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Update [2009-4-26 15:56:19 by DemFromCT]:: CQ Politics has the WH transcript from today's briefing.C-SPAN has the video.

Swine flu news continues to catch people's attention. There are suspect cases in Israel, NZ (confirmed), Spain and France that were airline travelers from Mexico (KS and NYC has similar cases, both now confirmed.) The news hounds at Flu Wiki have all the up-to-date news. Official information from CDC is here (20 confirmed cases in 5 states  - CA, TX, OH, NY, KS.) There will be a CDC media briefing today preceded by a just-concluded WH briefing with the "team" (DHS and CDC).

Note that we don't have an HHS secretary yet, something that the Senate needs to address immediately.

A routine step :public health emergency in the US: has been taken. That frees up meds from the Strategic National Stockpile to be pre-positioned in states like Texas (where there are confirmed cases, and a request for meds from the Governor.) This is exactly what they should be doing. Kudos to CDC for doing what's needed, acting aggressively, and communicating with the public (and not waiting for the slowpokes at WHO.) And for those who wish to review the steps taken in a disaster or emergency, see the previous posts on National Response Framework.

Note also that NYC is NOT seeing an uptick of cases that appear to be flu (influenza-like illness.) That's an important observation by the NYC DOH. But we can expect a rise of cases, and in any state, not just known ones. The fact that this tails into seasonal flu makes surveillance and looking for influenza-like illness that much more difficult.

Yesterday's CDC media avail is here; revamped interim guidance on masks is here.

Site Note: A superb Daily Kos diary [and discussion] on flu and evolutionary biology by MrMichaelMTis here [but check Hood23's comments]. Please lose the conspiracy theories, a bannable offense.

This remains a "evolving" situation, but for now simply a unique outbreak that is getting the attention it deserves. This instructional video will set you straight as to how to cough.

And for those of you who haven't done so, take a look at some of the steps you can take to prepare for a flu outbreak, which may yet come to a town near you.

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 10:40 AM PDT.

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Comment Preferences

  •  CONFIRMED! Why the excitement? This is scary NT (3+ / 0-)
  •  over at flu wiki (19+ / 0-)

    we're getting interest from all over the world.

    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

    by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 10:47:41 AM PDT

  •  Really, really great post DemFromCT (16+ / 0-)

    and very helpful to those of us whose job it is to inform the local public.

    I am preparing an alert to send out locally via listserve and this is by far, the most useful post I have seen anywhere. Not over-reactive and all the information and needed links in one place.

    Thank you so much for a wonderful public service!!!

  •  Thank, DemfromCt, (9+ / 0-)

    for REAL information, instead of the CT studded stuff some are peddling.

    Senator Reid, schedule a vote on Sebelius for Tuesday.

    They waterboarded in order to "prove" the link between 9/11 and Saddam. That is the Unified Field Theory of Evil

    by Its the Supreme Court Stupid on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 10:48:37 AM PDT

  •  Great video (5+ / 0-)

    They do not address the option of sneezing into other people's fabrics though.

  •  We don't have an HHS secretary (33+ / 0-)

    because Michael Steele, the lame-duck chairman of the RNC, and Republicans in the Senate are pandering to right-to-lifers over Governor Sebelius's stance on abortion.

    Evidently they've learned nothing from the Terri Schiavo fiasco.

    "Whenever I can, I always watch the Detroit Tigers on the radio."--President Gerald Ford.

    by Dump Terry McAuliffe on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 10:51:06 AM PDT

  •  swine flu: take that vaccines (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kanuk, ZenTrainer

    nature will always create new viruses which is why building up our natural immunities and building up our health through more healthful lifestyles always has been and always will be the only solution.

    Quotations are useful in periods of ignorance or obscurantist beliefs.

    by simon551 on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 10:51:13 AM PDT

    •  LOL (15+ / 0-)

      worked real well in 1918, huh. 50 million dead, predominance of young adults.

      I'm all for healthy lifestyles (a great idea for any one of a bazillion reasons) but don't stick your head in the sand if medicine or vaccine can help out of stubborn conviction.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 10:54:40 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well people in 1918 weren't healthier. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        simon551, happynz

        For one there was a World War.  

      •  Isn't there a case to be made... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        dianem, freakofsociety

        That the close proximity of millions of young soldiers in the trenches of Europe allowed a more virulent form to develop?

      •  more vaccines just lead to more vaccines (4+ / 0-)

        when I was a kid chicken-pox and the flu were part of life. now it's a public outcry. I'm not sticking my head in the sand but I'm not relying on the goodness of big pharma to solve all of my problems either.

        Quotations are useful in periods of ignorance or obscurantist beliefs.

        by simon551 on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:02:41 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Do you remember polio? (16+ / 0-)

          Or whooping cough?  

          Do you know what adult-onset measles or mumps can do to humans?  

          Apparently not, or you wouldn't be touting the "all-natural", anti-vaccine party line.

           

          Their cause, if they had one, is nothing to them now. They hate for hate's sake. (W.H. Auden)

          by dotalbon on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:09:11 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  or smallpox (11+ / 0-)

            Which killed and maimed millions of people around the world, for centuries?

          •  adult onset measles more than not is after being (0+ / 0-)

            vaccinated

            Quotations are useful in periods of ignorance or obscurantist beliefs.

            by simon551 on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:32:43 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  After being exposed to someone who wasn't (4+ / 0-)

              A certain number of people can't be vaccinated, or the vaccination simply doesn't work. That's okay, since as long as most people are vaccinated a disease can't take hold. But a lot of parents are assuming that since everybody else is vaccinated they don't need to put their child through the perceived risk of vaccination, which means that vaccination is no longer reaching the critical number where a disease can't take hold.

              •  yes - herd immunity (8+ / 0-)

                Something that people don't understand too well.  An immunization won't turn you into some kind of disease-proof superman.  You still may get sick, though you're less likely too.

                But vaccinations aren't just for protecting individuals - they're for protecting the population at large, and that's key part of their efficacy.  If everyone is less susceptible to the disease, then everyone's less likely to get the disease because the odds of encountering an infected person are far lower.

          •  Whooping cough is still around (0+ / 0-)

            and IT'S NOT DEADLY!!!! It is VERY VERY rare to die from whooping cough, period.

            My husband had it (despite being fully vaccinated) and while it sucked balls it didn't even warrant hospitalization.

            Polio and small pox are horrible deadly diseases and it's wonderful that vaccines have eliminated them.

            The flu and chicken pox aren't horrible deadly diseases, but for the vast majority minor annoyances. Obviously with all things exceptions exist (the immunocompromised, for example) but conflating a contagious rash that most children get to a disease used for genocide is just dishonest.

            •  Polio is still around (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              forester, paxpdx, fernan47

              The only reason it is not prevalent in the US is that people are vaccinated.  This, at the heart of things, is why the anti-vax folks are dangerous, ignorant, and selfish.  

              An open mind gets filled with crap.

              by Empty Vessel on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:20:45 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  A baby died in Oregon a few weeks ago (9+ / 0-)

              ... of whooping cough. Too young to be immunized, infected by an older kid of white progressive liberals who are anti-vax.

              Many of my friends & colleagues do not vaccinate their children. Oregon is rapidly becoming one of the least-vaccinated states in the country - not because of rural anti-government types (the stereotype), but because of Volvo-driving liberals (I have a Volvo, I'll claim that label) who don't want their precious offspring to get those nasty shots.

              Whooping cough is going to be common here soon. Chicken pox can kill adults. And how do you know if you're around someone who's immunocompromised?

              "I like to go into Marshall Field's in Chicago just to see all the things there are in the world that I do not want." M. Madeleva, C.S.C.

              by paxpdx on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:23:22 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Most "volvo-driving liberals" (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                simon551

                (I'm a saturn-driving liberal) don't trust the fact that the number of vaccines has skyrocketed in the past generation and that we have far more than any other country. Compare our schedule to that of Japan's, for instance.

                Moreover, the constant conflating of all vaccine preventable diseases as the most horrible illness you could ever get and will kill bajillions of people when, seriously, chicken pox, degrades the rhetoric and the pro-vax argument.

                Lastly, there are more than 2 sides to this. Many people, myself included, have looked at the prevalence of each disease, the risk of each disease, the risk of the vaccines (and vaccines have risks), the benefit of vaccines with their limited immunity vs. the full immunity of catching and getting over the disease, and the increasing tempo of vaccinations in the past 20 years and make a decision that's best for their family. There's a vast gray area between 0 shots and every shot you possibly can.

