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Permission from  This Week in Palestine to repost from Rima Nasir Tarazi's The Palestinian National Song: A Personal Testimony and Kamal Nasir: The Conscience and the Poet

Beloved, if word of my death reaches you
And the lovers cry out:
The loyal one has departed, his visage gone forever,
And fragrance has died within the bosom of the flower
Shed no tears...smile on life
And tell my only one, my loved one,
The dark recesses of your father's being
Have been touched by visions of his people.

From Kamal Nasir's Last Poem

"When you are the underdog in the fight, your weak position gives you the opportunity to fight on the side of beauty," said Golden Globe winner Hani Abu Assad to the Guardian.  

"When you only have beauty to express yourself, to fight with, then you establish a feeling for beauty, for how you create from the ugly side of civilization."

Palestine's poets attest to Abu Assad's assertion and, in a telling reminder that the pen is mightier than the sword, are often targets of Israel's executioners.

The most famous, Ghassan Kanafani, was killed in 1972, along with his fourteen year old niece, in a car bombing attack in Beirut. Both Basam Abu Sharif and Anis Sayegh, a researcher who never held a gun in his life, were maimed from letter bombs.  According to Sayegh,

The Zionists dealt with the Arab intellect in the same way it dealt with the Arab weapon. And they fought them in the same way they fought the resistance fighters of the Palestinians and Arabs who are defending their people’s right. They saw a gun in the book, an ammunition depot in the school, condemnation in the files and a time bomb in the open truth.

One of many Palestinian intellectuals, who had nothing to do with the killing of the athletes at Munich's Olympics, Kamal Nasir, Palestinian poet, was murdered in his bed on April 10, 1973, by Israel's Ehud Barak, dressed up like a woman.

Recently, Barak bragged about his Lebanon exploits in the Washington Post, whose reporter ignorantly dismisses Nasir, as well as Kamal Udwan, Abel Yusuf Al Najjar, Najjar's wife, and 100 other people who were killed that day as "terrorists."

"'It wasn't something new -- we were in this business,' Barak said in an interview. In 1973, in Beirut, wearing high heels and a woman's wig, Barak helped gun down three of the terrorists who murdered 11 Israeli athletes at the Munich Olympics. 'I was a brunette, I had a strawberry blonde behind me,' Barak said, with a small smile."

I first heard of Kamal Nasir from my late father, Baseel, who knew Nasir in Ramallah. My father was born in 1922.  Nasir was born in Gaza in 1925, but his family lived in Bir Zeit, a stone's throw from Ramallah.  I was somewhat annoyed that my father, long since ensconced in the states, had not heard of Mahmoud Darwish, famous contemporary Palestinian poet.  "Do you know Kamal Nasir?" he challenged. "He was killed in front of his wife by Ehud Barak," he said angrily.

Musician Rima Nasir Tarazi, President of the Administrative Board
of the General Union of Palestinian Women,  recalls

Between 1954 and 1956, Kamal Nasir was staying at his home in Birzeit and would pour his soul out in passionate verses singing praises to the beautiful lost homeland and calling on the masses to stand up for their rights. He would put his poems before the three of us and we would decide amongst ourselves which to choose. His song, "Ya Akhi El-Lajea," (Oh, My Refugee Brother) adapted to the music of Fleifel immediately after the Catastrophe, had already become a landmark song widely known all over Palestine. It was a call to rise and to act against injustice and to stand up against attempts at humiliating our people and bartering their rights for meagre food rations: "They offered us poison in our food / turning us into a docile and silent flock of sheep."

Tarazi writes that Nasir "was writing an elegy to a friend" when he was killed. "His body was found with hands outstretched, his mouth and right hand riddled with bullets."

Sina Rahmani paraphrases Edward Said:

"Another saddening story he [Said] tells is that of the death of PLO spokesmen Kamal Nasir. Nasir was babysitting for a relative of Said who had gone with Said to Jordan to bury an aunt who had recently passed away. That very night that the two of them had left for Jordan, Nasir was assassinated by an Israeli strike team lead by Ehud Barak, who would become Prime Minister more than two decades later. Exemplifying the vindictiveness of the Israeli attitude towards Palestinians, the eloquent poet and writer Nasir was found riddled with bullets in his mouth and his right hand."

