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Exit polls show Senator Barack Obama having substantial support from American Jewish voters. But questions continue to be asked about how he relates to issues of concern to the Jewish community, especially the security of Israel. Some questioning no doubt stems from his limited national record. But it also surely reflects a campaign to define him as "anti-Israel" by some political adversaries and opponents of a "two states for two peoples" peace settlement between Israelis and Palestinians.

This diary attempts to show, based on Senator Obama's own words and polling data about American Jewish opinion, that,

a President Obama would be a true friend of Israel because he recognizes its need for lasting security and that, a necessary component of Israeli security is a peace settlement with the Palestinians based on two states for two peoples; and

Barack Obama's views coincide with the mainstream of American Jewish public opinion.

Senator Obama in his own words

Last Sunday morning, "Senator Obama of Illinois met with about 100 members of Cleveland's Jewish Community at the Landerhaven function hall in Cleveland." His campaign provided "a partial transcript of the session," which the New York Sun published. They are not the words of a naif, or of someone ill-informed about the complexities of the region. They are the words of someone with

- an evident love of Israel,

- a firm devotion to her security, and

- a wise recognition that lasting security for Israel can be based only on a peace settlement with the Palestinians that enables the Palestinians to enjoy their own national self-determination in a viable state of their own alongside Israel.

Here are some excerpts:

Well here's my starting orientation is A - Israel's security is sacrosanct, is non negotiable. That's point number one. Point number two is that the status quo I believe is unsustainable over time. So we're going to have to make a shift from the current deadlock that we're in. Number three that Israel has to remain a Jewish state and what I believe that means is that any negotiated peace between the Israelis and the Palestinians is going to have to involve the Palestinians relinquishing the right of return as it has been understood in the past. And that doesn't mean that there may not be conversations about compensation issues. It also means the Israelis will have to figure out how do we work with a legitimate Palestinian government to create a Palestinian state that is sustainable. It's going to have to be contiguous, its going to have to work its going to have to function in some way. That's in Israel's interest by the way. If you have a balkanized unsustainable state, it will break down and we will be back in the same boat. So those are the starting points of my orientation.

My goal then would be to solicit as many practical opinions as possible in terms of how we're going to move forward on a improvement of relations and a sustainable peace. The question that I will be asking any advisor is how does it achieve the goal of Israel's security and how does it achieve the goal of sustainability over the long term and I want practical, hardheaded, unromantic advice about how we're going to achieve that.

Something that [Cong.] Robert [Wexler] said that I think is very important. I have consistently said this, and I have said this to Palestinians, I said this when I was in Ramallah, that you cannot fault Israel for being concerned about any peace agreement if the Palestinian state or Palestinian authority or Palestinian leadership does not seem to be able to follow through on its commitments. And I think the approach we have to take with respect to negations is that you sit down and talk, but you have to suspend trust until you can see that the Palestinian side can follow through and that's a position that I have consistently taken and the one I will take with me to the White House.

Senator Obama also was audacious enough -- some might say foolhardy, I would say brave enough -- to acknowledge his differences with some hardest-line elements within the American Jewish community:

This is where I get to be honest and I hope I'm not out of school here. I think there is a strain within the pro-Israel community that says unless you adopt a unwavering pro-Likud approach to Israel that you're anti-Israel and that can't be the measure of our friendship with Israel. If we cannot have a honest dialogue about how do we achieve these goals, then we're not going to make progress. And frankly some of the commentary that I've seen which suggests guilt by association or the notion that unless we are never ever going to ask any difficult questions about how we move peace forward or secure Israel that is non military or non belligerent or doesn't talk about just crushing the opposition that that somehow is being soft or anti-Israel, I think we're going to have problems moving forward. And that I think is something we have to have an honest dialogue about.

I also expect to work on behalf of peace with the full knowledge that Israel still has bitter enemies who are intent on its destruction. . . . Threats of Israel's destruction can not be dismissed as rhetoric. The threat from Iran is real and my goal as president would be to eliminate that threat. Ending the war in Iraq I believe will be an important first step in achieving that goal because it will increase our flexibility and credibility when we deal with Iran. My approach to Iran will be aggressive diplomacy. . . . The time I believe has come to talk to directly to the Iranians and to lay out our clear terms. Their end of pursuit of nuclear weapons, an end of their support of terrorism and an end of their threat to Israel and other countries in the reason.