                When was your last DTaP booster? MMR? Polio?

                •  a (4+ / 0-)

                  If you are not vaccinated then you are a free-rider. A parasite on society. You are harming others as well as yourself by detracting from herd immunity. Not content on just that amount of harm, anti-vaxxers are frequently proselytizers as well, attempting to multiply the harm they cause.

                  My Tdap, assuming that is what you meant, was 2 months ago.
                  I get the influenza shot yearly.
                  Hep B was prior to med school.
                  Rubeola, mumps, rubella, and varicella, at the same time. Do not remember which of these were titer exemptions.
                  Why are you asking about polio? Is someone suggesting polio boosters?

                  The plural of anecdote is not data.

                  by Skipbidder on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 03:20:52 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                •  I guess I just have a broader interpretation... (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Skipbidder, Leap Year

                  ... of "family".

                  My family isn't just myself and my child, or even our close friends and family (who include a few people with HIV, and my mom, who died last year after >20 years of severe illness related to cancer and MS).

                  I don't know much at all about the baby who died of whooping cough in Oregon, other than that its parents were low-income - they were patients at a county health clinic. I do know that its parents mourned no less than I would if my child had died in infancy - or anytime. And if my child died because others around were too selfish to take a precaution that would protect him, I'd be pretty damned angry, too.

                  "I like to go into Marshall Field's in Chicago just to see all the things there are in the world that I do not want." M. Madeleva, C.S.C.

                  by paxpdx on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 03:22:03 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                •  Oh - and my shots... (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  mariachi mama, Pizzapotamus

                  Are ridiculously up to date. My mom (RIP 10/2008) lived for >25 years with several comorbid diseases resulting in her being severely immunocompromised. I came out right around the time gay men began dying, and lost a friend to GRID ('gay related immune dysfunction') in the early 1980s, before HIV/AIDS were so named. I assume I'm surrounded by people whose lives matter no less than my own, and that perhaps I might take extremely slight risks to help minimize greater ones for them.

                  I'm also blessed with a fabulous job that 1) sends me traveling pretty regularly, including to Mexico and Spain in the past year, and 2) provides wonderful health insurance, including 100% vaccine coverage. So yes - I consider it a bit of an obligation to stay 100% current on all vaccines, and with my travel, it's one of the conditions of my employment, too.

                  "I like to go into Marshall Field's in Chicago just to see all the things there are in the world that I do not want." M. Madeleva, C.S.C.

                  by paxpdx on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 03:35:01 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

              •  Let me square a couple of things here... (0+ / 0-)
                1. Someone who does not vaccinate is not liberal. They are mis-educated idiots trying to best the doctor. They don't understand bacteria and they don't understand viruses. Otherwise they would vaccinate 100%. 99% doesn't cut it, and missing some people creates a niche where grows a superbug.
                1. The corporatists nailed Marshall Field's. It is currently a Macy's, and it is in danger of being closed and maybe turned into a leaf green condominium development. The other traditional place was Carson's. It's now a mish mosh of nothing.

                Volvo? what's your point? Any different from a Hummer H3, Lincoln Bloviator? Both are idiots who think then THEY won't get hurt in an accident.

                Non-vaccinating, Volvos, Suburbs, Hummers, Home-schooling, all are wall against the unwashed.

                Remember Edgar Allen Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death".

                Ugh. --UB.

                •  Hey, hey... (0+ / 0-)

                  Did you read my post? Yes, I'm one of those VDLs - but my car drives me and my kid to the doctor at every freaking opportunity to get whatever immunizations we can to maintain others' health. That's somewhat countercultural in the social circles in which we (tangentially) travel up here in Oregon, where the "progressive" thing to do is to be anti-vax.

                  (Oh, and I drive a cheap S40 - compromise between safety on the road with SUVs surrounding me on my ridiculous commute to work, with pretty decent fuel efficiency.)

                  No - I'm infuriated by people who call themselves progressive yet don't think of the effect their decisions to not vaccinate have on others.

                  (And I miss Marshall Field's. And Meier & Frank, here in Portland, which was also eaten up by Macy's. I didn't shop at either - I'm not a big shopper - but really hate seeing local names with history behind them be eaten by the homogenizing corporate conglomerate. Just sayin'...)

                  If there's a vaccine for H1N1-current strain that comes out, we'll get it. Not necessarily so much for ourselves, even, as for those who can't or don't or won't.

                  "I like to go into Marshall Field's in Chicago just to see all the things there are in the world that I do not want." M. Madeleva, C.S.C.

                  by paxpdx on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 07:38:46 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

            •  pardon me but that's wrong about whooping cough (9+ / 0-)

              adults get an annoying cough, but babies die and/or get hospitalized. That is a medical fact. I spend too much time treating these kids.

              The vaccine is not 100% protective, but telling a parent there's not much you can do is horrible.

              chicken pox is potentially difficult for adults. Swine flu can kill (see mexico) but even seasonal flu is associated with 36K deaths a year.

              "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

              by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:43:52 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Even if you're fully vaxed (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                happynz

                a baby isn't immune to whooping cough until their 4th DTaP shot, around 8 months usually. There's some wearing off of the vaccine around 10-12 years of age, which is why it is not uncommon for someone to contract it then, before they get their DTaP booster. This is what happened to my husband.

                You're making the very wrong assumption that I'm opposed to vaccines. That said, it annoys me to all hell that people think that every single vaccine preventable disease is as horrible as small pox.

                Seasonal flu and swine flu are not the same thing by any stretch of the imagination.

                The chicken pox vaccine is nowhere near as effective as simply catching chicken pox as a child. Personally, if my kid doesn't catch it by 10, I'd get her vaccinated because it is more serious as an adult. But I honestly hope she gets it around 3, because it's not a big deal. Also, per the CDC, there is no intention whatsoever of eliminating the chicken pox.

                The flu vaccine is simply not effective. It does offer some protection to certain populations, but there are a bajillion strains of flu every year and most people I know who get the flu shot get the flu every year. I don't, and I haven't had a case of the flu for 7 years now, despite intimate contact with flu sufferers.

                Certain vaccines, like the MMR, actually spread the disease in the first few days. Pregnant women are encouraged to avoid recently vaccinated people because they will shed measles.

                Bottom line, vaccines are not a black and white issue, and the rhetoric on both sides has simply become stupid.

                •  it is hardly gray (3+ / 0-)

                  if it's not 100% white, it's 85% white (typical effectiveness).

                  The vax never makes you 100% pertussis proof, and both vax and natural illness generally wear off in about 10 years. But decreasing the prevalence in a community decreases exposure to babies.

                  I didn't say anything about vaccines, I said you're wrong to minimize (especially) whooping cough and the other illnesses, though the chicken pox vax is the most debatable..

                  "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                  by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:41:49 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  I'm not minimizing it (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    mbzoltan

                    most people believe whooping cough is as deadly and life destroying as polio or small pox when it simply isn't. It sucks, a lot, and it's not something I would want my child to have (and will be vaccinating her against), but for the vast majority you cough a ton and feel like shit for 3 months, and then you're immune for life.

                    Polio, small pox, and tetanus are horrible horrible diseases, all of which are either rare or totally gone from the west. Tetanus, in particular, is extremely hard to contract.

                    Pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella suck a lot and have a higher rate of complications, but are by and large not deadly.

                    Chicken pox, garden-variety influenza, rotavirus, most HPV varieties are, again by and large, short lived annoyances.

                    Due to the fact that it is almost impossible to get polio or any of the forms of hepatitis as a young child (the exceptions being traveling to polio-afflicted regions or if the mother has hepatitis), it's totally ridiculous to vaccinate young babies against it when you can just as easily and more effectively wait until they're like 6. And yet hepatitis B at birth, Hep A at 12 months, IPV at 2, 4, and 6 months, etc. etc. etc.

                    Most people don't research these diseases, the vaccine history, or the risk of complications from the vaccines (for instance the DPT shot is well known to cause seizures in small children, again per the CDC), and just follow whatever the doctor says without thinking. This is, in my opinion, as criminally wrong as refusing to vaccinate because it's the trendy thing to do.

