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I'm still beating the drums for the Iraq Moratorium project here, with the IM website rollout days away (he said, knocking wood) and the daily calender pages flipping, like in an old movie, toward the first Moratorium Day, September 21.

This time I have an actual teaser from the soon-to-go-live IM website, a short historical piece on the Vietnam Moratorium of October 15, 1969, an event which serves as model and inspiration for the current project. Months ago I briefly diaried that historic event right here and a couple of days back, One Pissed Off Liberal name-checked it or rather (we are talking OPOL here) image-checked it, in a diary which earned many recs.

This brief summation holds a lot of lessons, especially as it gets augmented, I hope, by the memories of Kossacks who were there. One point worth highlighting is the fact that this unanticipated (even by its organizers) eruption was organized at the local level, often by people who had had little involvement in previous anti-war protests. And that's where the activities that involved several million people took place, at the local level.

                THE VIETNAM MORATORIUM

By June of 1969, the Vietnam War had produced fissures within families, communities and the US population as a whole deeper than anything the country had seen since the Civil War. A powerful anti-war movement had exposed the government's lies, had mobilized millions and had leaked into the Armed Forces.

In the four short years since the first national protest in April 1965, that anti-war movement had become a force to be reckoned with. The war had cost Lyndon Baines Johnson the presidency in 1968-challenged by anti-war Democrats, he refused to run for re-election. In his place, the war had elected Richard Nixon, based on his campaign's lying claim that he had a "secret plan" to end it.

But by June of 1969, the anti-war movement was struggling for direction. Big anti-war marches, derided by young militants as "peace crawls" drew hundreds of thousands. Dr. Martin Luther King put the enormous moral authority of the Civil Rights Movement behind the demand to end the war. Still, combat ground on and on.

Activism was going in dozens of directions-draft refusal, electoral campaigns, veterans' protests, sit-ins, street militancy, hunger strikes, door-to-door organizing and more. The public mood was shifting, and large constituencies that had not previously felt comfortable taking part in public protests were getting impatient. The so-called "silent majority" was shifting gears and ready for the right vehicle to weigh in loudly and publicly against the war.

That June, the Vietnam Moratorium Committee stepped forward. The organizers had roots in the student movement and the out-of-the-blue 1968 Democratic primary campaign of Senator Eugene McCarthy, which had forced LBJ to step aside. Their idea was to set a date -- Wednesday, October 15, 1969 -- when there would be a moratorium on business as usual "in order that students, faculty members and concerned citizens can devote time and energy to the important work of taking the issue of peace in Vietnam to the larger community." The projection was that each succeeding month an additional day would be added to the moratorium and this would continue "until there is an American withdrawal or a negotiated settlement."

Hundreds of college student body presidents and school newspaper editors signed the student call supporting the Moratorium.

At a national antiwar conference July, one of the organizers explained the project. The conference voted to make October 15 part of the fall antiwar calendar, although some expressed reservations that the proposal was too dispersed and unfocused, as well as unrealistically ambitious.

As it turned out, October 15 was a staggering success. Millions of people participated in rallies, demonstrations, school walkouts, teach-ins, concerts and other events in cities and states across the country. Life magazine's October 24 issue said, "It was a display without historical parallel, the largest expression of pubic dissent ever seen in this country."

Hundreds of thousands took part in rallies all across New York City, 100,000 in Boston, 75,000 in Cleveland, 50,000 in Washington D.C., 25,000 in Ann Arbor, 25,000 in Madison, 20,000 in Minneapolis, 20,000 in Philadelphia, 20,000 in Detroit, 11,000 in Austin, and 5,000 in Salt Lake City.

Exhausted, the organizers merged the November Moratorium, set to expand to  two days, into a massive, but traditional, March on Washington. The Committee then abandoned the idea of adding a day to the Moratorium each month, but much of the momentum had been lost.  Its last gasp was a call for decentralized activities on the April 15, 1970 tax deadline date to highlight the cost of the war to the American people. Tens of thousands of people in a number of U.S. cities did participate in these April 15 actions, but the turnout was only a small fraction of the number who had shaken the country on October 15.

