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Alternative Schools aren't much of an alternative, and even less of a school

I have lived in Atlanta for 20 years. I worked as a mental health professional for Fulton County for 8 of those years and that put me in frequent and in-depth contact with the "school system" here.

There are 2 main school systems: Fulton County School and Atlanta Public Schools, or APS. Fulton County covers a large area and the schools range in quality. Atlanta schools, those run by the the city, are almost uniformly abysmal.

Below is an excerpt of a recent report about a particular private school agency that has come in to provide "alternative school" for the city.

And it stinks.

Forrest Hill Academy: The children left behind

When school opened in August, Patti Welch and her son got their first look at Forrest Hill.

Welch went through a 90-minute orientation, where the rules of the school were laid out. Patrick wasn't to bring anything onto campus that was considered contraband. The list included watches, jewelry, purses, combs, brushes, keys and money in excess of $5. Paper and pens weren't allowed either; the school would provide everything that was needed, even tampons for female students.

Patrick would go through a metal detector each morning and be patted down by a security guard to ensure he didn't have weapons or drugs. Backpacks weren't allowed, and books couldn't be taken home. In fact, there was no homework for Forrest Hill students.

To make a long story short the school system is required by law to provide special education to students who meet the criteria.

Here in Atlanta, and I assume in most other major cities, there are a lot of kids who have behavior troubles stemming from one thing or another. In my years of work with "troubled kids" the basic inability to read is the central feature I look for when one is referred to me.

By 3rd grade, almost all of the work is couched in reading. Even math, which the kids I have worked with can do without problem, becomes the infamous "story problem". Kids who cannot read begin to act up at this point for, again, a variety of reasons. I think a lot of it starts with the child being aware they cannot read and knowing that others will make fun of them and call them "stupid". After all they would do the same thing to others if they could only read.

So becoming a nuisance, the class clown (I now use the term "Pain in the Class"), the bully, whatever, becomes better than being called stupid by your peers. That's grossly oversimplified but more or less the essence of the dynamic.

Usually, the child never learns to read and the problems are compounded by just being moved on. I have seen so many 9th grade boys who cannot read a can of beans but the school has them placed in Algebra 1 and French. (!)

Instead of expending the resources necessary to address the problems, the school makes a case that the child is anti-social which is a big loophole in the Federal Law. If the child is "found" to be anti-social, the school can just wash their hands of them and legally expel them. I have witnessed this used on an industrial scale here in Atlanta.

More from the article:

CEP claimed it had found the key to educating a student population that was thought to be beyond help. The schools used a computer-based education program called PLATO that CEP said enables students to quickly catch up to their age level in reading and math skills.

*****

It's unclear exactly how CEP came to acquire a $6.9 million contract to open an alternative school in Atlanta. Richardson says the school system contacted the company in 2001. Citing the pending ACLU lawsuit, Atlanta school officials won't even talk about CEP.

The CEP company is founded out of and upon Republican party ties and was even cheered on by George W. Bush.

It built its business on lies and false claims and has become a lightening rod for criticism, including an active ACLU lawsuit.

Two years ago, a special education lawyer in Atlanta called the ACLU and suggested they investigate the CEP school in Atlanta. "As soon as we began to scratch the surface, we were so outraged by what we found," says the ACLU's Chiang. "The standardized test scores are really shocking. No one was passing."

There are also "allegations" of physical confrontations between CEP staff and the students. The company, OF COURSE denies them and plays them down, but I am here to tell you, it's endemic.

The Alternative School, with a few semi-decent exceptions here in Atlanta, are simply alternative versions of the bootcamp mentality as well as direct manifestations of racism: the vast majority of students thrown into these school, including 99% of the people I have worked with, are b...b..b..b..black.

The racism inherent in the Atlanta school system is breathtaking and rather easy to demonstrate, and just as easy for  compromised professionals (those earning a living with CEP, for example) to explain away.

I used to work with a black male psychiatrist. He had spent 25 years in the Navy, ran mental health centers in Hawai'i. Alaska and China. He knew his shit. He railed on about the school's inherent bias against healthy black males and how the "no tolerance" of fighting is just a mechanism to emasculate males in general.