Attacks on Senator Obama through his advisors

Some people have tried to attack Senator Obama by questioning his advisors' support for Israel, particularly Zbigniew Brzezinski, National Security Advisor to President Carter. But in his Cleveland remarks, Senator Obama set the record straight.

There is a spectrum of views in terms of how the US and Israel should be interacting. It has evolved over time. It means that somebody like Brzezinski who, when he was national security advisor would be considered not outside of the mainstream in terms of his perspective on these issues, is now considered by many in the Jewish Community anathema. I know Brzezinski he's not one of my key advisors. I've had lunch with him once, I've exchanged emails with him maybe 3 times. He came to Iowa to introduce for a speech on Iraq. He and I agree that Iraq was an enormous strategic blunder and that input from him has been useful in assessing Iraq, as well as Pakistan, where actually, traditionally, if you will recall he was considered a hawk. The liberal wing of the Democratic Party was very suspicious of Brzezinski precisely because he was so tough on many of these issues. I do not share his views with respect to Israel. I have said so clearly and unequivocally. The others that you refer to are former members of the Clinton administration. Somebody like a Tony Lake [a 2005 convert to Judaism], the former National Security Adviser [to President Bill Clinton], or Susan Rice - these are not anti-Israel individuals. These are people who strongly believe in Israel's right to exist. Strongly believe in a two state solution. Strongly believe that the Palestinians have been irresponsible and have been strongly critical of them. Share my view that Israel has to remain a Jewish state, that the US has a special relationship with the Jewish state. There's no inkling that there has been anything in anything that they've written that would suggest they're not stalwart friends of Israel.

[O]ne of the things that struck me when I went to Israel was how much more open the debate was around these issues in Israel than they are sometimes here in the United States. It's very ironic. I sat down with the head of Israeli security forces and his view of the Palestinians was incredibly nuanced because he's dealing with these people every day. There's good and there's bad, and he was willing to say sometimes we make mistakes and we made this miscalculation and if we are just pressing down on these folks constantly without giving them some prospects for hope, that's not good for our security situation. There was a very honest, thoughtful debate taking place inside Israel. All of you, I'm sure, have experienced this when you travel there. Understandably, because of the pressure that Israel is under, I think the U.S. pro-Israel community is sometimes a little more protective or concerned about opening up that conversation. But all I'm saying though is that actually ultimately should be our goal, to have that same clear eyed view about how we approach these issues.


Senator Obama and the American Jewish mainstream

Last May, Zogby conducted a survey of American Jewish and American Arab opinion for Americans for Peace Now and the Arab American Insitute. Here is some of results:

* 98% of Jewish Americans agree that "Israelis have a right to live in a secure and independent state of their own." (Table 9); 90% of Jewish Americans agree that "Palestinians have a right to live in a secure and independent state of their own." (Table 10)

* 68% of Jewish Americans would be more likely likely to support a presidential candidate who promised to take an active role in the peace process between Israel and the Palestinians. (Table 7).

* 87% of Jewish Americans support a negotiated peace agreement between Israelis and Palestinians that included the establishment of an independent, secure Palestinian state alongside an independent, secure Israeli state, and resolved final status issues of Jerusalem, refugees, and borders. (Table 14).

* 89% of Jewish Americans think it important for Arab Americans and Jewish Americans to work together to achieve a Middle East peace where Palestinians and Israelis each have the right to live in an independent state of their own. (Table 13).

* 65% of Jewish Americans agree that it is to the interests of both Israelis and Palestinians to end the occupation. (Table 15).

The Zogby survey also provided some interesting data about the general political outlook of American Jews:

* Democrat:             66% of Jewish Americans

* Republican:           16% of Jewish Americans

* Independent:        15% of Jewish Americans

* Progressive:           19% of Jewish Americans

* Liberal:                   34% of Jewish Americans

* Moderate:               27% of Jewish Americans

* Conservative:          16% of Jewish Americans

* Very Conservative:    2% of Jewish Americans

* Libertarian:                3% of Jewish Americans



Diarist's tags: Barack Obama, American Jews, Israel, Palestine, Americans for Peace Now, Anthony Lake, Susan Rice



Originally posted to another American on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 07:20 AM PST.

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Comment Preferences

    •  You get a top and a reco from me today. (4+ / 0-)

      Your diary caught my attention because I was not certain about Obama's views on Israel, other than the media-reported engagement he's had with AIPAC.  I'll be honest - I'm not a fan of AIPAC at all; in fact I think their lobbying efforts have clouded some of the real issues involved in Israeli-Palestinian relations.  So I came into the diary with serious questions about how Obama would handle the situation.

