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Newly elected Alaskan Senator Mark Begich’s brother, Dr. Nick Begich, has some fascinating insights upon Defense technologies which a research instrument on the North Slope is capable of.  He has independently researched and written several books on the topic as well as serving as an expert witness and speaker before the European Parliament.

In this film he discusses the potential applications of manipulating the Earth’s magnetic field including missile detection, underground imaging, communications disruption, and controversial areas such as weather modification and mind control.  

The patent originally obtained by Bernard Eastlund from which this technology was developed stated:

"Thus, this invention provides the ability to put unprecedented amounts of power in the Earth's atmosphere at strategic locations and to maintain the power injection level, particularly if random pulsing is employed, in a manner far more precise and better controlled than heretofore accomplished by the prior art, particularly by detonation of nuclear devices of various yields at various altitudes..."

'..it is possible not only to interfere with third party communications but to take advantage of one or more such beams to carry out a communications network even though the rest of the world's communications are disrupted. Put another way, what is used to disrupt another's communications can be employed by one knowledgeable of this invention as a communication network at the same time."

.'.. large regions of the atmosphere could be lifted to an unexpectedly high altitude so that missiles encounter unexpected and unplanned drag forces with resultant destruction ...

" Weather modification is possible by, for example, altering upper atmosphere wind patterns by constructing one or more plumes of atmospheric particles which will act as a lens or focusing device. ... molecular modifications of the atmosphere can take place so that positive environmental effects can be achieved. Besides actually changing the molecular composition of an atmospheric region, a particular molecule or molecules can be chosen for increased presence. For example, ozone, nitrogen, etc., concentrations in the atmosphere could be artificially increased...

The potential for mental disruption may be the most ethically disturbing aspect of the technology.

"Political strategists are tempted to exploit research on the brain and human behavior. Geophysicist Gordon J. F.MacDonald -- specialist in problems of warfare -- says accurately-timed, artificially-excited electronic strokes 'could lead to a pattern of oscillations that produce relatively high power levels over certain regions of the earth...In this way, one could develop a system that would seriously impair the brain performance of very large populations in selected regions over an extended period'...No matter how deeply disturbing the thought of using the environment to manipulate behavior for national advantages , to some, the technology permitting such use will very probably develop within the next few decades."

"The potential applications of artificial electromagnetic fields are wide-ranging and can be used in many military or quasi-military situations...Some of these potential uses include dealing with terrorist groups, crowd control, controlling breaches of security at military installations, and antipersonnel techniques in tactical warfare. In all of these cases the EM (electromagnetic) systems would be used to produce mild to severe physiological disruption or perceptual distortion or disorientation. In addition, the ability of individuals to function could be degraded to such a point that they would be combat ineffective. Another advantage of electromagnetic systems is that they can provide coverage over large areas with a single system. They are silent and countermeasures to them may be difficult to develop... One last area where electromagnetic radiation may prove of some value is in enhancing abilities of individuals for anomalous phenomena."

Dr. Begich argues that in a Democratic society research of this nature should brought out for public discussion before its implementation is considered.  The potential impact on the environment and the health of all living things is immense.

Originally posted to The Anomaly on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 10:14 PM PST.

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Comment Preferences

  •  tips (6+ / 0-)

    "Chance has put in our way a most singular and whimsical problem, and its solution is its own reward." -Sherlock Holmes

    by The Anomaly on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 10:15:30 PM PST

    •  Wee, you're playing the haarp, (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cedwyn, smarty jones, crose

      but what of the orchestra?  MIHOP, LIHOP and DUMB, oh my!

      "Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans." John Lennon

      by trashablanca on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 10:27:07 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Didn't Cheney spend a bunch of time... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        trashablanca, crose, indigoblueskies

        ...hiding in those Deep Underground Military Bases for a while?

        I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

        by Rex Manning on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 10:50:16 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Funny, I saw a friend today who told me (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          rfall

          to search youtube for "haarp china earthquake" and this is the first one I found: http://www.youtube.com/...  It didn't make me a believer.