                    •  a bit of misinformation mixed with lots of truth (4+ / 0-)

                      DPT shots can be associated rarely with seizures, less so with the newer acellular vaccines. Not a common thing, no matter how "well known". and you are still not getting and acknowledging that it's not all about death, it's about hospitalization and other morbidity... the younger you are, the worse it is to have whooping cough. That we dont see more death and hospitalization is precisely because we do immunize, and herd immunity works. BTW, natural pertussis does not immunize you for life. It's good for about 10 years, or so, and that's why adults will be boosted along with their tetanus shots from time to time.

                      It's good for every parent to 'do the research', I agree. very important. But that doesn't make your conclusions entirely correct.

                      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                      by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 03:20:57 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                •  Chicken pox is a big deal. So is whopping cough (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  mariachi mama, fernan47, Pizzapotamus

                  For the purpose of simplicity, let's leave out the misery of having chicken pox and the children (and adults) who do have complications.

                  Once a person has had chicken pox, the virus remains in their nervous system for the rest of their life. It can break out again at any time as what as known is "shingles."  I'm sure you've heard of shingles. Usually, this affects one nerve pathway (dermatome) and one of the symptoms is blisters along that dermatome. Another is fever and severe pain. However, shingles can break out along more than one nerve pathway, which was the case when I had shingles. Like most people, I had severe pain, fever and was in bed for a couple of weeks, even though I was diagnosed and took an antiviral soon after I became ill.  

                  I was lucky. Although I continued to have pain along the nerve pathways for a couple of months after the blisters disappeared, it eventually went away. Some people who get shingles have permanent, severe nerve pain for the rest of their lives.

                  This is really something you don't want your daughter to suffer through someday.  

                  Chicken pox can also cause lethal problems for fetuses, so you don't want your child to be the disease vector who transmits chicken pox to a pregnant woman, because people with chicken pox are most contagious before they know that they are sick.

                  My neighbors next door didn't not vaccinate their child against anything. When she was a toddler, she got whooping cough. Her case was so severe that she required hospitalization.  She developed pneumonia and was in the hospital for several days. In addition to the trauma to her and her parents, she developed respiratory problems that persisted well over a year.

                  I know that you want to do what is right for your daughter and also for the people with whom she comes in contact. I hope that you will let her benefit from vaccinations.

                  •  You're simply wrong about shingles (1+ / 1-)
                    Recommended by:
                    mbzoltan
                    Hidden by:
                    jxg

                    http://www.news-medical.net/...

                    Catching chicken pox prevents shingles; it's the vaccine and lower incidence of chicken pox that causes shingles.

                    "After a child has had varicella (chickenpox), the virus becomes dormant and can reactivate later in adulthood in a closely related disease called shingles--both caused by the same varicella-zoster virus (VZV). It has long been known that adults receive natural boosting from contact with children infected with chicken pox that helps prevent the reactivation of shingles."

                    For most people, chicken pox is 3 days to a week of itching and flu-like symptoms, and then you're done for life.

                    Vaccines also commonly cause short-lived misery, whether it's pain at the injection site, fever and malaise for a few days, repeated every 2 months at least for the first year of life and regularly throughout childhood. Not counting countless colds, flus, scrapes, stomach bugs, upset stomachs due to food, allergies, injuries, etc. etc. etc.

                    Life is a series of short lived miseries. The annoyance of having chicken pox for a week is hardly noteworthy.

                  •  I concur that you are wrong about shingles (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    Pizzapotamus

                    I've personally known at least 6 adults who developed shingles after having had chicken pox as children.

                    I can't stand true believers.

                    For every complex problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong. H.L. Mencken (1880-1956)

                    by ivorykeyer on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 06:45:22 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                •  I didn't have my son vaccinated (4+ / 0-)

                  ... for chicken pox. At least not at first. It was the first year of the vaccine, and I wanted to see if there were any unusual adverse events.

                  As we left the pediatrician's office, his dad turned to me. "Y'know, I'm not sure I ever had the chicken pox." We called his mom that night - she didn't remember him having it. At the doctor, they ran titres on his blood - nope. No immunity.

                  The first of two vaccine shots made him incredibly ill for a week - fevers, achiness, shakes. He's nver been so sick before, or since. His doctor ran a few tests, and said he was lucky - had the kid contracted chicken pox and given it to him, he could well have died of it.

                  We don't miss any other vaccines. I'm not willing to lock ourselves in our house, and therefore I treat anyone we come into contact with as potential people who could be injured by our inattentiveness.

                  The kid will get the meningitis vaccine this year, btw. It's recommended starting at 11. It's for him - but for other people's kids, too.

                  "I like to go into Marshall Field's in Chicago just to see all the things there are in the world that I do not want." M. Madeleva, C.S.C.

                  by paxpdx on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 03:26:20 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                •  My son became severely ill (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Pizzapotamus

                  with RSV and rotavirus, on different occasions. He was so sick that either could have killed him. After that experience, I wish there were more vaccines.

                  A few years later, despite being vaccinated, he caught whooping cough. He was miserable for some time, but it wasn't a huge deal. There was speculation that the vaccine made it milder, we'll never know. If he caught it as a weak infant, it would have been catastrophic.  

            •  bollocks (5+ / 0-)

              Pertussis remains one of the leading causes of vaccine-preventable deaths worldwide.

              Pre-vaccine, in the US, thousands of infants died each year from pertussis. CDC website report is 9000 deaths at peak disease. This is now down to fewer than 30 deaths per year.

              It is precisely because these are routine vaccines that the current number is so low.

              Just because one disease isn't as bad as another doesn't mean we shouldn't make an effort to alleviate the burdens of the lesser disease.

              As more and more anti-vaxxers convince parents to not vaccinate, we will continue so see a rise in cases of preventable disease.

              This is not just a personal freedom issue. These parents are not making health decisions that affect themselves. They are making health decisions that affect their children AND also many others in society.

              The plural of anecdote is not data.

              by Skipbidder on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 03:00:09 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  Normally 'the flu' is still part of (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dotalbon

          everyday human life. But, there are significantly different strains, and when something is a zoonosis there is such a greater risk. Normally diseases do not spread from species to species, the exceptions to this case can be particularly nasty.

          The advent of vaccines would rank near the top for increased human longevity and quality of life. Yeah, it's distributed by some amoral people but that doesn't diminish the unqualified good the product does.

          "Biden's tears did more for the equality Of the sexes than Palin's presence" - Leah Renna

          by edgeways on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:13:52 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  I think what we commonly refer (0+ / 0-)

          to as flu is not at all the Influenza of pandemics.  I have never had a flu vaccine myself but am not entirely opposed to the idea.

        •  Chicken pox almost killed my boss. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Old Gardener, fernan47

          He was 40 years old and his mother passed away;  the stress led to a bad case of chicken pox.  That, in turn, triggered a liver disease that ran in his family.  Fortunately, middle-aged moderate drinkers who work out and who have his condition were at the top of the transplant list.

          Less seriously, I caught it at 17.  Among other places, my scrotum was covered in lesions.  

          2009: Year of the Donkey. Let's not screw it up.

          by Yamaneko2 on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:04:55 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  The reaction to 1918 flu was very uninformed (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        kanuk, freakofsociety, FrugalGranny

        .... they knew a lot less then.

    •  Nature has yet... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dianem

      ...to recreate smallpox.

    •  Sad (5+ / 0-)

      Your source of science is a Playboy model and an un-funny comedian, right? L. Ron Hubbard, perhaps?

    •  This is why the anti-vax folks sound dumb (9+ / 0-)

      They don't understand either immunity or how vaccines work.  The H1N1 variant is new, no vaccine yet.  The flu vaccine has nothing to do with this.

      As for the people who have/may die, I am sure they will be happy to know they are helping to improve the quality of life for the rest of us.

      This is why building up our natural immunities and building up our health through more healthful lifestyles always has been and always will be the only solution.

      Health and lifestyle may not help, and more importantly, this is often difficult for the poor of the world.  

      Yours is a petty bourgeois attitude toward human life.  Sometimes I really hate the educated, liberal, middle class.  You simply don't get the idea that freedom of choice is a whole fucking lot easier if you are educated/and or wealthy.

      Take your healthful lifestyles and natural immunity and shove it up your ass.  

      An open mind gets filled with crap.

      by Empty Vessel on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:02:57 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thank you, yet again (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DemFromCT, marysz, dotalbon

    My husband works in security here in San Francisco.  He will be meeting with his field supes and discussing the problem.  They already take precautions like constant hand washing and they do have masks they can hand out if it becomes necessary.