      Thankfully, your quotes have provided some much needed clarity into how he would look at the situation, specifically these passages:

      Bold sections by diarist, Italicized sections reflect my emphasis

      This is where I get to be honest and I hope I'm not out of school here. I think there is a strain within the pro-Israel community that says unless you adopt a unwavering pro-Likud approach to Israel that you're anti-Israel and that can't be the measure of our friendship with Israel. If we cannot have a honest dialogue about how do we achieve these goals, then we're not going to make progress. And frankly some of the commentary that I've seen which suggests guilt by association or the notion that unless we are never ever going to ask any difficult questions about how we move peace forward or secure Israel that is non military or non belligerent or doesn't talk about just crushing the opposition that that somehow is being soft or anti-Israel, I think we're going to have problems moving forward. And that I think is something we have to have an honest dialogue about.

      ...

      [O]ne of the things that struck me when I went to Israel was how much more open the debate was around these issues in Israel than they are sometimes here in the United States. It's very ironic. I sat down with the head of Israeli security forces and his view of the Palestinians was incredibly nuanced because he's dealing with these people every day. There's good and there's bad, and he was willing to say sometimes we make mistakes and we made this miscalculation and if we are just pressing down on these folks constantly without giving them some prospects for hope, that's not good for our security situation. There was a very honest, thoughtful debate taking place inside Israel. All of you, I'm sure, have experienced this when you travel there. Understandably, because of the pressure that Israel is under, I think the U.S. pro-Israel community is sometimes a little more protective or concerned about opening up that conversation. But all I'm saying though is that actually ultimately should be our goal, to have that same clear eyed view about how we approach these issues.

      This seems to me like very clear, mature and forward-looking policy of the kind that elected officials in the United States have not expressed publically in a long time.  Sure we have to help Israel and offer them protection if they request it, but we should not take sides against the Palestinians if we are trying to create a solution that includes them as an equal partner and we should call Israel out when they do something destructive to the process.

    •  Obama's point of view is exactly the view of (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      another American, wxlr

      ...nearly all those who tend to support israel in the contentious I/P debates here at dKos.  

      This is a left of center, Democratic viewpoint, and I thank you for presenting it unambiguously.

      we sad, despondent keys
      sorrowing cut and paste
      have written in anguish
      these words you've heard
      - after Guido Cavalcanti

      by Eric S on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 11:24:48 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  heck of an extensive diary (5+ / 0-)

    very informative.  I like the image at the bottom.  well done!!

  •  I'd like to see Obama (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    maddercow, MaskedKat, Happy Days

    Do something rather dramatic to reach out to Jewish voters and overwhelmingly reassure them of any fears they may have.  

    Vice President Feingold has been thrown about; but a notion I like is to appoint via a shadow cabinet Mayor Michael Bloomberg as domestic policy czar. Bloomberg attracts moderates, Jewish voters, and independents.

    Of course despite all the worries, Obama still won the Jewish vote in California, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Illinois.

    The Book of Revelation is not a foreign policy manual.

    by Dont Just Stand There on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 07:28:50 AM PST

    •  The only reassurance most American Jews need (7+ / 0-)

      is greater exposure to Senator Obama. The rest wouldn't vote for any Democratic candidate.

      •  Marty Peretz says you're right (0+ / 0-)

        But a number of his commentors say you're off. Of course these posters might all be folks who would vote GOP anyway, just as you indicated above.

        http://blogs.tnr.com/...

        The Book of Revelation is not a foreign policy manual.

        by Dont Just Stand There on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 08:10:30 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  I can't speak for the lunatic fringe (0+ / 0-)

        but the members of our congregation and other Jews I know are far more concerned about what's happening in the United States and which candidate can fix the train wreck Bush & Co. are leaving than they are about Israel.

        There's a loud, hardline, vocal minority who vote in US elections based on a candidate's perceived closeness with Israel - by which they mean the candidate aligns with the Likud (spit, spit) party in Israel.

        Unfortunately, they get the most attention because they're willing to shout down dissenting voices - even within their own Jewish community.

        But I don't think Obama or any Democratic candidate has to worry about capturing the Jewish vote this year!

