guided and evil, but will probably be a bit more subtle.

      •  If such a sense of... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        fritzrth, inclusiveheart, Gasonfires

        ... "keep it down or they'll notice" exists, why is Cheney still there?

        Those who begin coercive elimination of dissent soon find themselves exterminating dissenters. --Justice Robert H. Jackson

        by kingubu on Fri Feb 02, 2007 at 04:09:29 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Cause when you are Cheney and have (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          fritzrth, kingubu

          risen to the appex of power, you get to do whatever you want.  The minions are responsible for covering the tracks and not taking the limelight from the royalty...

          Cheney did it.  I am actually amazed at how many people commented recently that Cheney must have changed because they thought he was a reasonable guy until he became VP.  My perspective on Cheney is that he has always been a virulent nutcase, but just put more effort into conceling his true identity prior to his vice presidency.

          •  True dat. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            fritzrth, inclusiveheart

            My perspective on Cheney is that he has always been a virulent nutcase, but just put more effort into concealing his true identity prior to his vice presidency.

            While the pentagon strike on 9/11 certainly scared him enough to stop pretending ("eeeeeek! it could've been MEEEE!!!") his views have never changed over the years. Those who are arguing now that Spotted Dick is somehow different are only trying to distance themselves from his unpopularity.

            Though, I think its partly "the Soprano Principle", too. That is, the closer you are socially to someone, the easier it is to ignore/justify the evil and crazy things they do.

            Those who begin coercive elimination of dissent soon find themselves exterminating dissenters. --Justice Robert H. Jackson

            by kingubu on Fri Feb 02, 2007 at 04:38:10 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I found out over xmas that he tried to (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              fritzrth, kingubu

              destroy my father after Watergate.  I never knew that.  Oddly, I had terrible misgivings about him without that information.  In 2000, my Nader and Bush-leaner friends always got a talk from me about how pernicious he was and that we couldn't risk letting him in.  Too bad I wasn't convincing enough.  A lot of people really didn't understand what kind of man Cheney really is.

              •  That just sucks. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                inclusiveheart

                But I'm totally not surprised.

                And, while you can't take too much responsibility for the Bush/Cheney disaster on yourself, one of the things that scares me most about the last 6 or so years is exactly that The Old Familes™ allowed such a perfect storm of venality and ignorance to make it to the top of the heap.

                The way I've come to see it, the DC culture that persists irrespective of which party is in power is supposed to be a sort of invisible check on crazy radicalism, yet, clearly, that system broke down in this case. Any insight into that?

                Those who begin coercive elimination of dissent soon find themselves exterminating dissenters. --Justice Robert H. Jackson

                by kingubu on Fri Feb 02, 2007 at 05:46:11 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Insight... (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  kingubu

                  The DLC yielded our turf.  That is why I really can't support HRC in any way shape or form.  I was open minded when she went to the Senate, but the IWR was the tell tale on the Clintons for me.  I have to say that I gave them the benefit of the doubt for far too long.  Our party was pulled to the supposed "pragmatic" side and in reality we were pulled to the anti-Constitution and substance side of the debate.  The Clintons and the DLC for some reason unclear to me thought that by capitulating they would be able to hold on to power.  In the end, they all turned out to be a bunch of suckers.  I mean why would the Rightwing want to give them any power if they knew they could have it all to themselves?  Why would people who want to destroy our Constitutional system want to just go part way when they could have it all?

                  I put my hope and faith into Pelosi because I knew her; my father worked with her and respected her; and she has remained consistent in her views.  There are good people on the Hill.  Not as many now as there were at other times in history, but still there are.  Our problem still is taht we need cull our representatives to better represent our party.  It will take time.  Lieberman may be one of the best things that ever happened to us if we paly this right.  The double edged sword - create doubt without creating cynicism (because cynicism always helps the GOP a lot more than it helps us).  Watergate is a cautionary tale about the dangers of the rise of cynicism which ultimatly led to the Reagan era.  People were so discouraged and angry that they threw everything patriotic and nationalistic out the window and voted exclusively for themselves and their own interests.  It was the end of a brand of nationalism that had emerged in the Depression/WWII Era which prevailed for decades to advance this country to super-power status; and the end of that era suited the GOP because it meant that they could define the society - disinterest and anger created a huge opening for them.  That is one major reason that I always am reticent to jump on the "everyone in Washigton Sucks" bandwagon.  For one thing it is not true and the other thing is to take that attitude is to give them a pass and allow them to suck.  It is important to be unyielding about our requirements.  We must NEVER allow them to take excuses that we kindly offer them because we are being humane etc.   Because they will use them against us to both retain their power and screw us at the same time.  The thing is that every person is potentially an abuser of their power.  The only thing that stops them is another person's participation in the process keeping them in line.  When we don't participate, we are the only losers.  That is what the GOP understands all too clearly.

                  •  Hmmmm... (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    inclusiveheart

                    The Clintons and the DLC for some reason unclear to me thought that by capitulating they would be able to hold on to power.