Fighting is a special problem, at least here. Kids are mean and so  many from the poverty-stricked areas and housing projects seem to have fighting as their main hobby. Tbhey fight day and night. I often think of them having a Day Planner with fights booked into the next summer.

I have worked with child after child who was clearly being attacked and fought back to defend themselves only to be kicked out of school for fighting. Grades and academic standing be damned. Sharp students can get out of Alternative School pretty quickly but - lo and behold - one gets no academic credits while in Alternative school, so they are STILL further behind than before they went there.

The rest of the students who "end up there" are year's behind academically and are now in a place where they will get the LEAST of what they really need along with what's already known to not work: harsh treatment and endless browbeating by older people with an axe to grind about today's "youth".

I worked with a situation once, recently, where a teenage girl appeared flippant to a teacher and the teacher had 2 security guards grab her and take her down on the floor. Her brother saw this and jumped in. Both were arrested, handcuffed and thrown in a police car and sent to jail.

The court took the teacher's side in this and forcefully referred them to the private mental health center where I was working. I interviewed the family and could find nothing where they met the very stringent Medicaid criteria for the program the Judge wanted them to be in. So I dismissed them and thought nothing more about it. To try and make them fit would be fraud.

The probation officer follwed up and went ballistic and DEMANDED they be re-assessed. I was told to do this and I did. I spent 4 hours with them, twice as much as necessary, only to not find anything to defend their involvement in the porogram. I think my supervisor went behind my back and changed what I worte because soon after I saw them they were admitted into the treatment. Staff came to me and asked why I did that and I explained I didn't.

So I quit. And I recently learned they lost their ability to provide some of those services.

The point is that the "system" is very keen on flushing young black men out of the schools and into the courts and penal system.

Programs like CEP merely acclimate the youth to a life of detention, crime, and prison. See this for more about that.

These dynamics benefit the GOP as budget monies flow to companies that support them and that play into racist desires to weed out black men and ruin their lives.

This doesn't have to be so.

The motto of APS, ironically, is

If it's good for the children, then make it so

But they ain't makin' it so.

Update [2008-5-8 12:59:23 by xxdr zombiexx]: Some folks mention that the title was too blunt and not fair for the alternative schools that are doing a good job, so I have added a ? to the the title to make it more of a provocative question.

I do know some Alternative Schools do a reasonably good job with the resources available and that actually belongs under the more general discussion of why schools are scratching for pennies while prsions and the military get the money.

Originally posted to Toking Points Memo on Thu May 08, 2008 at 08:01 AM PDT.

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Comment Preferences

  •  This is a national disgrace. (33+ / 0-)

    Glad the ACLU is outraged.

    There's no money for your issue so long as we're squandering $50 billion a year on the DrugWar. Ben Masel

    by xxdr zombiexx on Thu May 08, 2008 at 08:02:46 AM PDT

  •  Tips for NO CANDIATE names (22+ / 0-)

    being necessary to write a whole diary.

    There's no money for your issue so long as we're squandering $50 billion a year on the DrugWar. Ben Masel

    by xxdr zombiexx on Thu May 08, 2008 at 08:06:48 AM PDT

  •  Excellent Diary Entry (6+ / 0-)

    Thank you very much.  Recommended!

  •  Sounds pretty bad... (4+ / 0-)

    but what was the public school system in this district like before this? Better, Same or even worse.

  •  IMHO We're Going To Look Back (4+ / 0-)

    at this time in history and see it as our downfall. I don't see how we can compete in a global market if our children don't have a basic understanding of math and science.

    Let us not forget New Orleans. Visit Project Katrina.

    by webranding on Thu May 08, 2008 at 08:11:57 AM PDT

  •  Silly (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    xxdr zombiexx, fiddler crabby

    that's where they'll end up anyway - I'm surprised they don't just send the black males directly into prison.

    This is all about doing what is easiest and most profitable.