        Yes. There ARE progressive Democrats in Alabama. Visit with us at Left in Alabama

        by countrycat on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 08:19:47 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  One important thing stood out to me (8+ / 0-)

    Obama calling out

    a strain within the pro-Israel community that says unless you adopt a unwavering pro-Likud approach to Israel that you're anti-Israel and that can't be the measure of our friendship with Israel.

    That's awfully refreshing to hear for me. I think that the pro-Likud strain in America has overwhelmed the pro-Israel movement, despite being (I believe) the minority opinion in American Judaism, and that turns people off from having an open discussion about the issues.

    That's a ballsy statement for Obama to make. Good for him.

    I don't have your money here! It's...at Bill's house and...Fred's house!

    by StuckBetweenStations on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 07:30:24 AM PST

  •  Thanks for this. (4+ / 0-)

    Once again Obama is displaying a great understanding of the situation.  

  •  Good stuff. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    countrycat, Treg, MaskedKat

    So 65% of Jewish Americans want to end the occupation. This is not only a mainstream view, that makes this a majority view, by a wide margin, among the Jewish community. Why are candidates not talking explicitly about ending the occupation (and the reasons for doing so) on TV, in debates, etc.?

    Whenever we dumb down the political debate, we lose. -Barack Obama

    by klizard on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 07:32:38 AM PST

  •  from my rabbi (11+ / 0-)

    Over the past few days we all have been besieged with political advertisements, computer generated telephone calls and e-mails urging us to support specific political candidates. We are in the midst of a presidential campaign that, by any measure is historic. As it stands today, the Democratic candidate for President will either be a White woman or an African American man. The Republican candidate could possibly be a member of the Mormon Church. All politics and positions aside, this is quite remarkable. Our nation has come quite a long way from the racism and narrow mindedness of earlier generations.

    And yet, unfortunately, the words "all politics aside" are laughable in the current political climate. While there are reasons to be optimistic, the tactics of hate-speech, ad-hominem attacks, and rumor mongering are very much alive and well in our world today. Among the many communications that I have recently received are insidious assaults on specific candidates that imply that they are "anti-Israel" and that their election could spell disaster for the Jewish people. Many congregants and friends have forwarded similar e-mails to me as well. These types of scare tactics are unacceptable and, quite frankly unworthy of our political system.

    Let there be no doubt whatsoever - I am a Zionist. I strongly believe that the State of Israel must remain strong, Jewish and Democratic. I also look forward to the day when the Palestinian people will find the leadership and the will to reject violence and enter into a peace process that will result in the establishment of a Palestinian State. Having said this, my unwavering love and support of Israel is but one of many concerns that I have as an American Jew. Jews are not a "one-issue" community. I believe that along with support of the State of Israel, my Jewish values force me to be concerned about the rights of the downtrodden to education, housing, employment and health-care. I see the war in Iraq draining our country's financial, emotional and spiritual reserves. I see our economic future in danger. I worry about my children's ability to access the opportunities for success that I have enjoyed over the years. These are the issues that will impact the decision that I will make.

    The idea that Jewish votes can be "bought" or manipulated through fear tactics is long-gone. All of the major Presidential candidates - Democrat and Republican - have been unequivocal in their support of the State of Israel. So when you vote, do so not out of fear, but of hope. Reject personal attacks and, in doing so, force the candidates and the special interest groups to engage in meaningful dialogue.

    B’shalom,
    Rabbi Joseph R. Black

    (emphasis mine)

    Wise words from a wise man. Don't ever forget that American Jews are Americans, and whatever we think about Israel, our concerns start at home.

  •  Excellent diary! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    another American, MaskedKat

    Do you happen to know anywhere where I can find any stats relating to the extent of Jewish support for Obama?  I have the impression that he is still behind Clinton but I don't think it is based on anything other than anecdotal evidence, and an Obama supporting Jewish friend and I were discussing this the other day.  Do you think that Obama is catching up in terms of Jewish support?

  •  Obama and Clinton (3+ / 0-)

    are a wash when it comes to issues of special concern to Jewish-Americans, such as the security of Israel. They would both be orders of magnitude better than a Bush-McCain 3rd term would be on these issues. If Obama gets the nomination, I don't think he'll have any problem garnering the vast majjority of the Jewish vote as Democratic candidates usually do. The Republicans will peddle a lot of crap in places with large Jewish communities, like New York and Florida, but I don't think few Jewish voters will be buying.

    •  Oy, that would be one "j" in majority. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MaskedKat

      Time for more coffee.