                    I think the DLC/Third Way/New Dem horseshit was a originally intended to provide a way to level the field in the money game by carving off some of the GOP's deep-pocketed big-business donors. It was a smart strategy in '92, but, sadly, when Clinton won, that strategy and its people were wrongly transformed from "a good plan for this specific cycle" into "the way to win from now on" and institutionalized in the party.

                    I couldn't agree more with your take on how cynicism continues to help the GOP. Its a hard tide to fight, but whenever I run into the "meh, fuck it; they're all the same." bit, I try to turn it back on the speaker. "They only work for you. Its your job to keep an eye on them, and to make they do what's right." It pretty much never works, but that doesn't stop me from trying.

                    Those who begin coercive elimination of dissent soon find themselves exterminating dissenters. --Justice Robert H. Jackson

                    by kingubu on Fri Feb 02, 2007 at 06:57:28 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  It was meant to level the playing field - (0+ / 0-)

                      that is certainly true - but they were the only politicians in my lifetime that were dumb enough to believe that if they both betrayed their voters and stayed true to the big money in the limited ways they could (so as to not totally betray their voters) they could really hold on to power.

                      The reality is that there is no one in this life who gives you money who wants 50-75% of what they could get if they went elsewhere.  We all want 100% AT LEAST if not 150-200% for our trouble.  Democrats for better or for worse only have a real chance of survival as a party if they return to their populist roots in both words and deeds because we can't offer more than 75% of the corporate etc. agenda and still get our voters to the polls.  Anything less and the "big money donors" (us) will abandon the Dems the same way they did during the Clinton era.  You know, there is very big money in $100 donations as long as people actually like and believe in you.  The problem is that HRC and the DLC don't understand us.  I won't claim that others do, but I know they don't for sure.

                      •  The New Populism (1+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        inclusiveheart

                        Democrats for better or for worse only have a real chance of survival as a party if they return to their populist roots in both words and deeds because we can't offer more than 75% of the corporate etc. agenda and still get our voters to the polls.

                        Ah, its like music to my ears...

                        I don't get it. HRC could largely counteract the base's ambivalence about her stand on the war by taking up the populist mantle and yet she persists in treating her most loyal constituencies like the homely guy she sleeps with, but is ashamed to date in public. She is trying to it play down the middle when the wind is at her back. Its maddening.

                        Those who begin coercive elimination of dissent soon find themselves exterminating dissenters. --Justice Robert H. Jackson

                        by kingubu on Fri Feb 02, 2007 at 11:02:04 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

    •  I suspect that a right wing think tank (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Gasonfires

      or two may be eager to hire him now.

      "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities" -- Voltaire

      by ohwilleke on Fri Feb 02, 2007 at 04:23:37 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Just thank you for spotting this, perhaps (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fritzrth, seesdifferent, Gasonfires

    the fact that Abu Gonzales was questioned about Stimson by Patrick Leahy may have finally been annoying enough to have the ass fired?

  •  Friday news dump. Or in Stimson's case... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fritzrth, seesdifferent

    ...garbage dump.

    But, there's a lot more trash to be cleaned out of the White House.

    And the airing of a lot of dirty laundry.

    Spring Cleaning in the form of congressional hearings and impeachment?

    Forget your stupid theme park! I'm gonna make my own! With hookers! And blackjack! In fact, forget the theme park! --Bender

    by catzilla on Fri Feb 02, 2007 at 03:25:44 PM PST

  •  Sadly, there is no reason to think he was fired. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fritzrth, seesdifferent

    The Pentagon only mildly separated itself from his remarks. If the Sec Def or Bush had condemned the statements I'd feel a tiny bit better. But they did not, because at bottom they agreed with him and saw no political advantage to attacking his position. In part, because it would open up other detainee/torture issues.

    This Administration is so far beyond redemption, on even the most basic things.

  •  Na Na Na Na, Na Na Na Na.. (0+ / 0-)

    ...hey hey, goodbye!

    "Heckuva job, Cully!"

    9-11 changed everything? Well, Katrina changed it back.

    by varro on Fri Feb 02, 2007 at 04:21:28 PM PST

  •  Good catch! (0+ / 0-)

    Nice to see the right thing happen every once in a while.

    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities" -- Voltaire

    by ohwilleke on Fri Feb 02, 2007 at 04:21:34 PM PST

  •  He accomplished his purpose. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fritzrth

    He called out the names of the firms, and now will retire to a wrong wing idiot gaggle to devise more schemes for Murka.

  •  I think his big mistake was in saying aloud (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fritzrth

    the things that all republicans think, but don't speak about publicly.  

    If he had taken the matter up with a more experienced republican, those pro bono lawyers would have lost their jobs without ever being able to prove why.  

    He'll be working for this administration again as soon as this blows over.


    The religious fanatics didn't buy the republican party because it was virtuous, they bought it because it was for sale

    by nupstateny on Fri Feb 02, 2007 at 04:45:01 PM PST

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