On April 19, 1970 the Vietnam Moratorium Committee announced its dissolution, with one of its leaders declaring that mass demonstrations were "a political fad that has worn off." (Bad call. Less than two weeks later, the massive campus eruption sparked by Nixon's invasion of Cambodia and fueled by the killings of students at Kent State and Jackson State ripped the country apart.)

Jerry Gordon, today a trade unionist and a leader in US Labor Against the War, recalls:

In its early stage, the Vietnam Moratorium received enormous publicity, as well as the endorsement of large numbers of politicians, who viewed it as a more acceptable alternative to actions called by the existing antiwar movement. There is no question but that the Moratorium succeeded in involving huge numbers of people who opposed the war but had not previously participated in antiwar demonstrations.

To cite one example: By 1969, we had been laboring for years to build the antiwar movement in Cleveland, calling one demonstration after another. While we kept involving more and more people, we had not mobilized more than 2,000 at any one time. Then along came the Moratorium, led by Cleveland-area people who had not been active in the local antiwar movement. The action they called drew 75,000 people!

Originally posted to lao hong han on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 03:25 PM PDT.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Were you there? (19+ / 0-)

    What lessons from the 1969 Moratorium would you hope influence the planning and organizing of the first Iraq Moratorium this fall?

    •  Discipline and focus are key (5+ / 0-)

      otherwise it is just a bunch of nostalgia freaks.  We need to demonstrate this is not your father's moratorium.

    •  I was at one of the Washington (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wu ming, blueyedace2, lao hong han

      Moritorium demonstrations.  I think it might have been the second one.  I recall going to one in Boston too--so I'm not sure.  The one I went to in DC was the time Nixon claimed he was watching football and didn't notice us.  It was an amazing day.

      I think the big problem now for these actions is that the press ignores them.  They got noticed back then.  There where amazing front page photos of the huge mass of humanity.

      After the bombing of Cabodia, we had a couple of really violent riots in Harvard Square with a lot of property damage.  I was there for both of those.  The police were grabbing people randomly and beating them.  It was pretty sad--the violence on both sides.

      What I worry about now is that the Feds might choose to use some of the new weapons that cause excruciating pain or that people might be killed by "non-lethal" bullets, as one young woman was here in Boston after a Red Sox championship game.

      "The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt." -- Bertrand Russell

      by Boston Boomer on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 04:14:15 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Media Coverage (5+ / 0-)

        While the big anti-war demos apparently got more coverage in the 60s than today, there is also I think a tendency to view that coverage nostalgically through rose-tinted glasses. Plenty of demos went unreported and the reporting itself was frequently hostile. It was just as neccesary then for people to build up a whole network of underground newspapers just as today we rely on the blogoshere. The mass media has ALWAYS been concentrated in the hands of our enemies and we've still been able to organize resistance. In any event demonstrations should not be judged simply on the amount of media coverage they generate. They can have transformative effects on the participants that can shift the balance of power around a question even when the media tries to ignore or downplay them (as we know they will).

        "Tell no lies. Claim no easy victories" -- Amilcar Cabral

        by Christopher Day on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 04:45:01 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  A point on the MSM (6+ / 0-)

          One goal of the Iraq Moartorium is indeed to punch through the media whiteout of anti-war activism. Though we all know it's there, even I have been a little suprised at noncoverage of the arrests, by now, of over 200 people for occupying Congresscritters' offices, most of them Dems, demanding a vote to defund the war. Local papers report the local events, but none of the big networks or "national" newspapers have done overview stories on such an important developemnt.

          By focusing all of the activities which normally go unreported on a single day, we will make them much harder to ignore, especially if some of the imaginative tactics being tossed back back and forth here are taken up

      •  I was at the rally in DC too (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Boston Boomer, lao hong han

        When Tricky Dick said he was watching football.

        I remember a sign "Nixon, Pull Out Like Your Father Should Have."

