Skip to main content


(Click image to enlarge)

South Florida, long a Republican stronghold on the strength of its fiercely Republican Cuban American exile community, has also become the last GOP beachhead into the Latino community. It's three representatives in the region -- Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (FL-18), Lincoln Diaz-Balart (FL-21), and Mario Diaz-Balart (FL-25) are the only Latino federal office holders in the entire Republican Party. [Update: Oh, and Mel Martinez in the Senate. We'll take care of him in 2010.]

Of course, they've had the benefit of a fiercely partisan Republican community. While most Latino communities traditionally (pre-scapegoating of immigrants) swung a fair amount between parties, the Florida Cuban community never forgave Democrats for the Bay of Pigs and have given the GOP about 75 percent of their vote for decades.

Yet demographic (in-migration by Haitian and non-Cuban Latinos) and cultural changes (younger Cuban-Americans are more likely to be Democrats) have transformed the region, and those previously unbeatable Republicans face their first real test of survival in memory. The place just isn't as Republican anymore.

In 2006, the Democratic challengers won from 38 to 41 percent of the vote. Last fall, in part of District 18, a Cuban Democrat won an election for an open state legislative seat formerly held by a Cuban Republican. And in all three districts Republican voter registration numbers are down since 2006 while Democratic registration is up and independent registration is up even further. "Independents, I don't care what district you're in in this country, are leaning Democrat this year," says political consultant Jeffrey Garcia of Rindy Miller Media, who is working for two of this fall's three Democratic challengers.

Of course, these are also the three districts that have landed Florida Rep. and Red to Blue lead Debbie Wasserman Schultz in hot water with the netroots. The person at the DCCC in charge of switching Red districts wants to sit these races out because she's "friends" with the incumbent Republicans who have fought for perpetual war in Iraq, the abolition of SCHIP, cute puppies and apple pie (figuratively speaking, of course).

We, of course, aren't so myopic. We are endorsing Joe Garcia in Florida's 25th congressional district and have added him to our Blue Majority ActBlue fundraising page.

Most recently, Garcia was chair of the Miami-Dada Democratic Party and head of NDN's Hispanic Strategy Center. But most importantly on his resume, given his district, is that Garcia was a former executive director of the powerful Cuban American National Foundation, giving him credibility in segments of the Cuban community that might otherwise dismiss him outright for being a Democrat.

This is a Republican district, but not overwhelmingly so -- R+4. We have 29 Democrats representing more Republican districts. IL-14, were Democrat Bill Foster just won his dramatic special election a couple of weeks ago, is R+4.8. In 2006 against a no-name, no-money Democrat, Diaz-Balart managed an unimpressive 58 percent. In 2004 he was unopposed. In 2002, when he first won the seat, he got 65 percent in the open seat race without the advantages of incumbency. Clearly, his trajectory is headed in the wrong direction.

And younger Cuban Americans aren't as solidly Republican as their parents.

"The 'historic' exiles are passing away and not being replaced in the same weight," said Sergio Bendixen, a Miami pollster working on the Hillary Clinton campaign.

Less than half of Miami Dade County's Hispanic voters are registered Republicans (48 percent), down from 59 percent a decade ago, the Miami Herald reported last month. One Hispanic group which organizes voter registration drives, Democracia USA, reports that 45 percent of the 56,000 voters it registered last year chose no party affiliation [...]

Younger exiles show less interest in Cuba and are more engaged in national issues, he says. "They give Cuba almost no importance," he said. "For them it's education, health care, and Hispanic issues such as immigration."

On top of that, new arrivals from the island are less enthusiastic about isolating Cuba, in large part because they still have relatives there.

The number of Cuban-Americans in Miami-Dade County who support dialogue with the Cuban government has risen from 40 percent in 1991 to 65 percent, according to a poll by Florida International University.

In one recent poll conducted for the Democratic Party in two heavily Cuban-American congressional districts in Miami-Dade County, voters rated getting rid of Castro sixth among their concerns. Their top priority was getting out of Iraq.