          "Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans." John Lennon

          by trashablanca on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 11:16:08 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Geez, what would it take to convince you? (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            trashablanca, Norbrook

            The video has graphics, lots of numbers, some sciency stuff, interviews with a few guys with titles.

            What more could you want for proof?

            Oh, yeah, like facts instead of speculation....

            Well, at least the music was kinda cool.

            "Certainly the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you; if you don't bet, you can't win." Lazurus Long

            by rfall on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 12:01:39 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  EM radiation can be a precursor to earthquakes (0+ / 0-)

              Experiments using have shown that tremors can be produced from electromagnetic pulsing.

              Not only do earthquakes cause a variety of electrical effects, but we now know how to trigger them using a pulse of artificial lightning.

              A surge of low-frequency electromagnetic radiation, known as a precursor signal, is sometimes detected before an earthquake.  When the radiographer Mike Grayson was carrying out a CAT scan in Newcastle, New South Wales, he noticed unusual streaks appearing on the image.

              Seventeen minutes later, the city was struck by a major earthquake.  The occupants of the hospital were unharmed, though parts of it, including the scanning room, were demolished. Grayson said afterwards: "If I ever see that image again I'd be the first out of the building."

              The Soviets set out to map the conductivity of the earth's crust in an area of seismic activity in Tajikistan. Their experiments, carried out in the 1970s, involved firing massive charges of electricity into the earth. There were tremors but nobody paid much attention. In 1993, Nikolai Tarasov of the institute of earth physics in Moscow analysed data from the trials and found something remarkable.

              The electromagnetic pulses from the experiment were followed by tremors, each one releasing up to a million times as much energy as the pulse that preceded it. Tarasov went on to look at the results of similar experiments carried out at Tien Shan in the 1980s, and found that two-thirds were also followed by tremors. Tarasov is now part of a team being funded by the EU to investigate how electricity can cause earthquakes.

              The pressure of the fluid injected into the well is thought to have made it easier for rock to slip along the fault lines. Electrically heating the water might have a similar effect. Other theories focus on the rocks themselves. Many minerals are piezoelectric, which means that when they are put under pressure, as in a fault zone, they can produce an electric potential.

              It also means that when electricity is applied they vibrate slightly. An electric pulse could set a large mass of rock vibrating, enough perhaps to start slippage and trigger an earthquake. Although the underlying physical principles may not be understood, the implications are literally earth-shattering. We now have a relatively simple and easy means of inducing earthquakes.

              "Chance has put in our way a most singular and whimsical problem, and its solution is its own reward." -Sherlock Holmes

              by The Anomaly on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 06:23:36 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

  •  This "black budget" stuff... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    The Anomaly

    ...gives me the creeps.

    I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

    by Rex Manning on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 10:37:57 PM PST

  •  I've been to HAARP. It's a completely (5+ / 0-)

    ...non-classified environment, open to tours by the public.

    The likelihood that it could be used for weather modification and mind control are the stuff of the tinfoil hat brigade, IMO.

    As far as Begich:

    One of the most vocal critics of HAARP is Nick Begich, son of the late Alaskan congressman of the same name. He writes as Dr. Nick Begich, but his Ph.D. is in traditional medicine and was purchased via mail from the unaccredited Open International University in India, and included no coursework or curriculum. Begich is a proponent of a number of new age energy healing techniques of his own invention. In 1995 he self-published Angels Don't Play This HAARP. This book kick-started many of the popular rumors about HAARP, including that mass mind control is one of its goals.

    The guy's a loon.

    The full story from which this quote was taken can be found at:

    HAARP Myths

    "Certainly the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you; if you don't bet, you can't win." Lazurus Long

    by rfall on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 11:04:24 PM PST

    •  OK. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Matrix Dweller

      Then what type of equipment, using electromagnetic waves, could be used for weather modification for instance?

      Or setting off earthquakes?

      Or triggering volcanoes?

      If not something like HAARP then what?

      I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

      by Rex Manning on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 11:20:14 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Simple answer to all your questions: (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Norbrook, badaspie

        Nothing, nothing, nothing and...nothing!

        Why do you ask?