        The May 1970 violence at the University of Maryland sickened me.  The violence was on both sides, but the "cops" were worse, and actually the "cops" were rednecks from the Prince Georges County sheriff's posse.  I was gassed because the posse attacked our dorm in a police riot, after the cops had chased the violent demonstrators back from Route 1.  Our dorm was under seige until we were rescued by the Maryland State Police.  It never occurred to these clowns that we were in our dorm because we were trying to stay clear of the riot.

        "Great men do not commit murder. Great nations do not start wars." William Jennings Bryan

        by Navy Vet Terp on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 05:39:17 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I was 5 years old in Minneapolis (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lao hong han

      and IIRC there was a march from the University to the Federal Building downtown. I rode on my dad's shoulders. I remember lots of signs with rainbows on them and that Robert Bly spoke. It was a wonderful brisk fall day. The next spring my parents came home from the University having been teargassed. Both these events shaped me as a person, conveying the joyfull comraderie of the people in the streets as well as the venality of the powers that be.

      Lessons? Nothing more than that the people have the power to stop the war but need to get into the streets if it is to happen.

      "Tell no lies. Claim no easy victories" -- Amilcar Cabral

      by Christopher Day on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 04:24:00 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I was in 9th grade. (10+ / 0-)

    We cut classes in the afternoon and went to a nearby college to a demonstration.  

    I think candleight vigils in the evening to mourn the dead is quite effective, if we can get real numbers out to stand holding a candle in silence.  

    Real numbers is the key.

    "We've got to save America from this President." John Edwards 4/3/07

    by TomP on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 03:35:22 PM PDT

    •  The base in the student movement (7+ / 0-)

      isn't as strong as it was in '69, though I personally expect things to heat up considerably this fall. Casual and, in the last six months, purposive conversations   have turned up a good number of memories like yours--the high school kids ditch class and head toward the local college campus to connect up with something going on there.

      •  actually it wasn't that strong in 69 (7+ / 0-)

        at the height of the anti-war movement no more than 15% of students had ever done anything ... that includes attending a rally.

        •  Actually, thats quite a lot. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          lao hong han, TomP

          The campuses are bubbling, particularly with the re-birth of SDS, but absent a draft it will be difficult to achieve the same levels as occurred at the height of Viet Nam. Still I think the image of the apathetic student will soon be buried.

          "Tell no lies. Claim no easy victories" -- Amilcar Cabral

          by Christopher Day on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 04:31:16 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  This time there's no immediate threat... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            lao hong han

            ...of a draft. In the late 60's, conscience was augmented by self-interest/survival as a motivating factor.

            I get the impression that this time the antiwar sentiment is percolating up more from the general population's getting hip to this dire madness, rather than from any youth/student movement.

            There's still a very rational and potent contribution made to the 21st century antiwar movement by youth/students, but the ignition seems more generalized.

            There will be no accurate accounting of the continuing and onerous debilitation visited by the Bush/Republicans upon American lives and society   for a decade or more. The anxiety over this realization is growing, and may account for this generalized ignition.

            I'm the plowman in the valley - with my face full of mud

            by labradog on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 05:08:25 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I think labradog is right on both (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              ActivistGuy

              the effect of the draft then and the more gradual dawning on folks, today, of the awful price still to paid if the war ended tomorrow.

              I know that watching over the last six years while possible futures close off for young people in this country as US society, the US economy and US government are degraded has been a very sobering experience

              •  One thing we should try to make clear in linking (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                lao hong han

                the issues:  the sheer horrific cost of the war, just in terms of money thrown away and the costs still to be incurred in treating the wounded hampers our efforts to achieve universal health care, fund higher education via grants and subsidies to the universities; the egregious behavior of the oil companies both here and in Iraq; and the detrimental effects of our dependence on oil now showing up in climate change and threatened sea-level rise globally.  

                Students know people who are in the military in Iraq, but they are also painfully aware of these other serious issues.  If we can make it perfectly plain to students that the money being wasted in Iraq is for the benefit of those who are literally robbing our national budget and our environment blind, and that they are going to be paying the full price plus interest, they'll put down their books for a day and come out to stop the war.