There are a few races around the country that will help shape the post-election spin, the kind of races that can infuse Democrats with a genuine national mandate for change and make clear that Republicans are as discredited as we've always known they should be.

Those races include mostly strong challenges in traditionally Republican strongholds like the Alaska contests and Gary Trauner's challenge in WY-AL, as well as the extinction of Republican holdouts from entire regions, like the few Republican holdouts in New York, Connecticut, and the top half of Illinois. Throw FL-25 (and its sister races) on that list. Winning here would deprive Republicans of their last ethnic redoubt while proving that the Republican collapse has extended into yet another supposedly impregnable GOP stronghold.

We can help make it happen. Support Joe Garcia and his efforts to turn south Florida Blue this November.

On the web:
Blue Majority ActBlue page
Joe Garcia for Congress

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 01:48 PM PDT.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  trippi just signed on (6+ / 0-)

    to work for him, which is good, I guess.

  •  but what will DEBBIE DO.... n/t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    homoaffectional

    "THE SURGE IS WORKING" is the 2008 replacement for "MISSION ACCOMPLISHED"

    by KnotIookin on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 01:51:49 PM PDT

  •  Miami-Dada? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    willyr, felagund

    That is so not South Florida...

    © sardonyx; all rights reserved

    by sardonyx on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 01:54:07 PM PDT

  •  Only Latino Republican federal office holders? (5+ / 0-)

    Mel Martinez is never gonna forgive you for that...

    The underest dog is just as good as I am, and I'm just as good as the toppest dog. - Jimmie Rodgers

    by GreenCA on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 01:54:32 PM PDT

  •  Go Joe (4+ / 0-)

    Good Luck Sir !!

    when talk started he would run several months ago someone for So Florida came here & did one of those $5.00 dollar diaries to let Joe know he had support
    I did the 5 bucks back then.

    I will do something for him in the near future !
    But money is very tie right now

    :(

  •  only two days late (0+ / 0-)

    "So long as we have enough people in this country willing to fight for their rights, we'll be called a democracy." -Roger Baldwin

    by voila on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 01:55:40 PM PDT

  •  BTW (3+ / 0-)

    I thought it was interesting -- FL-25 was Obama's strongest Latino-majority district in the country...Clinton barely beat him there. Any explanations?

    I think it's great that Florida Democrats are finally challenging these Cuban areas and running credible challengers in districts long ceded to the GOP.

    Every day, more and more states do not count. Today 26 states (plus D.C., V.I., D.A., and the TX caucus) face meaninglessness. You can help!

    by Nathaniel Ament Stone on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 01:56:24 PM PDT

  •  Are you out of your minds? (0+ / 0-)

    Garcia was involved in the fanatical Cuban American National Foundation, AND part of the New Democratic Network, the pro-business democrats?

    With Dems like Garcia, who needs Republicans?

    •  It's a GOP district (6+ / 0-)

      You can't expect to have a Democrat in the mold of a Barney Frank or a Russ Feingold.

    •  NDN's Hispanic project (8+ / 0-)

      is doing the best work in the entire country pushing back against anti-immigrant sentiment in DC, and I've used its research to convince campaigns all around the country to advocate for sensible immigration reform.

      Meanwhile, Joe wants out of Iraq and wouldn't give retroactive immunity to telecom companies who spied on us.

      So what exactly is your beef?

      •  The CANF was pretty bad news in the Jorge Mas (0+ / 0-)

        Canosa era.  I still recall attending a Paul Simon for Prez function over 20 years ago where I got into a heated discussion w/ a CANF member.  In the 90's, Mas unleashed a major ad campaign against the Miami Herald, which tended to intimidate a lot of other news outlets as well.

        Mas was a BFF of JoeMentum.  Joe, in fact, spent the better part of the day 9 days before the 2000 election visiting Mas's grave and sucking up to the CANF.  Maybe the CANF isn't as bad today as it was when Mas harbored ambitions of becoming a latter-day Batista, but Garcia's ties to it aren't a selling point.