    "You have attributed conditions to villainy that simply result from stupidity"

    by newfie on Thu May 08, 2008 at 08:13:59 AM PDT

  •  Zombie...our group can use your help. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    xxdr zombiexx

    The World is my country, all mankind are my brethren, and to do good is my religion. --Thomas Paine

    by David Kroning on Thu May 08, 2008 at 08:14:10 AM PDT

  •  I had to do a double take (3+ / 0-)

    before I realized you were talking about a private school.

    This sounds like another case of trying to corporatize education with an assembly line mentality.

    Maybe not everyone can be great at math, and not everyone will write War and Peace, but I'm a firm believer that if you give kids individual attention, and present them with a wide range of subjects, they will find something that they enjoy and are good at and they will learn.

    You often hear people say that we can't afford to have that kind of education here and we need to cut arts, and foreign language programs, and less popular sports, etc, etc.  

    Well, as US children fall farther and farther behind kids in the rest of the world educationally, I have to ask how can we afford not to spend the necessary money to educate our kids?  If we don't, the rest of the world is going to be making hydrogen cars and faster computers while we all flip burgers for each other.

    "The meek shall inherit nothing" - F. Zappa

    by cometman on Thu May 08, 2008 at 08:16:27 AM PDT

    •  There are a couple state-funded alternatives (3+ / 0-)

      and are a bit better than the school focused on here... but they remain fraught with problems.

      The money we spend on helping kids NOW pays off in the future in terms of FEWER prisoners.

      Given that the GOP funds and benefits from funding private prison groups, it's understandable why the GOP would like to have a mechanism for creating an endless supply of prisoners.

      There's no money for your issue so long as we're squandering $50 billion a year on the DrugWar. Ben Masel

      by xxdr zombiexx on Thu May 08, 2008 at 08:18:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I think "Alternative School" in the title is (4+ / 0-)

    misleading, for not all alternative schools are like the one you describe, not by a long shot.  My son attends an alternative school, it is a very good school.  Is there a more specific term that could be used in the title?

    "The trust of a city street is formed over time from many, many little public contacts." - Jane Jacobs, 1961

    by eyesonthestreet on Thu May 08, 2008 at 08:20:03 AM PDT

    •  Doubtless some are decent....but (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      fiddler crabby

      Here in Atlanta though they seem to come in "Fair at best" to really not a good place for a child to go, to the finishing school for prison described here.

      Mostly, the ones I have seen? I'd rather children go to a bar: at least there the staff adheres to the rules and the children won't see or hear anything worse than they would at the school.

      There's no money for your issue so long as we're squandering $50 billion a year on the DrugWar. Ben Masel

      by xxdr zombiexx on Thu May 08, 2008 at 08:27:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I love the content of your diary (0+ / 0-)

        But the title gave me extreme pause. If it had a location in the title, or perhaps not linked 'alternative schools' to racism, I think it would have been a stronger presentation.

        Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

        by elfling on Thu May 08, 2008 at 09:08:23 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I agree. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      fiddler crabby

      My first thought was that this diary was generalizing alternative schools.  There truly are good ones out there.  

    •  There is alternative which is different (0+ / 0-)

      and alternative which is for the uncontrollable.

      How did I live without him?

      by Pumpkinlove on Thu May 08, 2008 at 09:00:05 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  That's a prison, not a school. (4+ / 0-)

    Patted down? Not allowed combs or backpacks? Good grief.

    Got a problem with my posts? Email me, and let's resolve it.

    by drbloodaxe on Thu May 08, 2008 at 08:22:15 AM PDT

  •  Thank you, xxdr. (3+ / 0-)

    For this diary and for the work you do with so-called "troubled kids." Literacy is key, the foundation of building a meaningful life in this culture. That is not to say that oral traditions shouldn't be cherished and transmitted, of course; and they should be encouraged. But in these so-called United States, access to everything from society to self is based on literacy.

    Seul l'incrédule a droit au miracle. - Elias Canetti Road2DC

    by srkp23 on Thu May 08, 2008 at 08:23:37 AM PDT

  •  the whole m.o. of the Republican right (4+ / 0-)

    is to privatize everything.  It continues to be a right-wing Republican goal to push "alternative," "charter," incentives to attend parochial schools, etc... in order to end public school education as we know it.  That's the whole reason for "No Child Left Behind," an unfunded mandate that causes public schools to fail.  Hopefully, the new administration will change this shameful direction.  Ending No Child Left Behind would be a great start.