                "Fighting Fascism is Always Cool." -- Amsterdam Weekly, volume three, issue 18

                by Noor B on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 07:07:33 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

            •  Which is why decentralized and local (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              wu ming, lao hong han, TomP, fayeforcure

              is very much the way to go.  When the antiwar movement was student driven (and in an era of extremely cheap gas) the big single "peace crawls" could bring in the energy of hundreds of thousands of young people from around the contry.  Today's peace movement is different, in just the way you describe, entirely emerging from common sense everywhere there's a person that takes time to look at the propaganda.  We need to engage those people where they are, that don't have the time and money to trek across the contry, to make their statements where they are, to bring the war and opposition to the war right into daily life.  Again, that connects with another point you made well, it was the draft that drove Nam into daily life, with Iraq it will take organization  and mobilization of the vast but diffuse awareness to bring it home.

          •  I was Columbia before and during the riots (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ActivistGuy, lao hong han, TomP

            The spring fling with the Grateful Dead had a MUCH bigger turn out than the protests for the Chicago Seven (eight if you count Bobby Seale).

            In '68 the Dead weren't anywhere near as big as they later became.  Hell... I was able to wander up onto the stage next to them and stand in front of the Speakers... you couldn't hear anything...all you could do was feel the WOOOOOMPH of air pound you.  I'm amazed I didn't go deaf.

        •  I'm tickled to have BN in the house... (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          wu ming, ActivistGuy, TomP, fayeforcure

          And to prove it I'm gonna start by questioning his numbers.

          If he's willing to stipulate that the May 1970 upsurge was the height of the anti-war movement on campus, I cite the 1971 Carnegie Commission on Higher Education study "May 1970: The Campus Aftermath of Cambodia and Kent State."(Can't lay hands on my original at the moment, but Kirkpatrick Sales' SDS uses it as a source.)

          From May 5 to May 8, over 350 campuses on strike, 536 shut down completely, many until the next fall.

          More than half the colleges and universities in the country (1350) were ultimately touched by protest demonstrations, involving nearly 60% of the student population--some 4,350,000 people in every kind of institution and every State of the Union.

          Now the wording is a bit tricksy, but it does suggest figure significantly than 15%. Further, even if that were the high water mark, as far as the strength of the base of the student movement, we definitely made a dent in the American body politic in May '70.

    •  Also, the candlelight thing (10+ / 0-)

      can sometimes be very effective. As I diaried a while ago, I recall the Vietnam Moratorium as being the candlelight demo which our SDS chapter took part in with candles made from three foot lengths of 2 x 2, wire-wrapped at the top in kerosene-soaked mattress fabric.

      Sounds insurrectionary (and it looked great), but it was drawn from the fine old US political and labor union tradition of torchlight parades.

    •  I was forcefully reminded of the incursion into (9+ / 0-)

      Cambodia this morning listening to the idiot lieberman.  That might get the anti-war feet on the ground in a real way.  The biggest difference I can see between now and 69 is the terrible financial quandry that young kids are in.  It was pretty easy to get some people together and finance a place to live and make it on the periphery pretty easy, not so much now.  Add to the mix the lack of returning pissed off vets telling all and sundry what a farce the wawr is and you have the current apparent apathy, I'm not sure that it is real apathy, but compared to what I remember from 68-72 it is pretty damn quiet.

      "I said, 'wait a minute, Chester, you know I'm a peaceful man.'" Robbie Robertson -8.13, -4.56

      by NearlyNormal on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 03:55:30 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You're so right about the financial (5+ / 0-)

        issues.  In the late '60s, I lived on a pittance quite happily.  After '73, I realized how lucky I had been.

        But the big difference in those days was the draft.  We all were either at risk or cared for someone at risk.

        "The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt." -- Bertrand Russell

        by Boston Boomer on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 04:18:49 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Conditions ARE different (4+ / 0-)

          but there have been massive student upsurges since the 60s (the divestment from South Africa movement in the mid-80s and the anti-sweatshop movement in the late 90s are just two). The campuses have been slow to move on the war, but we shouldn't act like they CAN'T.