        "Certainly the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you; if you don't bet, you can't win." Lazurus Long

        by rfall on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 11:29:09 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Nothing? (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Matrix Dweller

          Then why, in the late 1990's did a top US official acknowledge that some countries were working on exactly that type of technology?

          Why would a top US official even mention it if it wasn't something that was plausible or indeed operational?

          I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

          by Rex Manning on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 11:35:35 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Why, indeed? (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            badaspie

            Let's see:

            - Cuz he's nuts.

            - Cuz he thinks what's he's saying is true, but he's wrong.

            - Cuz it's an attempt at disinformation.

            - Cuz he doesn't actually exist.

            So, who is this "top US official" who made this amazing revelation in the 1990s? Perhaps if you tell me, I can provide a more focused answer.

            Until then, I have to balance the science we know against any one of these possibilities.

            "Certainly the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you; if you don't bet, you can't win." Lazurus Long

            by rfall on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 11:43:30 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Secretary of Defense... (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              antirove, Matrix Dweller

              ...under Bill Clinton, William Cohen.

              From the 'Federation of American Scientists' website:

              Terrorism, Weapons of Mass Destruction, and U.S. Strategy Sam Nunn Policy Forum April 28, 1997 University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia.

              Question to William Cohen:

              Q: Let me ask you specifically about last week's scare here in
              Washington, and what we might have learned from how prepared we are to
              deal with that (inaudible), at B'nai Brith.

              A:
              snip....

              There are some
              reports, for example, that some countries have been trying to
              construct something like an Ebola Virus, and that would be a very
              dangerous phenomenon, to say the least.

              Alvin Toeffler has written
              about this in terms of some scientists in their laboratories trying to
              devise certain types of pathogens that would be ethnic-specific so
              that they could just eliminate certain ethnic groups and races; and
              others are designing some sort of engineering, some sort of insects
              that can destroy specific crops.

              Others are engaging even in an eco-type of terrorism whereby they can alter the climate, set off
              earthquakes, volcanoes remotely through the use of electromagnetic waves.

              So there are plenty of ingenious minds out there that are at work
              finding ways in which they can wreak terror upon other nations. It's
              real
              , and that's the reason why we have to intensify our efforts, and
              that's why this is so important.

              Also one might wonder why the UN went to the trouble, in 1976, of banning the development and use of weather weapons if such weapons were not perceived as a genuine and plausible threat:

              UN Weather Weapons Treaty,  CONVENTION ON THE PROHIBITION OF MILITARY OR ANY OTHER HOSTILE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MODIFICATION TECHNIQUES

              I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

              by Rex Manning on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 12:00:21 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  This is the best you can do? (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                oaktownadam, badaspie

                A one paragraph section of a long report, and one in which the responder offers a list of possibilities, what ifs, and speculations?

                And note that the "it's real" could refer to the previous sentence about "ingenious minds at work" on a range of terror weapons, or the prior paragraph.

                And, I note that you dropped the preceding part of his answer:

                The same thing is true about just the false scare of a threat of using some kind of a chemical weapon or a biological one.

                Seems to me that this sets up what follows as a possible list of "false threats".

                Bottom line, it's hard to tell from a transcript of an interview exactly what we intended--the interviewee cuts off sentences, jumps around, etc.  Is there a government report somewhere that makes similar claims?

                Moving on:

                Also one might wonder why the UN went to the trouble, in 1976, of banning the development and use of weather weapons if such weapons were not perceived as a genuine and plausible threat

                Wonderful way you have there of cleverly changing the goalposts.  First, you ask me about how electromagnetic waves could be used to trigger weather modifications, among other things.  I say they can't.

                Then, with this statement, you open the door wider to any sort of weather modification abilities, no matter how they're accomplished.

                So, let's try this:  techniques already exist for modifying weather in limited ways over limited areas with limited success.  Cloud seeding is one such way.  I would guess the U.N. knew that at the time, and foresaw possible military applications, and were concerned.

                Without being an expert, I would guess that the U.N. was trying to do what the U.N. is supposed to do:  in advance of possible development and use of weapons of war, they want to put restrictions on their use.  The U.N. doesn't know how such weapons would work, or even if they could work--it's easy to just say "don't do this" and move on.