  •  Yup (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fiddler crabby, blindyone

    It ought to be classified as a crime against humanity to deny children the gift of reading on a systematic basis. In today's world, you might as well just blind them, and cut off their legs.

  •  I love education diaries. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fiddler crabby, karmsy

    Thanks for an insider's take.  
    On a related topic, I live to read and now have a son who's seven and who without my intervention would never learn to read.  I have quickly become up to speed on dyslexia and find that the estimates range as high as 20% of the population.  These children need massive focused innovative education.  They don't need boot camp.
    Anyway, thanks for your work and for sharing.

  •  This diary rang bells for me (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fiddler crabby

    all over the place.

    I live in an urban area and work for a shoddy, poor school system. The kids are tough. They are rude and whiney and have rotten attitudes, as often as not. They come from run-down neighborhoods and, in many cases, chaotic homes. It is tempting to blame them for the failures of the schools, but it is SO unfair.

    This week I worked at what we call out here a "continuation" school. It's where the kids go, who have dropped out, or been thrown out, and they still want to finish up their high school degree. Or maybe the judge has ordered them here. The district's continuation schools, in other words, serve the toughest of the tough.

    Still, the entire campus is surrounded by a 15-foot steel fence. When you walk in the front entrance, the security guard searches you with a metal detector. The principal is a miserable sort, barking orders to staff and kids alike.

    And this is where you're supposed to come to learn to be a "productive member of society." Yeeeesh.

    •  Not all continuation schools are like that, (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      karmsy

      of course.

      Some actually do serve their populations well, giving them a smaller environment and better individualized attention.

      Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

      by elfling on Thu May 08, 2008 at 09:02:56 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The other side of alternative schools (7+ / 0-)

    I am a teacher and we start to send kids to alternative schools at middle school.  

    Let me describe the last child we referred to an alternative school; I will call him Todd.

    Todd  yells  in the middle of class, throwing things at other students, touch girls inappropriately, makes physical threats against other students, makes inappropriate comments about homosexuality, refers to adults as stupid, retarded and worse, responds to simple requests with screaming.

    Todd's behavior is so incredibly disruptive not only to his classmates but to his own learning.  This is a child who routinely scores less than 20% on tests and quizzes.  His behavior frequently results in removal from class.

    Todd is frequently late to class and frequently wandering the halls disrupting other classes.  Todd has been known to vandalize school property and to assault other students.

    NONE of the interventions that we have tried with Todd have worked.  Not a one.

    He is not learning where he is and he is stopping other students from learning.

    He needs to be moved to our alternative placement.

    How did I live without him?

    by Pumpkinlove on Thu May 08, 2008 at 08:52:29 AM PDT

    •  Being a middle school teacher, (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      duck, Pumpkinlove

      I'd imagine you probably teach 5 periods, and have about 30 in every class.

      If so, you have way too heavy a load to much help a kid like "Todd," who is probably hurting for healthy attention he isn't getting at home--I'd guess.

      That's a hard one right there. What do you do? I agree with education reformers of all stripes, who say we sorely need smaller classes. Maybe way smaller.

      •  You are right (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        xxdr zombiexx, karmsy

        Every year, I see about three Todds out of my 150.  2%.  They are often, though not always, special education students.  

        Most of their parents have given up on these kids... sometimes we've seen older siblings who do fine and sometimes we've seen older siblings with the same problems.  It isn't always poor parenting.

        Some of them need to be removed to an EH classroom.

        They are inevitably poor.  The parents of rich children can afford private schools or lawyers to force homebound schooling.

        How did I live without him?

        by Pumpkinlove on Thu May 08, 2008 at 09:13:55 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I work with the Todds of the world. (0+ / 0-)

      Todd needs a lot more structure, to begin with.

      Regular school ain't for him.

      There's no money for your issue so long as we're squandering $50 billion a year on the DrugWar. Ben Masel

      by xxdr zombiexx on Thu May 08, 2008 at 10:38:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  THere are also "psychoeducation" centers. (0+ / 0-)

        I have worked with several here and 2 of them are pretty awesome, really. 2 of them are horrible.