          "Tell no lies. Claim no easy victories" -- Amilcar Cabral

          by Christopher Day on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 04:39:08 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I know they can, I hate to think its just the (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            lao hong han, TomP

            draft.

            "I said, 'wait a minute, Chester, you know I'm a peaceful man.'" Robbie Robertson -8.13, -4.56

            by NearlyNormal on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 05:32:30 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  the marches in 2002 and 2003 (3+ / 0-)

            were as big as most marches in vietnam. people showed up, saw it didn't even convince democrats to vote against the damn thing, and diverted energy elsewhere, for good or ill.

            surf putah, your friendly neighborhood central valley samizdat

            by wu ming on Mon Jun 11, 2007 at 01:26:03 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  That's what worries me too (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              wu ming, NearlyNormal

              actions used to be effective, now nothing seems to budge the politicians.

              The 2002 and 2003 marches were huge, but went mostly unreported by the MSM.

              In that sense I've become disillusioned too,.......but I still feel it's my duty to stand up for what I believe, and to act on that believe.

              And maybe now that the general public has the realization that bowing to a Mr 28% is ludicrous, our actions will start to pay off.

              Edwards puts healthcare reform on the table in a very credible way and is tough enough to make HR 676,....the ultimate goal, achievable.

              by fayeforcure on Mon Jun 11, 2007 at 06:53:52 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  what i'm beginning to think (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                lao hong han, fayeforcure

                is that we have totally forgotten a key element of what enabled people like gandhi and MLK, jr. to be effective in forcing change. the well-mannered nonviolent marches are only threatening to the status quo if the establishment believes that refusing to deal with the peaceful ones will unleash something far more disruptive.

                it was the threat of malcolm x and urban riots that made the civil rights act and voting rights act a more palatable choice for the establishment. it was, i suspect, the fear of a country coming apart at the seams and a military on the verge of mutiny that led the politicians to deal with the antiwar protesters's demands. if we are assiduous about making it clear that we are peaceful, orderly, have our permit, and are not likely to do anything even the slightest bit disruptive, i suspect that we will continue to be ignored.

                the paradox, it seems to me, is that the sort of disruptive chaos that pushes politicians to the point where they'll change course also tends to scare the hell out of certain segments of the electorate, and pushes them towards law and order closet fascism. so how to balance those two threats to democracy? do we "suit up" and act orderly to get electoral political power without forcing the hands of the powers that be, or do we risk losing elections but stop the damn thing?

                it's a tricky thing.

                surf putah, your friendly neighborhood central valley samizdat

                by wu ming on Mon Jun 11, 2007 at 10:32:07 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

      •  The ironic difference (5+ / 0-)

        Nixon liked to talk about the "silent majority" that allegedly supported the war.  I suppose taht during the '68 campaign that was still true, though the impact of Tet was starting to set in.  Today the "silent majority", actually a silent supermajority, is ready to start bringing the troops home.  The key to making that possible is to find simple, local "entry-level" actions that can be coordinated all across the country that allow many many more of that silent majority to express their views, in a way that is visible and unifying, that shows the latent strength of the silent supermajority and starts to turn it into actual power.

      •  not apathy (3+ / 0-)

        so much as despair as to whether people can actually influence the government through electoral or protest means. there is no faith in people power anymore, from what i've seen.

        surf putah, your friendly neighborhood central valley samizdat

        by wu ming on Mon Jun 11, 2007 at 01:24:48 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  No faith in People Power (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          wu ming, NearlyNormal

          Yeah, that's it.

          I've seen ardent activists all but give up, out of major despair.

          After the 2004 elections we went through a collective period of severe depression, and many of us have only been able to shake that recently because 2006 surprised us.

          I still think 2006 was a fluke and due mostly to a miscalculation on the Republican side in their election rigging plans.

          Some of the people power will be restored with verifyable voting though. And that trust in our election system, will get more people to feel their actions will actually make a difference.