    The smallest feline is a masterpiece. ~Leonardo Da Vinci~

    by FrugalGranny on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 10:52:19 AM PDT

  •  How many of the 81 deaths in Mexico... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    iowabosox, GN1927, freakofsociety
    Have been confirmed as Swine Flu? Have they done testing on all of them ? Or are they assuming any flu related death is Swine? Is it possible another virus is making this identification difficult?
  •  Canada now has confirmed cases. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    iowabosox, Old Gardener

    I would imagine in the next couple of days we will see more.

  •  Well hopefully, once this is over (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rlharry, trueblueliberal

    we can find out how, despite all of the preparations  and protocols that were being put forth as a result of  Avian Flu, a case like this could be held so closely by Mexico.

    And not to get too political on this, but is this the same Rick Perry that was talking about secession not two weeks ago, asking for vaccine from the CDC?  Um, Rick, you don't get that when you're an independant country unless its in the Foreign Aid bill.

    •  the opposite (8+ / 0-)

      we'll find out how well the preps for avian flu helped us move our ass on this milder cousin.

        Q: When did the NHRC increase its surveillance capabilities for influenza?

         Our expansion was largely a result of an initiative by the Department of Defense’s (DOD's) Global Emerging Infectious System to intensify pandemic surveillance as a result of the avian influenza (H5N1) crisis. NHRC augmented existing febrile respiratory illness surveillance programs in military recruit trainees and ship-board populations and expanded into dependent populations in San Diego. Also, in a collaborative effort with the CDC, we developed surveillance on the Southern California-Mexico border, which was enhanced this year to deepen surveillance and augment diagnostic training of our Mexican collaborators via funding from the Department of State’s Biosecurity Engagement Program.

      http://blogs.sciencemag.org/...

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 10:58:21 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Maybe the mortality is higher in Mexico City (11+ / 0-)

    ...because everyone's already in respiratory distress because of the pollution. And yes, I'm serious, just for once!

    Al que no le guste el caldo, le dan dos tazas.

    by Rich in PA on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 10:54:10 AM PDT

  •  Sorry Texas! (18+ / 0-)

    No socialist meds for you! We wouldn't want to oppress you any further...

    "They got the guns but, we got the numbers." Jim Morrison

    by M Hussein H on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 10:56:11 AM PDT

  •  This is the way the world ends. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fernan47

    Not with a bang, but a whimper.

    Stephen King used those words by T.S. Eliot to start his novel The Stand.   That was probably one of the better novels I've ever read.  For those who have never read it, it was a novel about a weaponized version of the flu that was released from its research laboratory.   I can't help but think of it, when I see something like this.   Let's hope Captain Trips isn't paying us a visit.

    McCain * Palin 08 - A Bridge To Nowhere!

    by Beelzebud on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 10:56:21 AM PDT

    •  Please become familiar w/ the science (7+ / 0-)

      I can't help but think of it, when I see something like this.

      Basic knowledge will put this idea right out of your head.

      •  Where did I say I was speaking from authority? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        fernan47

        I'm familiar with science, thank you very much.

        These were my initial thoughts.   You know what thoughts are, right?  It's still ok to have them, no?

        McCain * Palin 08 - A Bridge To Nowhere!

        by Beelzebud on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:29:23 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Actually, that was my least favorite (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Michael D

      Stephen King door-stop.

      Has sweet concord o'er taken blackest woe?

      by QuaintIrene on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:12:13 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  My preparedness thoughts circle to that book (0+ / 0-)

      Power outages. Food shortages. Overcrowded medical facilities.

      I heard somewhere yesterday that as much as 25% of the US population could potentially get sick. If even 10% of us called in sick on any given series of days, we could easily see shortages of perishables at the stores.

      And then there's the impact to our already messed up economy. Remember how no one bought anything in the week after 9/11? If everyone stays home to avoid public places, plus sick people who don't go to work, the economy will take another slap.

      Thanks a LOT, Steven King. Loved the book, the reality scares the shit out of me.

    •  Cut this shit out (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      freakofsociety

      unless you have specific evidence.  Did you note that in the diary it stated that conspiracy theories on this can result in you getting banned from the site?

      Putting little question marks, "maybes", and "perhaps" into the diary just makes you sound like an uninformed amateur, and does nothing to shield you from being called out.  

      When your rhetorical tricks are the same used at fox news to "question" if Obama is a citizen or Fema is setting up concentration camps, maybe you should pause and reconsider your comment.

      An open mind gets filled with crap.

      by Empty Vessel on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:15:16 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You need to lighten up. (0+ / 0-)

        I wasn't spreading any type of conspiracy theory whatsoever, I was merely stating what my thoughts were.  

        McCain * Palin 08 - A Bridge To Nowhere!

        by Beelzebud on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:28:26 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Just thinking out loud? (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          freakofsociety

          [The Stand] was a novel about a weaponized version of the flu that was released from its research laboratory.   I can't help but think of it, when I see something like this.

          I don't care if you are just stating your thoughts--your thoughts are dumb, dangerous, and provocative.

          An open mind gets filled with crap.

          by Empty Vessel on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:34:26 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I'm sorry, I didn't realize thoughts were banned. (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            irmaly, Kestrel228, mbzoltan, Old Gardener

            It would be one thing if I was pushing some conspiracy theory.  All I did was mention a book I've read that was about a flu outbreak.   It scared the shit out of me, and when I see news of flu outbreaks I always think back to it.  Read my post again.  Not once to I say I think there is some dumb ass conspiracy theory going on here.  

            Sue me for having thoughts.  I didn't realize there was so many thin skinned people around here that would actually get uptight over an observation.  

            Next time I'll just keep my thoughts to myself.  I wouldn't want to upset someone who jumps to conclusions in an instant.

            McCain * Palin 08 - A Bridge To Nowhere!

            by Beelzebud on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:39:01 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  No (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              freakofsociety, Subo03

              You said

              Let's hope Captain Trips isn't paying us a visit.

              For anyone who has read the book, it is clear that you are employing a standard rhetorical trick to "ask the question"

              Here are some examples

                1. When I saw the World Trade center go down, I thought "wow, that looks like controlled demolition."  I'm no expert, mind you, but it sure looked like that.

                2. I haven't seen Obama's birth certificate, I wonder if he really had one?

              Watch Fox News, this is standard practice to both present inflammatory material, and preserve deniability.

              The other favorite trick is to change the subject.  So, instead of saying I defend my comment, you can turn it into "well that's just what I believe, are you trying to become the thought police?"

              Your comment implied that you are considering that this is a conspiracy, instead of defending the comment, you are choosing to deny you said it, and diverting the topic to some "thought police" argument.  I've watched this trick for 8 years, and I will call it even when it is done by someone on my team.

              An open mind gets filled with crap.

              by Empty Vessel on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:51:04 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  You're making a lot of assumptions. (0+ / 0-)

                My comment was my way of saying that I hope this isn't a very serious outbreak, like the one I read about.

                See this is the problem when you set up a strawman.  You're assuming what my intent was, when my intent couldn't have been further from what you're suggesting.  You can set up your little Fox News comparison and knock the strawman down, but it's meaningless, because you're jumping to conclusions about what my intent was, and assuming the worst.  

                Let me rephrase my last sentence of that post another way:

                I hope this thing isn't going to get really damn bad, because I read this book about 15 years ago that had a flu outbreak scenario play out, and it wasn't fucking pretty. Furthermore, I'm no conspiracy theorist, and I don't think this bug was made in a lab.  I only used a work of fiction as a reference point, because it was a book that made me really think about how horrible a flu outbreak could truly be.  The reason this thing has DNA from multiple flu strains is a direct result of something called evolution.  

                Is that enough, or should I dissect it some more?   From now on I won't be using pop culture references to speak for me, because it's clear that there are some out there so obtuse, and willing to "fight it out", rather than just think about what was said, that's it's just not worth it.  I'll keep those things that have influenced my thoughts over the years to myself, because I wouldn't want anyone jumping to conclusions about what was said.  

                McCain * Palin 08 - A Bridge To Nowhere!

                by Beelzebud on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:04:33 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  OK (0+ / 0-)

                  I'll pull back, and if this is what you were trying to say initially, then I was wrong.  That said, how about you also re-read the initial comment and consider if it could have been read another way.