        Some men see things as they are and ask why. I see things that never were and ask why not?

        by RFK Lives on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 02:23:34 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Perhaps CANF is the reason why Debbie opposes (0+ / 0-)

          The Miami Herald article I read said Debbie was so successful precisely because she opposes loosening restrictions on Cuba.  The CANF website includes this (for example):

          This is precisely why, a liberalization of Cuban American travel is also crucial to learning more about the internal situation and helping to further destabilize the regime’s hold on power.  

          It appears Republicans are so successful catering to the anti Fidel crowd, and Debbie was successful by catering to the same group.  If they want to elect Democrats there, the DCCC might pay attention to a winning strategy.

          I love the 50 state strategy, but I've thought the DCCC's candidate selection process leaves a lot to be desired ever since Tammy Duckworth.

          OTOH, I know next to nothing about South Florida, so I'll just stay out of this.  But I would like to read an analysis by a subject matter expert -- instead of the "off with her head" comments from people who I suspect know less than I do on the subject.

          Bush Administration: Proving the saying, "You can fool most of the people some of the time, and 30% 24% 19% all the time."

          by Helpless on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 04:40:36 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  That's rediculous (6+ / 0-)

      Joe turned CANF into a more moderate institution while it was previously controlled by only Republicans.

      Here he was on Florida Progressive Radio talking about the war in Iraq, the netroots, the Democratic Party, and public financing:

      The impact that it has is fabulous. A lot of Hispanics read this kind of thing...the effect this is having is phenomenal. It’s also having an impact in Washington in the supposed geniuses in Washington who for ten years have tried taking back Congress.

      ...

      The very fact that people are expressing their will is impacting politics....the Republicans are talk-down with no bubble effect [from the bottom-up]...Republicans are always going to have more money, but they’re not able to control the medium.

      ...

      Part of what has to happen, the netroots has to be play a bigger role so the Democrats find their courage again. We’ve lost courage in the biggest issues of the day. We tend to be scared off by Iraq, rather than truely supporting our troops by bringing them home. We talk about campaign finance reform and are scared about the costs, rather than fixing the political system that is paid for by special interests, fixed for special intersts and run by special interests.

      ...

      I want to thank everyone for doing this, what you’re doing is important...Thank you very much."

      On the issue of Cuba, he wants to end travel restrictions and allow unification of families. That's an even more progressive position than Rep Wasserman Schultz and most other Democrats, especially in Florida.

    •  Confused? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      WayneNight

      What is so pro-business about the New Democratic Network? Maybe you are thinking of the Democratic Leadership Conference, the DLC.

      TheNDN site describes them as "A 21st Century Progressive Advocacy and Political Organization."

  •  Slight error (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    weelzup, smash artist

    It's three representatives in the region -- Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (FL-18), Lincoln Diaz-Balart (FL-21), and Mario Diaz-Balart (FL-25) are the only Latino federal office holders in the entire Republican Party.

    Isn't one of Florida's U.S. Senator's a GOP Hispanic, as well?

  •  Wait. You can be Congressman for the Everglades? (6+ / 0-)

    "My fellow swamp things..."

    (crocodiles raise heads slightly)

    "I am running for Congress because it is high time we actually have people move into this Congressional District!  More people!  Less mosquitoes!

    Now, if you will excuse me, I have to take a boat out to that rickety cabin and talk to Old Man Peters, the only human being in this district!

    Vote early!"

    (bullfrog croaks)

    The Last Thing We Need is Democratic Convention 1968 Part II

    by LarsThorwald on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 02:03:30 PM PDT

  •  Joe Garcia is a true progressive (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Woody, WayneNight, beijingbetty

    and a good man, and an honest Democrat who will focus on DOMESTIC issues. Let's support him and send Mario Diaz-Balart packing. Oh, and while you're at it spare some change for Raul Martinez so we can get Lincoln Diaz-Balart out of my district, FL-21.

    -7.38, -5.23 One day we ALL will know the truth about the 2000 presidential election. God help us all.

    by CocoaLove on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 02:05:34 PM PDT

  •  $25.... (0+ / 0-)

    FUCK DWS! AND DCCC!