"His poetic talents," Tarazi writes,

which appeared early in childhood, were nurtured by the annual Suq Okath (a traditional Arab poetry contest) held at the College [Bir Zeit] and in which he always extemporized and excelled. He completed his education at the American University of Beirut where he won the prestigious poetry prize for his poem "The Orphan."

By murdering Nasir, who was exiled from Jordan only to return and be deported again by Israel along with hundreds of other Palestinian intellectuals in 1967, Israel "was to demonstrate, once again," according to Tarazi, "its commitment to destroying any embodiment of Palestinian identity and any resistance to its attempts at establishing facts on the ground. Thinkers and writers were viewed as a threat."

Ariel Sharon's legacy wrote Edward Said, will be that of an Arab killer, as will that of Nasir's gleeful executor, Ehud Barak.  Kamal Nasir was a threat, but contrary to his rather stupid and short-sighted executioners' expectations, he remains a threat to Israel's injustice; it is in part from his painful experience of the "ugly side of civilization," that he created a wealth of beauty that will inspire and instruct "so long as men can breathe, or eyes can see." It is the legacy which my late father, neither a poet, nor an intellectual, bequeathed to me one day while we were talking in his Central California backyard.

Nasir will always be  remembered as a man with boundless love for his people and for humanity as a whole. His charm, compassion and tolerance won him several friends and admirers among people from all walks of life. As a poet, he was widely acclaimed for eloquently expressing the hopes and pains of his people, and advocating their cause. His charismatic public appearances were a source of inspiration to the masses that flocked to listen to him at every possible occasion.

Kamal Nasir's Last Poem addresses exile and the longing for return as he admonishes his "beloved,"

Tell my only one, for I love him,
That I have tasted the joy of giving
And my heart relishes the wounds of sacrifice.
There is nothing left for him
Save the sighs from my song...Save the remnants of my lute
Lying piled and scattered in our house.
Tell my only one if he ever visits my grave
And yearns for my memory,
Tell him one day that I shall return
--to pick the fruits.

 In  Letter to Fadwa, Nasir anticipates his death, inspires hope, emits courage, and conveys beauty:

If my songs should reach you
despite the narrow skies around me,
remember that I will return to life,
to the quest for liberty,
remember that my people may call on my soul
and feel it rising again from the folds of the earth
.

Rahmani, Sina. "Edward Said: The Last Interview, and: Selves and Others: A Portrait of Edward Said, and: The Battle of Algiers (review)" Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, Volume 25, Number 2, 2005,
Duke University Press, pp. 512-514.

Originally posted to umkahlil on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 03:54 PM PDT.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (13+ / 0-)

    Shukran

    Beauty is truth, truth Beauty,
    That's all ye know on Earth,
    And all ye need to know. John Keats

  •  shukran ghazilan n/t (0+ / 0-)
  •  Yeah... (6+ / 0-)

    ...I'm sure that the idea behind Operation Spring of Youth was to destroy a concept of Palestinian identity and to kill a Palestinian poet.  It had nothing at all to do, I'm sure, with killing Muhammad Youssef Al-Najjar, commonly known as Abu Youssef, who was an operations leader of Black September and a key figure in the Munich Olympic Massacre.

    The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

    by Jay Elias on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 04:00:18 PM PDT

    •  Extra Judicial Executions (5+ / 0-)

      violate international law.  He could have just as easily been arrested and tried.  This is what As'ad AbuKhalil says about Abu Yusuf An-Najjar, as well as well as providing other information regarding the actions of Israel before Munich:

      Abu Yusuf An-Najjar was in charge of intelligence in Lebanon—Lebanon, not Europe. While `Udwan had no knowledge of Munich, Abu Yusuf may have heard about it but had no role whatever in it. The third person was a poet: and you know how much Israelis like to murder Palestinian poets, artists, and writers. Kamal Nasir was a poet, and was killed in his bed.

      http://angryarab.blogspot.com/...