    •  But some are trying hard to portray Obama as (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Treg

      anti-Israel.

      I was listening to Stephanie Miller on Air America this morning and a caller was absolutely rabid anti-Obama, railing against Stephanie for supporting him, and in the end it boiled down to her perception that he was anti-Israel.  She cited Ralph Nader's statement that Obama used to speak out about the plight of the Palestinians.

      This is also complicated by Obama's African and Indonesian roots, having had Muslims as relatives.  Personally, I think that gives him extra dimensions of insight and understanding, but  it is the type of thing that is too easily distorted and misrepresented to the general public.

      Dealing with the whole complex of Muslim-related "issues" is his biggest challenge. Even the so-called patriotism flap plays into this.

      I think the campaign has done pretty well so far, but the heavy duty attacks on this front have not even begun.  Facts are on his side, but we'll have to be vigilant in countering the coming barrage of direct and indirect attacks.

      Hope gives you the courage and energy to act!

      by Happy Days on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 08:08:36 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  People Speaking Out for the Truth (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    countrycat, arielle, another American

    There has been a lot of Loshan Hora (spreading of malicious, false gossip) about Obama among certain parts of the Jewish community.  Fortunately, many responsible Jewish leaders, including rabbis, have spoken out against it.

    This happened before in 2004 with respect to John Kerry and his wife Teresa Heinz Kerry, who was falsely accused of supporting Palestinian charities.  The difference was back then the defense of the Kerrys came from people in the ranks who did their homework and spoke out about the truth.  

    Kerry won more than 80 percent of the Jewish vote; about the same as Al Gore received in 2000.  Thus the Bush camp's effort to divide the Jewish community ultimately failed.

  •  Thanks for your diary (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    countrycat

    This is something I've had a concern about because a sane and enduring solution for Israelis and  Palestinians has been thwarted IMO by a very powerful lobbying group in this country, AIPAC, that purports to support Israel but is a right wing neocon Republican dominated group that sponsors military aggression and violence instead of real solutions. There's plenty to read here on DK about AIPAC, but from what I remember when I did some reading...at least in the last twenty years or so, AIPAC has/had  been controlled by 4 super rich, ultra right businessmen who made their money in home building, plumbing, etc and may have ties to military contracting and promote a neocon military agenda that promotes violence in the region.
    AIPAC has been very influential with some of our member of Congress who get huge donations and understand instinctively that they risk political defeat if they cross AIPAC.

  •  Again (0+ / 0-)

    As I pointed out in another diary on this topic yesterday, I didn't see a whole lot of balance here from Obama.  It seemed pretty standard for an American politician:  Israel is special...military and economic aid to Israel is sacrosanct...don't trust Palestinians...don't talk to Hamas...Iran is evil...all options on the table...Israel was right in Lebanon...I'm not a Muslim...etc.  

    About the only nod Obama gave to the Palestinians is that their state must be "contiguous."  So that suggests he won't support Israeli annexations so extreme that they break up the West Bank completely.  But anything else appears to fit within Obama's vision.

    Obama said we need to have a real conversation about peace in the Middle East.  I didn't really see him opening that conversation, though.

  •  How can a Jewish state be a democracy? (0+ / 0-)

    If it is a Jewish state it is a theocracy.  

  •  Nice work (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    another American, Shaviv

    One of my colleagues said her husband is threatening to vote Republican for the first time ever because he's heard that Obama is anti-Israel (I immediately forwarded some useful links, including some of the ones you cite).  So this sort of debunking is much-needed.

    Anyone who is wavering on whether to support our nominee in November should be tied to a chair and forced to watch the last Republican debate.

    by cardinal on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 08:14:19 AM PST

  •  I saw something about this in Newsweek, too (0+ / 0-)

    ...questions continue to be asked about how he relates to issues of concern to the Jewish community, especially the security of Israel.

    Questions asked by whom?

    It sounds like Sen. Obama is taking the standard (semi- or wholly unworkable) positions from the Democratic party's standard set. (For example, how can both Israeli and Palestinian territory be contiguous?)

    But other than that, look, no presidential candidate in this country is going to outright side with anyone against Israel. I like to believe that this is because Democratic politicians believe that both the USA and Israel benefit from alliance (Republicans... well, they have a lot of reasons, some of them tangled up in Christian millenialism, or racism, or American empire, or whatever).