                A U.N. resolution, I might add, is not a statement of science, and shouldn't be treated as one.

                So, how have you yet proved that HAARP, or any similar use of electromagnetic waves, can set off earthquakes, trigger volcanoes, or modify weather?

                "Certainly the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you; if you don't bet, you can't win." Lazurus Long

                by rfall on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 12:18:06 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  You're flailing. (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Matrix Dweller

                  I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

                  by Rex Manning on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 12:20:16 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Oh, I see, when you can't answer, claim that (2+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    oaktownadam, badaspie

                    ...I'm flailing.

                    Peachy.

                    BTW, unlike you, apparently, I took the time to read the U.N. treaty you cited.  You apparently missed this in the preamble:

                    Recognizing that scientific and technical advances may open new possibilities with respect to
                    modification of the environment,  
                    Recalling the Declaration of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment,
                    adopted at Stockholm on 16 June 1972,  
                    Realizing that the use of environmental modification techniques for peaceful purposes could
                    improve the interrelationship of man and nature and contribute to the preservation and
                    improvement of the environment for the benefit of present and future generations,  
                    Recognizing, however, that military or any other hostile use of such techniques could have
                    effects extremely harmful to human welfare,  

                    Note that this doesn't have anything to say about electromagnetic waves and so on.  Just general references to "environmental modification techniques".  And sounding somewhat speculative, at that.

                    And in Article II:

                    As used in article 1, the term "environmental modification techniques" refers to any technique
                    for changing - through the deliberate manipulation of natural processes--the dynamics,
                    composition or structure of the Earth, including its biota, lithosphere, hydrosphere and
                    atmosphere, or of outer space.

                    Pretty wide ranging net there--and so not a bad idea--but again, what support does this provide for your view about HAARP?

                    You've provided zero evidence, only speculation, and you tell my I'm flailing.

                    You're failing....

                    "Certainly the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you; if you don't bet, you can't win." Lazurus Long

                    by rfall on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 12:26:38 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Ha! (0+ / 0-)

                      what support does this provide for your view about HAARP?

                      What is my "view" about HAARP?

                      I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

                      by Rex Manning on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 12:31:04 AM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Oh for crying out loud! (2+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        oaktownadam, badaspie

                        You said:

                        Then what type of equipment, using electromagnetic waves, could be used for weather modification for instance?

                        Or setting off earthquakes?

                        Or triggering volcanoes?

                        If not something like HAARP then what?

                        I said:

                        Nothing, nothing, nothing and...nothing!

                        You dispute this, I believe, based on your followup comments:

                        Then why, in the late 1990's did a top US official acknowledge that some countries were working on exactly that type of technology?

                        Why would a top US official even mention it if it wasn't something that was plausible or indeed operational?

                        Ok, then:

                        Please provide proof that any form of electromagnetic waves could be used for weather modification, setting off earthquakes, or triggering volcanoes.

                        If you can't do that, then you're are likely nothing more than a conspiracy theorist or a troll, and I have no time for either.

                        If you can, I'll gladly continue the discussion.

                        "Certainly the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you; if you don't bet, you can't win." Lazurus Long

                        by rfall on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 12:42:01 AM PST

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  No. (1+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          Matrix Dweller

                          Please provide proof that any form of electromagnetic waves could be used for weather modification, setting off earthquakes, or triggering volcanoes.

                          I never said it could. But I provided at least one quote from a US defense secretary who said it could.

                          That aside, the burden is on you.

                          Please provide proof that any form of electromagnetic waves CAN'T be used for weather modification, setting off earthquakes, or triggering volcanoes.

                          If you can't then you're kinda just making sh*t up as you go along aren't you?

                          I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

                          by Rex Manning on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 12:51:23 AM PST

                          [ Parent ]

                          •  You are really unbelievable (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            oaktownadam

                            I never said it could. But I provided at least one quote from a US defense secretary who said it could.

                            Well, that sure makes it true, doesn't it, when a US defense secretary says it.  Scientists everywhere will be surprised.