      •  Well... (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        dufffbeer, another American, MBNYC, Eric S

        ...on the international law, I don't give a damn - releasing the three captured Munich terrorists was against international and German law too, but it didn't hold anyone back.  Oh, and I still don't care.

        Of course, the point is not to defend Operation Spring of Youth on my part - I am not inclined to.  It is to expose your diary for a bunch of highly selective, misleading, and ultimately dishonest propaganda.

        The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

        by Jay Elias on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 04:13:50 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  To clarify... (3+ / 0-)

        ...if you wrote about Operation Spring of Youth to suggest that it was illegal or that Abu Youssef was actually uninvolved with Munich, that would be one thing.  But to suggest that the mission to assassinate Abu Youssef, which resulted in the death of Nasir who was living in the same PLO compound, was actually about killing Nasir or "destroying Palestinian identity" is a lie on its face.

        I won't even go into the notion of attacking Barak right as he is the main alternative to a renewed Netanyahu in Israeli politics.  Of course, from what I can see of your work, helping Netanyahu win seems to be in your interest.

        The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

        by Jay Elias on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 04:24:19 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Each (4+ / 0-)

          lived in  his own apartment in an upscale modern building in one of Beirut's nicest districts.  I really can't engage with your nonsense anymore. You have no clue what you're talking about.  

          •  Yes... (0+ / 0-)

            ...in a single compound set up by the PLO in the Varden district - I'm not an idiot.

            MY nonsense.  That's fucking rich.  

            The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

            by Jay Elias on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 04:33:09 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  From Wiki: (7+ / 0-)

              The main target was a pair of seven-story buildings in the fashionable neighborhood of Verdun in West Beirut. These buildings were residential housing for both British and Italian families amongst other Arab families. The building housing Muhammad Youssef Al-Najjar (Abu Youssef) had two British families and was next door to a boarding school run by the Catholic Salesian order. The second seven story building was on the opposite side of the road and was residential. This building housed an Italian family amongst other Arab families. There were two targets in this building, Kamal Adwan and Kamal Nasser. The Italian grandmother was killed in this building by the Israeli forces who stormed the wrong apartment at first.

              •  Verdun... (0+ / 0-)

                ...not Varden.  Thanks.

                One compound - two buildings.  Does my ability to understand urban locations need more work?

                The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

                by Jay Elias on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 04:47:35 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  No, your fact is correct... (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Rusty Pipes, planyourday, umkahlil

                  but some might see referring to a "PLO compound" without mentioning that innocent families lived in the same building, a member of whom was killed by mistake, as being selective framing.

                  •  I'd agree with that... (4+ / 0-)

                    ...if I felt that I wasn't responding to a claim and was instead advancing one of my own.

                    This is my biggest complaint about how these issues are handled here at Daily Kos.  I oppose targeted killings.  I oppose the occupation.  Yet, the sort of scurrilous charges advanced in diaries such as this one end up placing me in the position of saying that things I abhor are not as abhorrent as they are being portrayed for political purposes.

                    Several innocents were killed in Operation Spring of Youth.  As I mention downthread, in some Wrath of God missions, only innocents were killed.  That is not the same thing as saying that Operation Wrath of God was a mission to hunt down cultural icons.

                    The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

                    by Jay Elias on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 05:01:14 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Palestinian Intellectuals (0+ / 0-)

                      are quoted in the post including Palestinian researcher and letter bomb victim, Anis Sayegh, and Rima Nasir Tarzai, musician, head of the Edward Said Conservatory, and head of the the General Association of Palestinian Women. These are the words of respected members of our community:

                      The Zionists dealt with the Arab intellect in the same way it dealt with the Arab weapon. And they fought them in the same way they fought the resistance fighters of the Palestinians and Arabs who are defending their people’s right. They saw a gun in the book, an ammunition depot in the school, condemnation in the files and a time bomb in the open truth.