        They have the ability to really address things and a couple of the school s I like are decent models for what can be done to address these sorts of issues.

        And doubtless: what's up with the boy's parents and family situation?

        Many questions arise....  I like doing this work, by the way. Somebody's gotta do it ;)

        There's no money for your issue so long as we're squandering $50 billion a year on the DrugWar. Ben Masel

        by xxdr zombiexx on Thu May 08, 2008 at 10:41:47 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Help me here... (5+ / 0-)

    Instead of expending the resources necessary to address the problems, the school makes a case that the child is anti-social which is a big loophole in the Federal Law. If the child is "found" to be anti-social, the school can just wash their hands of them and legally expel them.

    What EXACTLY are we to do with students who deal drugs, bring weapons or start fights at school? Those are the three reasons that get you sent to alternative school in most systems. This may get me banned, but I am SICK of Social Service and Juvenile Justice people coming to my school to tell us how we're not doing OUR job. Doesn't the child have any responsibility to attempt to learn? Any?

    I provide an environment where ANY child will get the opportunity to learn - I've had kids with IQs in the 70s and a 2nd grade reading level get a C in my class. They tried, so I diversified my teaching strategy, and built assignments that would give them success in a way that still required them to learn the content and express that knowledge.

    But I will not suffer lightly a student who's dealing drugs, starting fights or threatening staff in my school. You can make all the excuses you want, but they need to be educated in a setting that does not include other students they could harm.

    Has everyone forgotten McCain was one of the Keating Five?

    by duck on Thu May 08, 2008 at 08:52:39 AM PDT

    •  Damn straight! (0+ / 0-)

      How did I live without him?

      by Pumpkinlove on Thu May 08, 2008 at 09:01:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The "no violence" rule must be firm (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      xxdr zombiexx, Dark UltraValia

      But I will not suffer lightly a student who's dealing drugs, starting fights or threatening staff in my school. You can make all the excuses you want, but they need to be educated in a setting that does not include other students they could harm.

      I've taught in some of those alternative settings for the most difficult kids. The schools that worked best had both broad and deep support from onsite psychologists and social workers who could take over when a student couldn't control him- or herself, where students were rewarded for talking it over with talented, supportive, and popular counselors, and teachers (who aren't immune to getting angry, too) were encouraged to do the same. Of course, that's expensive, but probably less than prison time for a percentage of these kids.  

      And, although not at the school I just described, I did see a certain amount of gaming the system, especially where federal funds were involved.

      Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction -- Pascal

      by RJDixon74135 on Thu May 08, 2008 at 09:28:16 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The answer to that is long-winded (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dark UltraValia

      to say the least.

      I am one of those who works with these exact kids.

      There are policies in place that make the situation worse, rather than better.

      And there really are a number of anti-social kids, just not nearly as many as the school tries to claim.

      And again... money. Schools get scraps, more or less, compared to military spending.

      Efforts to get kids to read competently by age 9 or so (or earlier...dare to dream, they say) would solve so much of the things you describe

      What EXACTLY are we to do with students who deal drugs, bring weapons or start fights at school? Those are the three reasons that get you sent to alternative school in most systems. This may get me banned, but I am SICK of Social Service and Juvenile Justice people coming to my school to tell us how we're not doing OUR job. Doesn't the child have any responsibility to attempt to learn? Any?

      You are totally correct - it AIN'T the school's job, in the end, to fix these things. It certainly isn't your job.

      Schools should and do do testing on children at an early age and that testing reveals a lot of data. There needs to be funding for those who don't do as well etc... etc... etc.. from an early age. blah blah blah. Again, the kids I see causing your problems are almost invariably waaaay behind academically.  

      But no, teachers shouldn't have to waste time with all this stuff.

      Much of it can be dealt with differently, but what you see are more or less symptoms of underlying historically intractable issues, like poverty and racism.

      Illiteracy is one of those issues that I think can be dented severely and re-framing the focus on hyperactive "problem kids" at the earliest opportunity to do so is quite feasible but "the system" is reluctant to change swiftly.