                            Please provide proof that any form of electromagnetic waves CAN'T be used for weather modification, setting off earthquakes, or triggering volcanoes.

                            Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof, and yours is the extraordinary claim, not mine.  Show me something in the published science literature which supports any claims about modifying weather, creating earthquakes or triggering volcanoes with electromagnetic waves.  One will do.

                            You know, I notice that you've made no statements yourself about what is and isn't possible, what can or can't be done--just quoted others and said "but I didn't say it".  Classic conspiracy nut or troll, I can't tell which.

                            Why can't you take a clear stand, make a clear statement?

                            Prove me wrong by making one definitive statement about what you think electromagnetic waves can do to the weather or volcanoes or earthquakes.  Without that, I have no further interest in engaging with you.

                            "Certainly the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you; if you don't bet, you can't win." Lazurus Long

                            by rfall on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 01:04:52 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  You're flailing again. (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            Matrix Dweller

                            Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof, and yours is the extraordinary claim.

                            No, I never made a claim. Go back and look.

                            Show me something in the published science literature which supports any claims about modifying weather, creating earthquakes or triggering volcanoes with electromagnetic waves.

                            Show me one that supports any claims against modifying weather, creating earthquakes or triggering volcanoes with electromagnetic waves.

                            You know, I notice that you've made no statements yourself about what is and isn't possible, what can or can't be done--just quoted others and said "but I didn't say it".  Classic conspiracy nut or troll, I can't tell which.

                            You noticed?! Good for you! See, I'm someone with an open mind who doesn't reject or accept something out of hand. I listen, I observe and I challenge. You can't handle that can you! You have an agenda and I am a threat to you because I don't accept your agenda.

                            That's why you started calling me names. "Conspiracy nut"! HA! Please provide a scientific definition for that. A "troll"? Too predictable.

                            Why can't you take a clear stand, make a clear statement?

                            Like what?

                            Without that, I have no further interest in engaging with you.

                            Hell, we're not even going steady yet and you're already talking about engagement?! Slow down! I'm swooning.

                            I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

                            by Rex Manning on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 01:29:16 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                        •  Eastlund has researched mesocyclone manipulation (0+ / 0-)

                          using EM radiation.

                          In September [2005], Eastland filed a patent on a way to create artificial ionized plasma patterns with megawatts of power using inexpensive microwave power sources. This all-weather technique, he noted, can be used to heat specific regions of the atmosphere.

                          Eastlund's research is tuned to artificial generation of acoustic and gravitational waves in the atmosphere. The heating of steering winds to help shove around mesocyclones and hurricanes, as well as controlling electrical conductivity of the atmosphere is also on his investigative agenda.

                          "In my opinion, the new technology for use of artificial plasma layers in the atmosphere: as heater elements to modify steering winds, as a modifier of electrostatic potential to influence lightning distribution, and for generation of acoustic and gravitational waves, could ultimately provide a core technology for a science of severe weather modification," Eastlund told Space.com.

                          After about 5 years of such research, and further development of weather codes, a pilot experiment to modify the steering winds of a mesocylone might be safely attempted. Such an experiment would probably require 50 to 100 megawatts...

                          "Chance has put in our way a most singular and whimsical problem, and its solution is its own reward." -Sherlock Holmes

                          by The Anomaly on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 08:18:06 AM PST

                          [ Parent ]

          •  "working on" (0+ / 0-)

            has absolutely nothing to do with it actually being possible.

            Notice that the CIA "worked on" truth serums and mind control drugs for many years, and did not succeed.

            DARPA spends money on long shot ideas, with the understanding that many of them probably won't amount to anything.

            •  And DARPA... (3+ / 0-)

              ...spends money on projects that do work and they end up being classified top secret.

              To say that a military or intelligence agency spends money on projects that fail doesn't mean that all their projects fail does it?

              Anyway, if you research MKULTRA for instance you will find that CIA mind control operations were extremely successful and proved usefull.

              I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

              by Rex Manning on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 01:48:26 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  That's right Rex (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Rex Manning, Dirtandiron

                and they are still useful today--and classified.