                      Anis Sayegh

                      Israel "was to demonstrate, once again," according to Tarazi, "its commitment to destroying any embodiment of Palestinian identity and any resistance to its attempts at establishing facts on the ground. Thinkers and writers were viewed as a threat."

                      •  And these Palestinian intellectuals... (1+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        dufffbeer

                        ...are qualified, in some way, to speak to Israeli intent?

                        This is why respect for Said himself is limited - what is intellectual about reasoning that finds the motives for one element in the conflict in the feels of the other element?

                        The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

                        by Jay Elias on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 05:28:26 PM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  Yes (1+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          Noah in NY

                          One usually analyzes based upon evidence.  

                          Researcher gets letter bomb; reseacher who has never handled a gun in his life.  Analyses: Israel has something against Palestinian researchers.

                          Gifted writer, Ghassan Kanafani, gets blown up in his car by Israeli Mossad.  Analysis: Israel targets intellectuals

                          Hall of Records gets blown up in Nablus; Hall of Records has at least one hundred years of documents; analysis, Israel wants to destroy infrastructure, records . . .

                          Israel demolishes 531 Palestinian villages
                          Analysis: Israel doesn't want refugees to return

                          Kahlil Sakakini Cultural Center damaged
                          Analysis:

                          etc., etc.

                    •  I think (8+ / 0-)

                      most people that read dKos, certainly not all, but most understand that any diary is framed through the author. There will always be biases and facts have to be checked.

                      The author describes the killing of a poet and places it in context of other Palestinian poets that were killed or maimed. It's readily apparent that the author is pro-Palestinian and will frame the facts from that point of view. Unless the facts are wrong, or the diary contains a gross omission, (and as long as it isn't some personal, ethnic, or racist attack) that is okay, we will all see the frame around the picture.

                      Of course, it's your right to argue the facts and the frame. But I read this piece, and it didn't seem to me that the author was trying to say the Spring of Youth operation was about hunting down cultural icons-- just that at the end of that night, a poet was dead.

                      I usually stay well clear of I/P diaries because they almost reflexively devolve into fights and are of little educational use. Don't know what the answer is to that problem. But I liked this diary, it was an interesting, personalized story and I liked the poetry. The author's bias is easy to recognize and read through.

        •  The problem with extrajudicial assassinations (5+ / 0-)

          is exactly this.  There is no way to ensure that innocents not be swept up with the guilty.

          I'd never heard of Kamal Nasir before reading this diary.  But I did a little googling after reading your comment, and absolutely every detail provided by umkahlil checks out.

          There's no lie here, none whatsoever.

          •  Only the framing is a lie (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            dufffbeer, another American

            Not who he was (although he sure does downplay his role in the PLO).

            To pretend that he was killed as a part of a nefarious plot against Palestinian identity is crap - purely.  I make no defense of Operation Wrath of God here, nor do I intend to.  But the whole frame here is utter crap.

            The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

            by Jay Elias on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 04:35:23 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  That's where Palestinians and Israelis (4+ / 0-)

              will probably always disagree.

              What I take out of it is that if Israel had followed the rule of law, we wouldn't even be having this argument today.

              You know, I'm thinking of Eichmann here.  He was kidnapped out of Argentina, and then smuggled back into Israel for trial and execution.

              If you compare the crimes at Munich with those of Eichmann, who comes off worse?

              Why, then, does Eichmann rate a trial, and the Palestinians a bullet to the head?

              •  Again... (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                dufffbeer

                ...you are conflating my position with one in support of extra-judicial killings.

                Downthread, I mention the most blatant error of the Mossad's history, the assassination of a Moroccan waiter in Norway.  That is what such actions lead to.  So, I'm not going to pretend I support them.