    77 65 65 6c 7a 75 70

    by weelzup on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 02:08:24 PM PDT

  •  Is Mel Martinez (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    weelzup, WayneNight

    Norwegian?

  •  Joe Garcia: The Netroots are the courage..." (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    beijingbetty

    Here was Joe Garcia calling the netroots "The courage of the Democratic Party," on Florida Progressive Radio. He also spoke out forcefully on not giving into Bush on Iraq.

    The impact that it has is fabulous. A lot of Hispanics read this kind of thing...the effect this is having is phenomenal. It’s also having an impact in Washington in the supposed geniuses in Washington who for ten years have tried taking back Congress.

    ...

    The very fact that people are expressing their will is impacting politics....the Republicans are talk-down with no bubble effect [from the bottom-up]...Republicans are always going to have more money, but they’re not able to control the medium.

    ...

    Part of what has to happen, the netroots has to be play a bigger role so the Democrats find their courage again. We’ve lost courage in the biggest issues of the day. We tend to be scared off by Iraq, rather than truely supporting our troops by bringing them home. We talk about campaign finance reform and are scared about the costs, rather than fixing the political system that is paid for by special interests, fixed for special intersts and run by special interests.

    ...

    I want to thank everyone for doing this, what you’re doing is important...Thank you very much."

    http://www.dailykos.com/...

    Joe Garcia will be a progressive leader in Congress.

  •  Why are so many Cubans anti-Dem? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    WayneNight

    Is it the strong Republican pro-embargo stance?  Is it latent anger at Kennedy's failure at Bay of Pigs?  It all about Elian Gonzalez?  

    This aspect of Florida politics perplexes me.

    •  I think it's a combination... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Rolfyboy6, tonyfv

      ...of the Bay of Pigs failure, plus the fact that during the Cold War they viewed Republicans as being more "anti-communist."  The GOP helped this along by taking the pro-embargo, hard line anti-Castro stance that you point out.

      Then again, I'm not from Florida, nor do I know any Cuban Americans.  So, I could just be full of shit.

      •  Too broad a brush perhaps (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Rolfyboy6, tonyfv, WayneNight, MantisOahu

        But it is historical fact that a big chunk of the original refugees were already fascists before they left Cuba, so the Repub Party seemed the natural home.

        The first refugees were largely from the ruling class, and they owned things, like distilleries and bottling plants and sugar plantations, that were soon nationalized by Castro. (The first crop of these refugees "escaped" by flying Pan Am out of Havana.) Most had been political supporters of the overthrown Batista dictatorship, as well. The Diaz-Balert brothers, in fact, are sons of the Majority Leader in the Cuban Congress during the Batista regime.

        Of course, not all the refugees were so rich or so powerful. New York City once had a bunch of Cuban-Chinese restaurants, owned by small-time businessmen whose restaurants back on the island had been taken over along with the power plants and telephone company. And by the time of the Mariel boatlift, under Jimmy Carter, most of those refugees were poor people sick and tired of living under Castro's dictatorship and its failed economic plan.

    •  I think it's more about the Republicans being (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Rolfyboy6

      more fervently anti communist and against any accomodations with Cuba and Castro. The Democrats aren't as strongly opposed to trade and travel to Cuba.
      I don't think it has so much to do with losing at the Bay of Pigs.

      •  Except for DWS (0+ / 0-)

        Bush Administration: Proving the saying, "You can fool most of the people some of the time, and 30% 24% 19% all the time."

        by Helpless on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 04:47:39 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Miami is changing (0+ / 0-)

        Before the Bay of Pigs Cubans voted Democratic. The Republicans made a concerted effort tailored to local politics to blame Kennedy for failing to back up the invasion with air support and to portray the Democrats as Communist appeasers and sympathizers.