                The dead might as well try to speak to the living, as the old to the young - Willa Cather

                by Matrix Dweller on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 02:28:44 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

              •  you're making a logical leap (0+ / 0-)

                It's true, DARPA probably wouldn't continue funding a project that wasn't producing some sort of results.

                However, you're assuming that HAARP is a weather-control system, which is a logical leap not supported by any facts.

                It's true that the Air Force, among others, has worked on, and probably still is working on, weather control systems. But that doesn't mean that HAARP is it, nor does it mean that weather control is even possible.

              •  and no, MKULTRA was not a success (0+ / 0-)

                It produced nothing except a lot of human wreckage along the way.

                Sorry, LSD is just not a very good mind control drug.

            •  I'm sure you're right for the most part, (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Rex Manning, Dirtandiron, oaktownadam

              but DARPA would not have funded this project, begun in 1993, only to scrap it because they were too shortsighted to see that it wouldn't amount to anything.  It has amounted to something, or it wouldn't still be in operation.

              The dead might as well try to speak to the living, as the old to the young - Willa Cather

              by Matrix Dweller on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 02:27:34 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  Something like HAARP (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Rex Manning

        only far more powerful.  About 10 full scale nuclear power plants connected to a similar facility could work.

        •  Pray tell, what science supports the assertion (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          oaktownadam, badaspie

          ...that if HAARP beamed energy at even a million times its current output it could cause earthquakes?  Trigger volcanoes?  Affect the weather?

          Any sources you can provide for these claims?

          "Certainly the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you; if you don't bet, you can't win." Lazurus Long

          by rfall on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 11:55:20 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I hear the sound of crickets...what a surprise! (0+ / 0-)

            "Certainly the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you; if you don't bet, you can't win." Lazurus Long

            by rfall on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 12:42:37 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  Research on taming tornadoes through EM pulsing (0+ / 0-)

            Scientists have suggested that EM pulsing can mitigate the forces at the center of a tornado.

            The proposal calls for beaming microwave energy into the cold, rainy downdraft of a thunderstorm where a tornado could originate. That pulse of power would disrupt the convective flow needed to concentrate energy that forms a tornado, said Bernard Eastlund, president of Eastlund Scientific Enterprises Corp, based in San Diego, California.

            "We call it taming the tornado," Jenkins said. "With just a little burst of microwave energy, we think we see a way to negate the trigger point in tornado creation. We want to heat the cold rain. By tailoring the beam, it can absorb the rain that is part of the tornado-making process." But is it nice to fool with Mother Nature? "This is a new science were talking about of weather modification...a new paradigm which seeks to mitigate these violent weather systems," Eastlund said.

            Eastlund has looked at data provided by the Advanced Regional Prediction System at the Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms Center at the University of Oklahoma.

            These numerical simulation data were used to study the formation of conditions suitable for "tornado-genesis." And he and Jenkins used them to see the effects of zapping an incipient storm with electromagnetic radiation beamed from a proposed Thunderstorm Solar Power Satellite.

            "You cant wave your hands about this idea," Eastlund said. "Youve got to use real numerical modeling. My research shows that by heating the falling rain, we can turn off the downdraft that drives a tornado." More research is needed, he said, to further determine just how much energy would yield a knockout punch to a tornado on the brew.

            The flip side of this research is that the EM radiation could be focused on the warm front to increase the wind shear and thus force of the tornado.

            "Chance has put in our way a most singular and whimsical problem, and its solution is its own reward." -Sherlock Holmes

            by The Anomaly on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 07:59:47 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  Oooooh! Skeptoid! That's a reliable souce! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Matrix Dweller

      Never heard of it.

      He writes as Dr. Nick Begich, but his Ph.D. is in traditional medicine and was purchased via mail from the unaccredited Open International University in India, and included no coursework or curriculum.

      Notice there's no reference for their claim that he has a mail order degree? Did you catch that?

      Let's try this.:

      The eldest son, Dr. Nick Begich, Jr., is well known in Alaska for his own political activities. He was twice elected President of both the Alaska Federation of Teachers and the Anchorage Council of Education. Nick Jr.'s current research focuses on the methods, actions, and ethics of various US government organizations.