                  I wasn't the only one doing the straw man thing (see all the thought police/censorship stuff in your comments)

                  Peace

                  An open mind gets filled with crap.

                  by Empty Vessel on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:12:00 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  I'm all for rationality and critical thinking. (0+ / 0-)

                    And I'm not someone that believes conspiracy theory, woo woo garbage.   19 religious fanatics were responsible for 9/11, and there is no question as to Obama's citizenship.   To lump that garbage into my post is ridiculous.  

                    I just don't see how referencing a work of fiction should now be shot down and called out.  I could understand it if at some point in my post I advocated that the plot of that book was what we were seeing happen now, but I never did.   As to the final sentence of the post, it also can easily be interpreted as "Let's hope a highly virulent outbreak of flue isn't paying us a visit."  That's why in my mind I took it to be an attack on any type of uncomfortable thought.  

                    Being skeptical minded is great as long as it's not applied with a hair trigger.  

                    McCain * Palin 08 - A Bridge To Nowhere!

                    by Beelzebud on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:19:30 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                  •  you were wrong (0+ / 0-)

                    and entirely out of line.  the comment was very clear in context.

                    Geithner + Summers = EPIC FAIL

                    by fernan47 on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 05:09:38 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

          •  Chill out guy (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Kestrel228, mbzoltan, Old Gardener

            The Stand was written almost 30 years ago - a lot of people have read it. Including yours truly.

            And, seeing as they're Stephen King's thoughts, not the OP, maybe you need to tone down the flamethrower a tad.

            "Why would that kind of work be 'ridiculous'? Who are THEY fighting for?"-------------- BHO on the GOP's mockery of community organizers.

            by speedingpullet on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:40:33 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  1 nation, indivisible, w secession & tamiflu... (8+ / 0-)

    ... for all

    Texas Gov Rick Perry, not 10-11 days after talking of Texas seceding from the US, asks for US Gov Drugs.

    Lord, that makes me laugh.

    I guess it's another way of looking at the War on Drugs, or something.

    GOP = Oppositional Defiance Disorder

    by auntialias on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 10:56:25 AM PDT

  •  Where can I get breaking news alerts (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    marysz

    about swine flu? When there's a new advisory, when it's in my state, etc.?

  •  The power of the government (6+ / 0-)

    This is a good opportunity to point to your conservative associates how important a coordinated federal response is in a situation like this. State's rights and faith-based actions will not save you from a global pandemic.

  •  are quarantines in the plans (0+ / 0-)

    of the CDC?


    We need to get back to bedrock American values like torture and secession. - Josh Marshall

    by AlyoshaKaramazov on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:00:13 AM PDT

  •  This will give the Texas (13+ / 0-)

    secessionists a chance to develop their own vaccines. Self-sufficient individualists that they want to be.

    -- We are just regular people informed on issues

    by mike101 on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:00:14 AM PDT

  •  Are the treatments for this virus (3+ / 0-)

    the same in Mexico as they are here? I mean, are they using the same kinds of medications there to treat, like Tamiflu? Could that explain why the illness is more severe in Mexico?

    •  unknown (4+ / 0-)

      but the scale is different, the reporting by the local PH is different, so it's hard to know.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:02:33 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Not established that it is. (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      marysz, GN1927, jj32, skohayes, Sleepwalkr

      The # of total infections is unknown, so we can't figure a mortality %.

      If 1000 people are infected, and 100 die, that's bad news. If 100,000 people are infected, and 100 die, that's tough to pull out of the background noise.

      I suspect that mortality % will be fairly low, and that infection here is simply not as broad. Also, the monitoring system is at full alert now, and wasn't two weeks ago.

      Let's let the numbers settle before we jump to conclusions.

      •  Plus the infection/exposure rate is still unknown (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DemFromCT

        No one really has a handle on how easy it is to get infected - whether or not you get really sick or just have a mild case - and how exposed you need to be to it.

        Different diseases have a different exposure/infection rate - depending on the strain, the method of transmission etc...

        And, thanks so much again DemFromCT, for posting regular diaries on this.
        I for one really appreciate all the effort you're making to keep people informed :-)

        "Why would that kind of work be 'ridiculous'? Who are THEY fighting for?"-------------- BHO on the GOP's mockery of community organizers.

        by speedingpullet on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:34:04 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Yes (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jj32, mango, skohayes

      Tamiflu and Relemza are being used. The government has stated that they have sufficient quantities at this time.

    •  same treatments according to press accounts (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DemFromCT

      However, I have heard a number of accounts on BBC and CBC suggesting that initial cases may not have been recognized and treated appropriately - allowing some early spread in different parts of the country before health authorities realized what was happening

      But by all accounts the ministry of health is now on top of it, medical providers and the public are extremely aware, and people presenting with symptoms now are likely to be diagnosed and treated correctly.

      Once social change begins,it cannot be reversed. You cannot uneducate the person who has learned to read...You cannot oppress people who are not afraid anymore.

      by terjeanderson on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:05:18 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Conspiracy theories? (3+ / 0-)

    I haven't seen anyone spouting off about them when it comes to Swine Flu; it seems to me to be a singularly silly topic to make conspiracy theories over anyway.  But then, I'm a virologist, so I can easily see that there's no conspiracy.

    Outside that old "Ebil-ution", that is.

  •  Kudos to the CDC (7+ / 0-)

    They're top-notch, as many if not most public health professionals are. Funding is down, and maybe that should be addressed sooner than later.

    We are lucky to have the CDC, and IIRC it hasn't been politicized.

    Diseases know no politics.

    Joe Biden: Get up! Al Gore: Pray, and use your feet! Harriet Tubman: Keep going!

    by JG in MD on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:01:31 AM PDT

    •  of course it was (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      marysz, freakofsociety, JG in MD, dotalbon

      but that's another topic for another day. Richard Besser is good. And he comes from preparedness training,as he ran the CDC office on preparedness prior to being elevated.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:04:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Was he there under Bush? (0+ / 0-)

        I'm just wondering. He seems rather good at his job.

        Let's put this to bed. Yes, I am an Obamabot!!! You've found the foolish worshiper!

        by freakofsociety on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 04:33:55 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  not all PH jobs are political appointees (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          freakofsociety, mariachi mama

          I interviewed him here, 3/08.

          Dr. Richard Besser, who is the Director, Coordinating Office for Terrorism Preparedness and Emergency Response (and a pediatrician) on the issues of SNS stockpiling and pediatric dosing and instructions, pointed out that pediatric dosing forms (liquids) don't always have the same shelf life as other formulations, and that once the SNS meds arrive and are taken by the state for distribution, state (and not federal) shelf life rules apply. With acknowledgment that more needs to be done for pediatric emergencies in general and panflu meds in particular, there will be ongoing work to do so in the coming months.

          We also discussed with Dr. Besser the sometimes overlapping roles of CDC, ASPR and DHS, particularly when it comes to personal preparedness (there's nothing more discouraging than pandemicflu.gov recommendinging 2 weeks of prep and  DHS saying three days) and advice on home care (ultimately that may be an ASPR function, with both agenices partnering with orgs like the Red Cross). Non-federal entities are more nimble here (see getpandemicready.org), and the ongoing need and challenges in keeping personal preparedness in the public forefront despite the known difficulties with the public's perception that this isn't a 'hot topic'.

          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

          by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 05:09:18 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Some one lookin for Fed Help (7+ / 0-)

    Rick Perry, After Raising Secession, Calls For Fed Help With Swine Flu

    Gov. Rick Perry today in a precautionary measure requested the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provide 37,430 courses of antiviral medications from the Strategic National Stockpile to Texas to prevent the spread of swine flu. Currently, three cases of swine flu have been confirmed in Texas.

    "As a precautionary measure, I have requested that medication be on hand in Texas to help curb the spread of swine flu by helping those with both confirmed and suspected cases of this swine flu virus, as well as healthcare providers who may have come in contact with these patients," said Gov. Rick Perry. "We will continue to work with our local, state and federal health officials to ensure public safety is protected."

    "The wise man points to the stars and the fool sees only the finger - and discusses it 24/7 on cable and am radio."

    by jimstaro on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:03:01 AM PDT

    •  Latest swine flu test results (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      freakofsociety, GlowNZ

      in Mexico, according to Jose Angel Cordova, Mexico’s health secretary:

      He said 20 of the 68 deaths are confirmed to be from the new strain of influenza, while tests were still being conducted on the other 48.

      He said the genetic code showed the virus had originated in Eurasia and could have entered Mexico via Texas or California.

      .