        Things are very different today. That generation of Cubans is dying off. There has been a huge influx of other Hispanics from Colombia, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, Argentina, Venezuela and Brazil as well as a very large influx of Haitians. Younger Cubans don't think like their parents and Cubans who have arrived more recently and lived under the embargo and still have family in Cuba aren't big fans of the Draconian restrictions on remittances to family and travel. Cubans are very big on family and laws that divide family and prevent family members from helping family in Cuba are not as popular as the old guard pretend.

  •  What winning would mean... (5+ / 0-)
    Taking these South Florida seats would mean ending the dynasty on the Republican control of Cuban issues. It would allow for a huge change on Cuban foreign policy since all of our three candidates want to ease travel restrictions and allow for the unification of families. That's the more progressive position on the issue, that Rep. Wasserman Schultz in her 70% blue district has fought against.

    Clearly winning would be a seachange in South Florida and on the national level for foreign policy.

    Also as for the Everglades, we need someone representing such an important natural area that actually cares about the environment. This is something that should get all of us motivated to take this seat. Mario Diaz-Balart got a 15% score from LCV, that's pathetic. It's time for change.

    •  Even just coming close to winning... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Rolfyboy6

      ...would be a major accomplishment.

      We have to keep in mind that, sometimes, narrowly losing can be a good sign, especially if it's in a district that has always been heavily GOP.  It means we're at least making inroads, and building something that could give us a victory down the line.

  •  Mainland Monroe County (0+ / 0-)

    I didn't know until just now that only 60 people live in the FL-25 portion of Monroe county.

    They probably could have just merged the mainland portion with Collier County or something.

    Almost 80K live in the county (which is in FL-18). So yes.. 60 people on the mainland, 80K in the Keys.

    "Our country right or wrong. When right, to be kept right; when wrong, to be put right" - Carl Schurz

    by RBH on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 02:25:11 PM PDT

  •  All the money I would have given to DCCC is . . . (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Woody, beijingbetty

    going to Raul Martinez, Joe Garcia, and Annette Taddeo.

  •  HOORAY (0+ / 0-)

    My city needs a change. <3333 Miami</p>

    -5.38 -4.95 - "If my doctor told me I had only six minutes to live, I wouldn't brood. I'd type a little faster." - Isaac Asimov

    by b1oody8romance7 on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 02:37:36 PM PDT

  •  Most South Florida Cubans are Democrats (4+ / 0-)

    I've been making this assertion for years.  As far back as the 80s and 90s, the Cuban community started to shift Democrat, even while powerful anti-Castro fanatics all but forced Cubans to register Republican and patriarchs in Cuban families coerced their wives and children to register Republican, many were voting Democrat.  Traditional Cuban families exert a lot of influence and pressure on the younger generation, but you never know what someone will do when they get alone in the voting booth without anyone looking over their shoulder.

    Finally we're seeing a truer more accurate representation of the Cuban community of Dade County which has now spread well into Broward County and up to Palm Beach County. The reality is that Cubans are natural Democrats, and now that the majority of Cuban immigration into the United States is no longer coming through South Florida political indoctrination funnel, and the Cuban community has spread out across the United States, we are seeing the emergence of this new more progressive generation, and the creation of a voting bloc that realizes which party actually has their best interests at heart.

    Cuba will be free and a new day will dawn for the Cuban people, but the freedom of that nation will not be brought about by the hard-line Republican resisters to normalization of relations with the Cuban government, no it will come through the diplomacy and compromise of a Democratic president and Democratic Congress.

  •  Slight Correction (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    WayneNight

    Technically, since the November 2006 election, both Republican, Democratic and other registrations are down, mostly due to significant cleaning of the voter rolls in Florida.

    However there is a net gain of 4963 in FL-25,  3961 in FL-21 and 9128 in FL-18 for the Democrats over the Republicans.

    Nill illigitimi carborundum

    by kansasr on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 02:51:51 PM PDT

  •  This makes me extremely nervous (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    beijingbetty

    Garcia's defenders say that the CANF has changed.  However, in the past, it was a terrorist organization, and had the target of the terrorism been any country other than Cuba, its leaders would be in jail now.