      Do state teacher federations and city education councils routinely elect mail order academics as their president?

      Hmmmm....I smell desperation in your quest to discredit the fellow.

      I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

      by Rex Manning on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 01:15:11 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

        •  That site... (0+ / 0-)

          ...almost broke my browser!

          You'd think a fake degree site would have a good fake HTML programmer :)

          I didn't see anything at either of your links about Begich though.

          Could you please point me to the exact reference?

          Thanks.

          I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

          by Rex Manning on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 01:33:01 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Odd source (0+ / 0-)

            I normally wouldn't consider Coast to Coast AM a reputable source, but they seem quite proud of Begich's background.  Here's their bio.

            Key quote:

            Begich received his doctorate in traditional medicine from The Open International University for Complementary Medicines in November 1994.

            •  Thinking about it... (0+ / 0-)

              ...are there accredited universities that offer degrees in "complementary medicine"?

              I think that's probably outside the realm of orthodox academic training.

              His "complementary medicine" PHd doesn't mean he doesn't have traditional academic training from accredited institutions too.

              Nor does it mean his research or conclusions about HAARP, for instance, are not correct or on the right track.

              I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

              by Rex Manning on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 01:58:49 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  The problem I have (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Rex Manning

                with Begich's position is that he doesn't offer a mechanism by which electromagnetic waves can do any of the things he claims.  Although such claims are made in the original patent, they prove nothing.  Perpetual-motion machines have been patented, and their inventors undoubtedly made claims as well.

                •  I don't think... (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Matrix Dweller

                  ...the US patent office allows patents for perpetual motion machines.

                  The patent office is pretty strict about what they allow. I know that from personal experience.

                  As for his claims, if what he claims exists has elements that are top secret, then he certainly wouldn't have access to all the elements for an operational system.

                  I find his claims to be interesting though, perhaps plausible too and there is corroborating, circumstantial evidence such as the UN treaty against weather weapons and Secretary Cohen's comments about countries developing weather weapons using electromagnetic forces.

                  I'd like to see a glasnost type opening of US advanced weapons projects to public scrutiny so we could see if such technology exists or doesn't. Even if it was narrowed to weather and seismic weapons we would know either way.

                  I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

                  by Rex Manning on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 02:20:32 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                •  as I recall, there's a short list of (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Rex Manning

                  inventions for which the USPTO demands that a working model be available. That list includes perpetual motion machines and anti-gravity devices. That's all I really can say, I've never had occasion to file a patent app on anything in the "impossible" category.

                  Looking for intelligent energy policy alternatives? Try here.

                  by alizard on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 02:52:09 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

      •  "source!" (0+ / 0-)

        Damn.

        I must have been thinking about sauce.

        I'm lost..I'm angry..and I'm armed!>>Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

        by Rex Manning on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 01:34:25 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  NTSA. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rfall

    Not This Shit Again.

    Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

    by crose on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 11:11:46 PM PST

  •  Wow, I think Bushco already used this! (4+ / 0-)

    one could develop a system that would seriously impair the brain performance of very large populations in selected regions over an extended period'

    That certainly explains how Bush was President for eight years ....

    William Casey "We will know that we have succeeded when everything the public believes is false"

    by Inky99 on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 11:16:15 PM PST

  •  HAARP has been around a while (0+ / 0-)

    and been in use long before it was declared a finished project.  I believe it is based on the work of Nikola Tesla, but I am not sure if there is any reliable documentation for that.

    It's called an "ionospheric research instrument". Excuse me if I think that something that cost millions (can't find an estimate), generates 3.6 million watts of power, and is managed by DARPA is not totally above-board and harmless.  

    The ionosphere is what protects our planet from the sun's radiation.  What need is there to study it, unless it is for studying what happens when it is disrupted?

    So what it if is open to the public for tours?  It's too big to hide, and the best place to hide something is right out in the open, where everyone can see it.

    Shame on those of you who are making fun of the diarist because you do not understand the subject.

     

    The dead might as well try to speak to the living, as the old to the young - Willa Cather

    by Matrix Dweller on Wed Jan 28, 2009 at 01:59:07 AM PST

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