                The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

                by Jay Elias on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 04:45:06 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  btw... (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                dufffbeer, another American

                ...when we can agree that the Mossad took Wrath of God as an opportunity to not only attack the participants in Munich, but also against the leaders of the PLO and Black September in general (and the two groups shared many leaders), and we can agree that we don't support extra-judicial killings, why can you not address at all the totally unsubstantiated claims of the diary that this mission had "nothing to do with Munich" and that it was merely an attempt to attack the Palestinian identity by killing a poet (which, I'm sure, trumped his role as a PLO spokesperson to the Mossad)?

                The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

                by Jay Elias on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 04:51:04 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  I can't speak for umkahlil (6+ / 0-)

                  but the way I understood the diary, the reference of "nothing to do with Munich" was to Nasir.

                  AFAIK, he had no involvement in Munich and was caught up in the Israeli bloodlust in the aftermath.

                  I really don't know enough about the operation to offer informed opinions, but given what I recall of the time -- when I was still a Zionist -- I didn't think there was a difference between Black September and the PLO.  They were all terrorists in my mind, and killing one would be as good as killing any of them.

                  In that sense, I can certainly understand the diary as speaking a Palestinian truth about Nasir's murder.  Nasir would have been an effective spokesperson for the Palestinian cause because he was a poet, a humanist, and an intellectual.  Murdering him along with terrorists allows you to portray all Palestinians as terrorists.

                  I never heard of Nasir before tonight.  For most of the 1970s, I definitely believed that "Palestinian" equaled "terrorist."  I wouldn't be surprised if that equivalence was in part a product of operations like the one we're talking about.

                  •  Well... (2+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    dufffbeer, another American

                    ...statements like "bloodlust" are where you lose me entirely - to suggest that the desire to eliminate not only those who actually participate in atrocities against you but also the leadership of organizations which support and plan such actions is "bloodlust" is simply completely irrational thinking.  That does not mean that such actions are either smart or productive, but borne out of "bloodlust" they are not.

                    Pretending that the PLO in the 1970s was not a terrorist organization is simply foolishness.  Reading about Nasir, it seems clear that he had deep reservations about these missions on the part of the PLO, and that killing him was definitely not a success in the fight against the PLO at that time.  But to suggest that Israel could or did perceive that entirely at the time, following Munich and Ma'alot, is based on no evidence and specious in its logic.

                    I've never been comfortable with the targeted killing of even the most hardened terrorists.  Nothing is served by that that is not served better by having open trials of these people.  But we also do no favors to anyone by kidding ourselves about what the PLO was up to in the early 1970s.

                    The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

                    by Jay Elias on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 05:34:38 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  It was a revelation to me years later (2+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      Rusty Pipes, Noah in NY

                      that there was such a thing as the Palestine National Congress, composed of elected officials, that had the formal role of governing the PLO.

                      Growing up Zionist in the US, I had thought the PLO was the personal creation of Yasser Arafat, a terrorist mastermind with a perpetual three-day growth of beard.

                      I don't know what the Mossad knew and didn't know in 1973. I do know at that time it had the reputation as the most sophisticated and savvy intelligence agency in the world, and it racked up what was always portrayed to us as a string of remarkable successes in fighting terrorism.

                      If the Mossad didn't know the broad outlines of the factions within the PLO, it was incompetent.  I don't believe it was incompetent.

                      Munich is in my mind the most dramatic of the huge number of horrific events in the history of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.  I'm certain the Israeli leadership at the time was also horrified, and they felt a strong need to strike out in revenge.

                      You acknowledge as much when you write:

                      But to suggest that Israel could or did perceive that entirely at the time, following Munich and Ma'alot, is based on no evidence and specious in its logic.

                      I chose to characterize that loss of rationality as bloodlust.  If you choose to call it something else, that's ok.  We're just quibbling over words, because I believe we mostly agree on what it is we wish to describe with those words.

                      •  Well... (2+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        litho, Rusty Pipes

                        ...I suppose then we are quibbling over semantics, in which case, I'll let it go.