          Edwards puts healthcare reform on the table in a very credible way and is tough enough to make HR 676,....the ultimate goal, achievable.

          by fayeforcure on Mon Jun 11, 2007 at 07:02:07 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  First we have to influence the media (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          fayeforcure

          to give it proper coverage, then the government will get influenced.

          "I said, 'wait a minute, Chester, you know I'm a peaceful man.'" Robbie Robertson -8.13, -4.56

          by NearlyNormal on Mon Jun 11, 2007 at 07:09:46 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Media only seems interested in sensationalism (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            lao hong han, NearlyNormal

            Peaceful stuff doesn't seem to interest them much.

            wu ming has made some interesting comments about why the 2002 and 2003 marches got very little attention:

            if we are assiduous about making it clear that we are peaceful, orderly, have our permit, and are not likely to do anything even the slightest bit disruptive, i suspect that we will continue to be ignored.

            the paradox, it seems to me, is that the sort of disruptive chaos that pushes politicians to the point where they'll change course also tends to scare the hell out of certain segments of the electorate, and pushes them towards law and order closet fascism. so how to balance those two threats to democracy? do we "suit up" and act orderly to get electoral political power without forcing the hands of the powers that be, or do we risk losing elections but stop the damn thing?

            Edwards puts healthcare reform on the table in a very credible way and is tough enough to make HR 676,....the ultimate goal, achievable.

            by fayeforcure on Mon Jun 11, 2007 at 11:25:04 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  I'm hoping for this part to happen again: (7+ / 0-)

    "as well as the endorsement of large numbers of politicians."

  •  I was at both. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lao hong han

    The biggest crowd I've ever seen.  The war went on for 4 more years. I'm not sure mass demonstrations are that effective.

  •   The timing was very important (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ActivistGuy, lao hong han

    The peace march before had started a movement, but Nixons secret plan to end the war was found out to be a phony and the anger was building. It cam at the right time and the right place, and praise be to all those who had marched and written before because they laid the groundwork. Kent State had already happen and that also fired up people that before had sat quietly by. Now is the time for this March and the next if need be will come in it's time also.

    -8.63 -7.28 "Congress _ a group of men who individually can do nothing, but as a group decide that nothing can be done."

    by OneCrankyDom on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 05:17:05 PM PDT

  •  I was in high school. (3+ / 0-)

    My whole experience of group energy, up to that time, was at sporting events. A crowd of people all shouting for victory and conquering and domination.

    At the DC Moratorium, it was my first experience with such massive unification of everyone's heads, but for a non-violent, beneficent goal. Being in a crowd of thousands all focusing our energy like that, that was an impressive thing to this kid.

    (Speaking of a crowd full of focused energy, a few months later was my first Rolling Stones concert. But that's another story.)

    It was, and is, great to look into the faces of your antiwar compatriots, all ages, all sizes, styles, and colors, and see America.

    I'm the plowman in the valley - with my face full of mud

    by labradog on Sun Jun 10, 2007 at 05:25:26 PM PDT

  •  What I'm looking forward to (4+ / 0-)

    are the people going to work on S21 wearing their black ribbons that will have their jaws drop when they see who else at work is wearing a black ribbon; for the teach-ins at campuses across the country that can finally bring some focus to student activism; to actions that get Moratorium day actions and events into hundreds of local newspapers and local tv news, even if the national MSM blacks it out.

  •  i'm not on the east coast (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lao hong han, fayeforcure

    but i have thought for some time that an unannounced go-to-your-congressman-or-senator's-office priotest, where hundreds of thousands of citizens just show up unannounced, sans signs or banners, and ask to speak with their reps about the war, and refuse to disperse until they've been talked to, could make a big impression, and would certainly be unexpected.

    ultimately, i think it'll require general strikes and threats of mutiny before this crowd budges on the war, though.

    surf putah, your friendly neighborhood central valley samizdat

    by wu ming on Mon Jun 11, 2007 at 01:29:40 AM PDT

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