      Link:http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/5222211/Mexican-killer-swine-flu-UK-on-alert.html

      Habeas Corpus:See Hamilton quoting Blackstone in The Federalist Papers, number 84.

      by Ignacio Magaloni on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:22:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  so it came from the united startes? (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        rlharry, freakofsociety, jds1978

        Can't wait for it to be renamed THE AMERICAN SWINE FLU.

        also, it won't stop lou dobbs going on a rant about how illegal immigration caused this.

        http://politicz.wordpress.com/

        by GlowNZ on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:25:33 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Ha. Looking at the quotation, (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          freakofsociety

          I think all that could be reasonably argued is that it came from Eurasia--I would speculate a more logical route would be through air travel from Eurasia into the busy Mexico City airport: perhaps the Texas or California route indicates that they are mapping the patters of infection from the March flu spike Mexico experienced.

          It is still a mystery why the strain is more virulent in Mexico than elsewhere. We'll find out soon, I gather.

          I do hope this virus does not have legs after its initial jaunt around the world.

          Habeas Corpus:See Hamilton quoting Blackstone in The Federalist Papers, number 84.

          by Ignacio Magaloni on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:41:16 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Dear Governor Perry: (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      irmaly, RustyCannon, kt in seattle

      I urge you to resist the temptation to request and receive medication from the federal government for a possible swine flu pandemic in Texas.  There most likely will be strings attached just like the federal funds for unemployment insurance for those unemployed Texas losers. You must "draw the line", sir.  No federal funds for flu!

      Irresponsible wealth leads to unaccountable power.

      by rlharry on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:07:11 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Why is it that, right around the time (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Floja Roja, dotalbon

    when we may actually see investigations/prosecutions for torture (!), now we're ALL GONNA DIE?!

    God has a really twisted sense of humor. Crap.

  •  Letter to the editor (18+ / 0-)

    I just fired this off:

    The Department of Homeland Security has declared a public health emergency because of the rise of swine flu cases. That should have been the job of Health and Human Services - but it wasn't, because Republicans continue to block approval of President Obama's nominee, Kathleen Sebelius, over her support of abortion. Without an HHS secretary and her team in place, we are fighting a possible pandemic at less than full strength.

    Obama campaigned on preserving abortion rights, and he won. He gets to pick cabinet officers who support his policies. Republicans - who made that same argument when George W. Bush made his nominations - are just playing politics with Obama's cabinet. And they are risking the country's health by doing so.

    It is not the business of the state to help its citizens get into heaven nor to save them from hell.

    by DanK Is Back on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:05:01 AM PDT

  •  The, "no HHS yet" point is a good one (10+ / 0-)

    Don't want to play politics with this, but the GOP should be hammered over it, real consequences to obstructionist tactics.

    I note that Mr. Rick "secede" Perry is now asking the Federal Government for help in dealing with this.

    Guess Jesusland needs some good old fashion secular big-government help eh?

    "Biden's tears did more for the equality Of the sexes than Palin's presence" - Leah Renna

    by edgeways on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:06:10 AM PDT

    •  Yes, we should play poltics with it (3+ / 0-)

      See my LTE (which at the moment is right above your comment) for an example of how to play the politics.

      There is playing politics, and then there is playing politics. The Republicans are playing it to gain political points (as they see it) by stopping Obama from being an effective leader and governor. We are playing politics to get things done, not for whether it benefits a particular political party.

      It is not the business of the state to help its citizens get into heaven nor to save them from hell.

      by DanK Is Back on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:08:29 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  One thing you can't say is that Obama's (7+ / 0-)

    first 100 days have not been eventful.

    And now there are plagues.  Couldn't make this shit up.  

  •  Gov. Perry looking out for the Texicans.... (6+ / 0-)

    Torture good, Marijuana bad.
    Doc in the Twitterverse

    by xxdr zombiexx on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:10:02 AM PDT

  •  Heading to Europe this week (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    OLinda

    And I'm thinking of wearing a mask on the airplane.  Will probably get some weird looks, but I don't want to spend my vacation sick.  

    Any idea if this year's flu shot is effective against this strain?  

    "Right wing freak machine" General Wes Clark

    by Tracker on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:12:33 AM PDT

  •  Cat owners, be very careful....... (12+ / 0-)

    Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

    "We are not quitters." ...President Barack Obama 2-24-09

    by Ekaterin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:16:23 AM PDT

  •  and now is when you see the (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    marysz, rlharry, paxpdx, wa ma, RustyCannon

    positive results of a federal government run by the adults.


    We need to get back to bedrock American values like torture and secession. - Josh Marshall

    by AlyoshaKaramazov on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:16:29 AM PDT

  •  Excuse me, did I hear that right? Texas wants (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    SeaTurtle, FishBiscuit

    meds from the Feds? Governor, put your cock where your mouth is, and secede.  

    "The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who in times of great moral crisis maintain their neutrality." - Dante

    by jazzence on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:17:30 AM PDT

  •  Gov. Perry has requested national stockpile meds (6+ / 0-)

    I guess he'll have to hold off on secession until the plague abates.

    Smiting trolls on the tubes since 1977!

    by blue aardvark on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:17:32 AM PDT

  •  Proves the danger of indulging magical thinking (4+ / 0-)

    all those who say, "who cares why someone is a liberal - if they do it because Jesus personally told them to, or because they "received" it in a dream from a dead ancestor, or because they believe they are the reincarnation of a liberal preshitorical priestess, or because the aliens are transmitting liberal sentiments through the fillings in their teeth - let's not make them uncomfortable by challenging their magical thinking, let's embrace them in this big fat Democratic tent".

    Nevermind evidence right in our faces of the danger of a party embracing its kook fringe - that's worked out really well for the GOP, hasn't it - nevermind the immunization-phobia that has already sickened and endangered our children - here, yet again, is evidence of the dangers of tolerating magical thinking in our midst.

    If we don't insist on reason everywhere in public policy and politics, we won't get reason when and where we need it the most.

    These conspiracy kooks aren't the result of spontaneous creation; they haven't emerged full-grown from the bowels of fear, anti-science and unreason.

    They are here because we have tolerated, indulged, and coddled them; because, in a place where skepticism, questioning authority and challenging conventional wisdom are de rigeur when it comes to politics and ideology, we have made challenging faith - whether it comes wrapped in traditional vestments or cloaked in crystals, voodoo and incantations  - a taboo.

    When half our community don't even believe in evolution, we should not be surprised when panic-triggered conspiracy viruses break out in concert with and amplifying outbreaks of biological viruses.

    Banning conspiracists will not end conspiracy thinking in our society, so I hope we match the bans with rigorous promotion and highlighting of uncompromisingly rational scientifically-based front page posts.

    And, I hope we learn from this to stop indulging magical thinkers just because they spout liberal code-words. The real enemy of progress is the antireason virus.

    One day posterity will remember, this strange era, these strange times, when ordinary common honesty was called courage. -- Yevgeny Yevtushenko

    by RandomActsOfReason on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:17:43 AM PDT

  •  Most of the over 1,000 people in mexico (0+ / 0-)

    suspected of having it, don't.  They have been cleared.

    http://politicz.wordpress.com/

    by GlowNZ on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:21:50 AM PDT

    •  I've seen nothing to substantiate this assertion (0+ / 0-)

      ... either in US stories or in any of the Mexican newspapers (La Jornada, which is very critical of the government generally, El Universal, etc.).

      Indeed, latest figures I've seen are 1,600 ill, 108 dead. I'm guessing the "ill" figure is probably low, and the mortality may be a bit high 'til they can confirm it, but haven't seen anything from anyone other than this one comment suggesting that any of the suspected cases have been "cleared".

      "I like to go into Marshall Field's in Chicago just to see all the things there are in the world that I do not want." M. Madeleva, C.S.C.

      by paxpdx on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 08:42:01 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  4 cases of swine flu confirmed in Nova Scotia, 2 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    G2geek, FrugalGranny

    4 cases of swine flu confirmed in Nova Scotia, 2 in B.C. Gl  

    4 cases of swine flu confirmed in Nova Scotia, 2 in B.C.
    Global vigilance grows amid Mexico's outbreak
    Last Updated: Sunday, April 26, 2009 | 2:02 PM ET

    Nova Scotia and British Columbia have confirmed cases of swine flu, while new cases of the infection have been found in New York City, as health officials around the world test for a virus linked to a more serious outbreak in Mexico.

    Nova Scotia's chief public health officer, Dr. Robert Strang, said Sunday the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg confirmed late Saturday that four young people in the province are recovering from "relatively mild" cases of the disease.