                        I think that the history of the Wrath of God missions shows without a doubt that the Mossad was incompetent in many basic ways.  They sent a bunch of first-time operatives to Norway to assassinate their number one target, and ended up killing a waiter.  Indeed, I think the basic setup of Wrath of God was deeply flawed.

                        The more we learn, the more the myth of the superhumanity of the Mossad, Sayeret Matkal, and the IDF in general is exposed.  When I served, I learned that the legendary Sayeret Matkal (the commandos which included Barak, and who pulled off Entebbe) have a fatality rate of over 50%.  Several leading members of the unit, including a Major, have been refuseniks in recent years.

                        I think that both you and I are still, to a degree, reacting to the myth of the Israeli military's brilliance, and not seeing it as the deeply flawed organization it has always been.

                        The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

                        by Jay Elias on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 05:55:36 PM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                  •  btw... (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    litho

                    ...I don't conflate you with the diarist, nor with anyone else litho.  You as much as anyone here have more than earned my crediting you with only your statements and views and those of no others.

                    The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it. ~ H.L. Mencken

                    by Jay Elias on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 05:39:29 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                •  "Who had nothing to do with (0+ / 0-)

                  the killing of the athletes...."

                  Unless you're referring to a passage I skimmed over too quickly and missed, it's not "the mission" as you write, but the man, Kamal Nasir, who had "nothing to do with..." as umkahlil writes.

                  And that is correct.  He did not.

                  Hanan Ashrawi was an early PLO member and was until the formalization of political parties led by Fatah and the end of references to the PNA as the PLO.  I never hear her associated with crimes because she was a PLO member the way other Palestinians are grouped.  She's just one example.  I don't understand the excuse so often given in the deaths of innocent Palestinians...that they weren't just themselves; they were also members of (insert resistance group here).

                  Everyone is talking about crime... Tell me who are the criminals. - "Equal Rights," Peter Tosh

                  by Nastja Polisci on Sat Apr 28, 2007 at 03:19:25 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

  •  So I take it you're not a (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dufffbeer, Doughnutman, MBNYC, zemblan

    Steven Spielberg fan. BTW, you do realize that this is blog concerned with American Democratic politics, the American political system and getting Democrats elected to office in the United States of America yes? You seem like someone who boarded the wrong bus.

    "Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest." ~ Diderot

    by Bouwerie Boy on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 04:34:13 PM PDT

  •  Basam Abu Sharif, according to the diarist, (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JPhurst, Doughnutman, MBNYC, zemblan

    never held a gun. Perhaps umkahlil has spent sufficient time with Abu Sharif to be sure of that. But if so, it's a highly misleading fact. While there is much to admire about the later stages of Abu Sharif's career, and without endorsing a policy of targeted assassinations, it is worth noting that Basam Abu Sharif, as the publicity for his 1995 memoir The Best of Enemies: The Memoirs of Bassam Abu-Sharif and Uzi Mahnaimi puts it, "helped mastermind terrorist spectaculars."

    Time Magazine called him "the face of terror" because of his role in the multiple hijacking, and then destruction, of Pan Am Swissair, and TWA aircraft in the Jordanian Desert in 1970. Abu Sharif also recruited Carol the Jackal to the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. See here.

    Al Gore should be president.

    by another American on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 05:50:48 PM PDT

  •  From the links you've posted (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MBNYC

    I don't come away with the idea that Nasir was targeted. But for the sake of argument I will for a second assume he was a target. I would think he matters more to the Israelis as the voice of the PLO then as a poet. In their mind he would seem like a worthy target,  because if they silenced the PLO's voice to the rest of the world hopefully that would lead to the rest of the world supporting Israel.

    What would prevent Captain America from being a hero "Death, Maybe"

    by Doughnutman on Thu Apr 26, 2007 at 10:02:15 PM PDT

  •  Thanks for the diary, umkahlil! n/t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    callmecassandra

    Evenhanded Democrats, because "the role of honest broker must once again be played by Washington"

    by Rusty Pipes on Fri Apr 27, 2007 at 02:21:08 PM PDT

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