    But an alliance does not mean one party gives the other a free pass to do whatever it likes. An alliance of nations should be like a friendship between individuals - you and your friends derive mutual benefit from your relationship because you trade favors, you offer emotional support to one another, and you advise one another too. If I'm dancing along the edge of a cliff, shouldn't my friends warn me? If they were previously supporting me in my dancing, shouldn't they at least say "Your dancing is putting you in danger, so the very least we can do is turn the music off and tell you to watch out"?

    I don't believe that Sen. Obama, if he becomes diplomat in chief, would actually say such things. I'm too much of a cynic. But he ought to, and I think the chances that he will are greater than the chances that Sen. Clinton, if she were elected, would do so. (Even though, by superficial appearances, she is more friendly to the Arab cause than Obama; witness the hug with Mrs. Arafat.)

    Oh, my friend, how have we come / to trade the fiddle for the drum?

    by Shaviv on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 08:27:46 AM PST

    •  Exactly (0+ / 0-)

      It's a shame that so many people are rushing out to explain that Obama's position is nothing new, but safely ensconced in the same platitudes that every other politician uses.  

      I see nothing so far to indicate that Obama is bringing anything new to the table on this subject

      •  Well, when I hear "the same platitudes", (0+ / 0-)

        my ears turn. I mean, our national inaction and silence with respect to the conflict between Israel and its neighbors is unfortunate, and some simple actions or speech would be nice, there's such a thing as too much action too. For an extreme example, invading either would be really, really a bad idea (one's nuclear-armed, the other would just be another Iraq).

        Hey, we could stop selling them defective cluster weapons, for example, and tell them that they'd only be allowed to buy the stuff that works if they adhere to a promise never to use them in inhabited areas.

        As an aside (and I've probably asked you this before, sorry): I met a guy named Weasel a couple years ago, he was short, had curly blond hair, had a tiny tiny black Labrador at the time. It was in New Orleans. You/not you?

        Oh, my friend, how have we come / to trade the fiddle for the drum?

        by Shaviv on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 11:52:59 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  i'm in total alignment with obama's statements. (0+ / 0-)

    Cynicism is a sorry form of wisdom. -Barack Obama

    by jj24 on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 08:46:50 AM PST

  •  Zbigniew and Hitler (0+ / 0-)

    A little know, indeed unknown fact about the lovely Brezinski family. My oldest friend's mother rented out
    a room to Zbig when he was a student at McGill in Montreal. She related to me years before her death that he had a picture of Adolph Hitler prominently displayed in his room. Now this is in no way an indictment of Barack, who I do not believe is anti-semitic, however
    people should know what a piece of shit Zbigniew Brezinski is and how his animus towards the Jewish people has deep roots in his Nazi collaborating family.
    Senator Obama dump this asshole!

  •  In the end, I don't think this will even matter (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    another American

    Name one Jew that would vote for McCain over Obama, that wouldn't have anyway.  If Menachem Begin himself were Obama's Middle East advisor, these same people would still vote for McCain.  They're Republicans after all.

    And, in the primaries, the only place it would have made a difference was New York, where Hillary was going to win anyway.

    BTW, this is pretty well done.

    "I remember every detail. The Germans wore gray. You wore blue."

    by dfb1968 on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 09:00:16 AM PST

    •  I actually know... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dfb1968

      ...a local Democratic elected official, who shall remain nameless, that indicated he would vote for McCain over Obama.  In part over the issue of Israel.

      I think that's a bad move.  But it does demonstrate some serious problems of perception that we face.

      •  Idiots will be idiots (0+ / 0-)

        Unfortunately, Hashem gave us all the absolute right to be idiots.  Some of us choose not to act on that ability.  

        If it helps him out, let him know that unlike the "likud" that Obama is referring to, I am a card carrying member of the actual Likud, and I happily voted for Obama.

        Back to the issue of electoral politics, can you see this affecting any states other than New York (which I think we would still win anyway), and Florida (which I could see us losing with or without the Israel issue)?

        "I remember every detail. The Germans wore gray. You wore blue."

        by dfb1968 on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 10:48:16 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks for a great "Obama on Israel" resource! (0+ / 0-)

    I think you've put together an excellent, hard-hitting but brief and easy to read position paper for anyone to use in refuting any suggestion that Obama might be "soft on Israel".

    We're all pretty strange one way or another; some of us just hide it better. "Normal" is a dryer setting.

    by david78209 on Tue Feb 26, 2008 at 08:10:17 PM PST

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