    From the New York Times:

    A Cuban exile who has waged a campaign of bombings and assassination attempts aimed at toppling Fidel Castro says that his efforts were supported financially for more than a decade by the Cuban-American leaders of one of America's most influential lobbying groups.

    The exile, Luis Posada Carriles, said he organized a wave of bombings in Cuba last year at hotels, restaurants and discotheques, killing an Italian tourist and alarming the Cuban Government. Posada was schooled in demolition and guerrilla warfare by the Central Intelligence Agency in the 1960's.

    In a series of tape-recorded interviews at a walled Caribbean compound, Posada said the hotel bombings and other operations had been supported by leaders of the Cuban-American National Foundation.

    From ZNET:

    on June 22, 2006, Jose Antonio Llama, a former CANF director, revealed publicly what everyone knew for a long time: the CANF is a terrorist organization. Llama acknowledged that he, along with members of the organization´s hierarchy, had set up a paramilitary group to carry out attacks on Cuba and to assassinate its president, Fidel Castro [1].

    According to "Toñin", as his friends call him, the CANF had a cargo helicopter, ten ultra-light remote-controlled planes, seven boats, a Midnight Express speedboat and an unlimited amount of explosives. "We were impatient about the survival of the Castro regime after the demise of the Soviet Union and the socialist system. We wanted to speed up democratization in Cuba using any means to achieve it," he said ...

    Now, it is clear that Joe Garcia is more moderate than former CANF leaders: he opposed the Bush restrictions on family travel to Cuba that were imposed in 2004, and the hard-liners from CANF split off to form the Cuban Liberty Council.  However, he supports the embargo, and as far as I know, he's never denounced terrorism as a tactic against the Castro regime.

    I'd love to see Cuba move in a democratic direction, but we're not going to get that from the exiles in Miami.

    I've contributed to plenty of netroots fundraisers in the past, but until I see an explicit denunciation of past CANF tactics, and of the use of violence against Cuban civilians or tourist facilities as a tactic, no money from me.

  •  Devin Nunes (R, CA-21) is Portuguese (0+ / 0-)

    does that count as Latino?

  •  This is a very tough district (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MantisOahu

    While the Dade County part of the district is Republican, the Collier County area is much more so. Monroe County is hardly a factor here because almost all of its population lives in the 18th district. Almost 99% of Monroe's population lives in the Keys. I think that the 25th might have maybe 10 or 20 people in the Monroe County part.

    Garcia is going to have to keep his losses down in the Collier County area. Naples is heavily Republican. I do think that the district might include the migrant worker town of Immoaklee, but even that town is probably Republican.

    This district is a perfect example of how the Republicans gerrymandered Florida. It makes no sense to put the Naples suburbs and Miami suburbs into one district. They have different issues, but they are both heavily Republican.

  •  Thank You (0+ / 0-)

    We're all very excited and appreciate all of your help. Let's do this.

  •  I live down here, JOE IS AN AWESOME guy and (0+ / 0-)

    candidate, I am so pissed about this whole thing!

  •  Donald Fagen? (0+ / 0-)

    Is it me or does Joe Garcia look like Donald Fagen's hispanic doppelganger? (I believe I just got the goodbye look).

    " ... or a baby's arm holding an apple!"

    by Lavocat on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 05:34:12 PM PDT

  •  Website is crap (0+ / 0-)

    Almost made me think their web page designer must work for the other guys.

    Font size is tiny. Could barely read half the things on their pages.

    And they have this weird white background that hurts your eyes when you look at it. Makes it look like a ghost.

    Was thinking of picking their campaign to support.

    But this made me think they were too inept. Any candidate who hasn't looked at his website, noticed it was really shoddy and said WTF...

    Well, it's not a good sign

  •  Joe I just contributed (0+ / 0-)

    through Act-Blue. It's great news to hear about a fellow Cuban-American who has a brain!

    Hillary - the new Divider.

    by tonyfv on Wed Mar 19, 2008 at 08:24:07 PM PDT

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site