      There's no money for your issue so long as we're squandering $50 billion a year on the DrugWar. Ben Masel

      by xxdr zombiexx on Thu May 08, 2008 at 10:35:53 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Specics (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        duck

        What EXACTLY are we to do with students who deal drugs, bring weapons or start fights at school?

        They are supposed to be referred to mental health...however there's not a lot of that here that's really good since it was all privaitized.

        That's what's EXACTLY supposed to happen, but you need real services to refer them to.

        And I have met a lot of DJJ and DFCS people who have nary a clue about how to do their jobs.

        There's no money for your issue so long as we're squandering $50 billion a year on the DrugWar. Ben Masel

        by xxdr zombiexx on Thu May 08, 2008 at 10:50:28 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Well said doc. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    xxdr zombiexx

    We have failed our children.  To do better is an absolute imperative.

    Thanks for the diary brother.

    "The truth shall set you free - but first it'll piss you off." Gloria Steinem

    Iraq Moratorium

    by One Pissed Off Liberal on Thu May 08, 2008 at 09:02:57 AM PDT

  •  All conservative education ideas (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    xxdr zombiexx, karmsy, martydd

    consist of thinly veiled attacks on the very concept of public education.

    Let's go back to E Pluribus Unum

    by hazzcon on Thu May 08, 2008 at 09:06:03 AM PDT

  •  I understand your frustration given your (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    xxdr zombiexx, Pumpkinlove, blindyone

    mental health background, and you are no doubt correct in describing your experiences.  I would add "Some," or even "Most" to the beginning of your title, however.  I have worked at an alternative school for seven years and it is a constant struggle.  We search students as you describe, we restrain students when necessary (but have consciously undertook an effort to reduce our numbers of such incidences), and our teachers and particularly associates (classroom aides, usually physically large black men with an incredibly positive attitude and desire to make a difference in the lives of our students) are the finest and most unselfish professionals I have had the pleasure of working with.

    We operate several schools in a large city, and opereate under the motto "Unconditional Positive Regard" for the students and families we serve.  We have a mental health professional for every three classrooms (roughly 30 students), and we work with outside agencies as well.  If we were in Atlanta, you and I would have probably crossed paths.  We are a not-for-profit, which perhaps makes a difference.  

    The real issue is that the general public has no idea that millions of our youth have been damaged, first and foremost, by a complete collapse of the family unit.  Urban, suburban, everywhere.  

    When I tell people what I do, I am shown respect and usually met with the following:  "That's so great you work in such a field--it's wonderful that you're making a difference!"  But in the back of my mind is the sad reality:  I'm not.  

    The problem is too large.

    "I wear uid #113757 like a badge of honor. Now you don't have to look me up."

    by middle child on Thu May 08, 2008 at 09:31:29 AM PDT

    •  APS has historically been AMAZINGLY (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      middle child

      opposed to mental health care being provided in the schools.

      The county agency was working to get services in the school when I started in 1994 and they were still battling with them when they laid us all off in 2002.

      I am going to put a question mark in the title. I know ALL alternative schools aren't remotely this bad, but I do have a very bad image of the ones here in Atlanta.

      Something very weird goes on here.

      There's no money for your issue so long as we're squandering $50 billion a year on the DrugWar. Ben Masel

      by xxdr zombiexx on Thu May 08, 2008 at 09:53:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Title edited. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pumpkinlove, middle child

    Thanks for the constructive feedback.

    There's no money for your issue so long as we're squandering $50 billion a year on the DrugWar. Ben Masel

    by xxdr zombiexx on Thu May 08, 2008 at 10:00:03 AM PDT

    •  Didn't expect that--greatly appreciated (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      xxdr zombiexx

      btw, I forgot to mention your central premise that reading instruction is the key was dead-on.  It's also part of our focus.  If we teach students nothing BUT how to read, we have been successful academically and given a great life-changing gift.

      "I wear uid #113757 like a badge of honor. Now you don't have to look me up."

      by middle child on Thu May 08, 2008 at 10:09:28 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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