    Strang said the four are between the ages of 12 and 18 and all attend a private school in the Windsor area of Nova Scotia.

    They had been part of a group of students who were on a school trip to Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula in early April, Dr. Gaynor Watson-Creed, medical officer of health for Capital Health, told reporters

    B.C.'s Centre for Disease Control on Sunday confirmed cases of swine flu involving two people from the province who recently returned from Mexico.
    NYC students with swine flu after Mexico trip

    In New York, Mayor Michael Bloomberg confirmed Sunday that eight students attending St. Frances Preparatory School in Queens have swine flu. Tests returning positive results were carried out by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Ga.

    More than 100 students at the private high school have been suffering from fever, sore throat and muscle ache since Thursday. Bloomberg stressed that their symptoms of influenza were "mild."

    Some of the students had recently travelled to Mexico, the New York Times and New York Post reported.

    There have been 12 confirmed cases elsewhere in the United States this month: seven in California, two in Kansas, two in Texas and one in Ohio.

    All of these infections have been relatively mild, with only one person staying in hospital for a brief time, said Dr. Keiji Fukuda, the World Health Organization's director-general for health security and environment.

    In Mexico, a new type of swine flu virus is thought to have killed 86 people since April 13. More than 1,300 others have become ill with suspected cases of the infection.

    President Felipe Calderon on Saturday invoked new powers that give his government special powers to run tests on sick people and order them isolated, a day after all public events in Mexico City were ordered suspended until further notice.
    Churches deserted in Mexican capital

    In Mexico City, church services were cancelled on Sunday. Mass at the Metropolitan Cathedral was broadcast over the radio.

    The latest measures come one day after experts advising the World Health Organization on the outbreak met at WHO headquarters in Geneva. The UN health agency declared the epidemic "a public health emergency of international concern."

    The panel will convene on Tuesday to advise the WHO whether to raise the global pandemic alert level. The current alert level is 3 on a scale of 1 (low risk of human cases) to 6 (efficient, sustained transmission between humans).

    New Zealand Health Minister Tony Ryall confirmed on Sunday a group of Auckland college students who returned from a three-week visit to Mexico on Saturday "likely" have swine flu.

    "Ten of the 13 students who had flu-like symptoms have proven positive for influenza A and the swine flu is a subset of influenza A," he said. So we're going to send the swabs to Melbourne for further analysis. We should have that information in a matter of days, but our officials here think it's highly likely they have."

    French Health Ministry officials said four possible cases of swine flu are under investigation, including a family of three in the Nord region and a woman in the Paris region. The four recently returned from Mexico.

    Spain's Health Ministry said three people who just returned from Mexico were under observation in hospitals in the northern Basque region, in southeastern Albacete and the Mediterranean port city of Valencia.
    'The makings of a pandemic'

    Dr. Donald Low, the chief microbiologist at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto who played a key role in battling the SARS crisis in 2003, says while there haven't been any confirmed cases in Canada yet, it could be just a matter of time before they appear.

    "Considering that we see about 600,000 people travel from Mexico to Canada each year and that we've just come through the March break period, it wouldn't be surprising at all for us to recognize cases in Canada, and we're preparing for that, as we have been preparing for a pandemic in the last five years," he told CBC News.

    "What you're seeing here is the makings of a pandemic," Low said. "You're seeing a new virus that we have no natural immunity to. You're seeing a virus that can cause disease, and in causing disease, can transmit from person to person.

    "All it needs to complete that equation is the recognition that it's spreading over a wide geographical area. And I think that's what we're hearing this weekend, that it's actually happening," he said.

    http://www.cbc.ca/...
    _______________
    We would like to thanks all News Sources for their humanitarian contributions to reduce morbidity and mortality in this crisis.

    As if you could kill without injuring eternity.

    by Snowy Owl on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:24:34 AM PDT

  •  Is this a real threat? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    happynz, ZenTrainer

    Or is it just another avian flu?  I always feel like the media blows these out of proportion - and even if we should be taking some precautionary steps - there are more important things to pay attention to that are killing people right now.

    •  Im not too concerened. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      freakofsociety, happynz

      even if it doesn turn into something big, panicking doesn't help.

      I thought earlier, would I rather live during the influena outbreak of 1918 or now?  

      a pretty easy question to answer.

      http://politicz.wordpress.com/

      by GlowNZ on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:28:33 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  yes this is a real threat (7+ / 0-)

      an international public health emergency exists. CDC just had a Sunday press conference.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:30:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  driving on the road (0+ / 0-)

        is more of a threat to your health.

        http://politicz.wordpress.com/

        by GlowNZ on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:32:09 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  And this is what Napolitano told us (0+ / 0-)

        to make of the state of emergency:

        "The first thing I want to announce today is that the Department of Health and Human Services will declare today a public health emergency in the United States. That sounds more severe than really it is. This is standard operating procedure and allows us to free up federal, state, and local agencies and their resources for prevention and mitigation; it allows us to use medication and diagnostic tests that we might not otherwise be able to use, particularly on very young children; and it releases funds for the acquisition of additional antivirals.

        So you’ll see those declarations coming out today. And when I say "standard operating procedure," that’s exactly what I mean. We issued similar declarations for the recent floods in Minnesota and North Dakota and for the inauguration."

        It's in the transcript.

        Let's put this to bed. Yes, I am an Obamabot!!! You've found the foolish worshiper!

        by freakofsociety on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 06:47:04 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  as I said in my main post (0+ / 0-)

          "A routine step :public health emergency in the US: has been taken"  - but that it had to be done on a Sunday is extraordinary. Don't under-appreciate this this, either. The SNS deployment of stockpiles of antivirals around the country does not happen every day.

          Treating it like "business as usual" completely misses what's going on.

          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

          by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 06:56:03 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  A Sunday briefing from the WH/CDC/DHS? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      marysz, churchylafemme

      Don't blame this one on the media.

      Even a potential pandemic is a threat. And avian flu is still waiting in the wings.

      Only that day dawns to which we are awake... Henry David Thoreau

      by graycat13 on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:32:02 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  omg we're going to die! (1+ / 1-)
        Recommended by:
        happynz
        Hidden by:
        chillindame

        jesus christ.  and while we're at it, lets not forget ebola, malria, tb, plain influence, measles and mumps.

        sigh.

        http://politicz.wordpress.com/

        by GlowNZ on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:35:02 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  That's kind of how I feel (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          freakofsociety, GlowNZ

          And sure this has the potential to be a huge killer, so let's make sure people know to take some precautions and know it's going on, but there's no reason to sensationalize it or make people fearful for their lives.

        •  Ebola is too deadly... (8+ / 0-)

          to turn into a pandemic, malaria is local, tb is seeing a resurgence in some areas ( drug resistance is climbing), but it limited, I have no idea what you mean by plain influence, measles is something that can be handled, same with mumps.  HOWEVER, a possible pandemic from swine flu is very serious and your condescending comment is a waste of everyones time.

          Intelligence is the new black.

          by chillindame on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:43:09 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Yes.I believe the mortality rate for death (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          mollyd, RustyCannon

          is 100 %. So why panic over this?

          Only that day dawns to which we are awake... Henry David Thoreau

          by graycat13 on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:47:42 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Ebola used to scare me (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          freakofsociety, Floja Roja, rossl

          It doesn't anymore, because it's too fast a killer and it's too obvious. Any virus that kills quickly is easier to contain. Malaria, tb, measles, mumps and influenze kill or killed many, many people before we had vaccinations and control measures in place. Heck, malaria is still a leading killer in Africa.

          We are all going to die... eventually. Nobody is suggesting that we panic. But this disease is nothing to sneer at, either. We need to 1) be aware and 2) take a bit more than normal precautions against getting the flu.

          •  Influenza... (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            mollyd, KimD, rossl

            apparently, misspelling is contagious. ;-)

          •  Nobody is suggesting we panic (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            freakofsociety

            but the incessant, sensationalized coverage of this makes people panic.

            •  How do you cover something like this? (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              rossl, Pizzapotamus

              It's like the Y2K problem. If the media cover it in a way that gets attention but doesn't get too intense, then a lot of people don't get the message. If they treat it seriously, then almost everybody gets the message, but some people panic. The problem is that there is no way to say the words "pandemic potential" without sounding dramatic. The same information, even the same presentation, will cause some people to simply pay attention and others to panic. Heck... some people panic over the slightest hint of trouble.

              Personally, I think that the risk of a global pandemic IS something worth focusing media attention on. Like Y2K, it's the kind of thing that can be prevented if people take it seriously and take steps to prevent it. Of course, I'm not the panicky type. Heck... I was flying on New Year's Day of 2000.

              •  I just resent that (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                freakofsociety

                it's pushing other, possibly more significant news stories out of the way.  And like I said, I resent the way the media sensationalizes it and only covers it in the most superficial way possible, as they do with everything else they cover.

                •  U.S. television (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  rossl, Wisewood

                  I was in Canada, at a hotel, when the tsunami hit a few years back. I had access to both U.S. and Canadian news. The Canadian channels covered the full tragedy. The U.S. channels covered the Americans who were killed - very few, by the way. Yes, we are superficial. But given that Americans seem to have the attention span of a mosquito with ADD, I'm not sure that there are a lot of options.

        •  are there public health emergies being declared (0+ / 0-)

          over the other viruses? Do you know what this is going to look like on Wednesday? Or next week?

          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

          by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:18:25 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Napolitano said a public health emergency was (0+ / 0-)

            also declared during the inauguration if I remember correctly. I know you watched the same press conference I did. No I don't know what it's going to look like next week but I don't think the declaration of a public health emergency should be taken as something it isn't. She was careful to explain what they were doing. Yes I know you were responding to Glow but I just felt compelled to answer that.

            Let's put this to bed. Yes, I am an Obamabot!!! You've found the foolish worshiper!

            by freakofsociety on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 06:38:04 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  oh, come on (0+ / 0-)

              how often do you think WHO declares a "public health emergency of international concern" simultaneously with HHS calling a Sunday WH news conference for a public health emergency of their own?

              ya know, there'd be people arguing about the i's and t's  in the Declaration of Independence.

              "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

              by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 06:42:17 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  This is what she said: (0+ / 0-)

                "The first thing I want to announce today is that the Department of Health and Human Services will declare today a public health emergency in the United States. That sounds more severe than really it is. This is standard operating procedure and allows us to free up federal, state, and local agencies and their resources for prevention and mitigation; it allows us to use medication and diagnostic tests that we might not otherwise be able to use, particularly on very young children; and it releases funds for the acquisition of additional antivirals.

                So you’ll see those declarations coming out today. And when I say "standard operating procedure," that’s exactly what I mean. We issued similar declarations for the recent floods in Minnesota and North Dakota and for the inauguration."

                If you've got an issue take it up with her. She doesn't want people freaking out about it.

                Let's put this to bed. Yes, I am an Obamabot!!! You've found the foolish worshiper!

                by freakofsociety on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 06:48:22 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  sigh - nor do I (0+ / 0-)

                  that doesn't mean pretending this is simply as routine as a traffic accident, which is where this conversation started.

                  A situation of international significance is taking place. People are responding appropriately, and with skill. They are calm, and you should be, as well.  That does not mean "it's nothing". People are also doing things that have never been done before, including a Sunday presser. Richard Besser, CDC Director, said several times "I am worried."  I'm glad he is.  It's his job to worry.

                  "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                  by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 07:04:54 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

    •  The risk of avian flu is real (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      fernan47

      It's like car accidents. We have a lot more near misses than actual hits, but that doesn't mean that we start driving carelessly because we can't get into an actual accident. If we do that, sure enough we will have a lot of crashes. So far they have contained several outbreaks that could have been serious if they weren't contained. Eventually our luck may run out. Or they may keep on top of things for another hundred years.

  •  Went out and bought a ton... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    churchylafemme, Floja Roja, KimD

    ...or pasta and canned veggies and am studying the water purification methods of which I knew something about. This is the circumstance when my somewhat wimpy immune system will save me instead of kill me. Lucky I am almost out of that stage of "young healthy adult" that was so deadly in 1918 and appears to be so far today.

    There's something attractive about invincible ignorance... for the first 5 seconds.

    by MNPundit on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:25:11 AM PDT

    •  seems rather an overreaction (4+ / 0-)

      do you avoid driving becasue more people die on the roads everyday that have got this thing

      http://politicz.wordpress.com/

      by GlowNZ on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:29:38 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Nah I avoid driving... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        skohayes

        ...because I don't like to pay for the gas and use carbon. Looking at myself I realize I am weak. If this were even the 19th century, my body would not have been strong enough to survive to adulthood. I would have died in childhood from illness.

        With the multiple existential threats we are under today like Global Warming, Peak Oil and Pandemics any that can end human civilization above a subsistence level and that have some potential to spell the end of known sentient life in the Universe, I have begun to try to find a way to survive in the absence of civilization.

        Learning about this stuff is something I've been doing for years, not as a reaction of the Mexican outbreak. Though if cases start popping up in the county I'm living in, I'll start wearing a mask. I already wash my hands whenever I come home from somewhere. Just habit to try and not get sick as much.

        Also pasta* is my favorite food.

        Finally, I don't think it's an over-reaction. This flu is novel and it is spreading quickly internationally. Currently I'm estimating mortality rates at about 5.9% (at the high end) from all the numbers I can find. A mortality rate of 6% wouldn't destroy society but it would cripple it.

        *I did not buy an English or Metric ton of pasta, I bought 5 larger bags worth 'cuz I am out except for a helping of spaghetti.

        There's something attractive about invincible ignorance... for the first 5 seconds.

        by MNPundit on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:51:06 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  It's good to be prepared (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skohayes

      for ANY coming emergency, be it a disease pandemic, a blizzard, flood, hurricane, tornado, etc. As we've sadly learned, you can't necessarily count on help to arrive when you need it, and individuals should be prepared to be self-sufficient in the meantime.

      I believe that this kind of preparation helps to reduce panic.

      Oops! I'm gonna need a whole new sig!

      by sillia on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:56:37 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I'm a bit of a germaphobe... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sillia

        ....so preparing is how I reduce the fear that getting sick brings with it. It's not so bad normally, but whenever there is a new deadly disease I freak out (SARS, Bird Flu). On the other hand, this also has benefits as I support large amounts of aid to Africa, a healthier developed self-sufficient and peaceful Africa will reduce the likelihood that some weird disease will come out of there and kill half the planet.

        There's something attractive about invincible ignorance... for the first 5 seconds.

        by MNPundit on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 05:49:34 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  It's all a hoax (6+ / 0-)

    to get us into Obama's FEMA Camps!!

    Glenn Beck was right.

    -------------------------------------------------------
    Take your protein pills and put your helmet on

    by SFOrange on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:27:01 AM PDT

  •  3 months of food? (8+ / 0-)

    Where would I keep it?  Never mind 3 months of water.

    NYC apartments are not conducive to this.

    I do have some food stored in a closet, and will get some more, but 3 months food for 4 people .... got no idea where I'd put it.  3 months water is utterly impossible.

    OTOH, I do have a Brita filter.  

    •  you aren't freaked out until you start reading (6+ / 0-)

      those PDF's.  Makes me want to buy a shotgun, buy a mean dog, move into a remote area...    uh     !!!!

      Holy crap!

      I'm turning Republican!!

      SAVE MEEEEE!!!

      (I mean, really!)

      *Dear NSA, these are not the droids you're looking for.*

      by mechboots on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:55:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  No worries. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      plf515, wa ma

      You need one gallon/day/person.  You already have Central Park.  

      My plan with the Wabash River water (scary!), which will probably be overkill for water from an NYC park:

      1.  Have five gallons of good water ready beforehand (two people).  (Always a good idea in case of boil orders).  
      1.  When the good water goes down to 2 gallons, clean out a bucket with a quart of water and bleach, then rinse with another quart.  Let bucket dry naturally.  
      1.  Get bucket of river water, then let it settle for a day.
      1.  With a saucepan, slowly scoop out the top 3/4 of the water.
      1.  Strain the water through cheesecloth
      1.  Boil the water.
      1.  Add 16 drops of unscented bleach per gallon and let stand for 20 minutes.  (Perhaps Step 6 or Step 7 can be skipped, but I'm paranoid.)
      1.  Drink.  To improve flavor, pour it from glass to glass.  Perhaps the juice of a lime would make it more palatable.  

      2009: Year of the Donkey. Let's not screw it up.

      by Yamaneko2 on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:48:49 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  That is useful info! (0+ / 0-)

        I gotta book mark this somehow ... or is there a good link or something?

        It does rain fairly often here, we get about 4 inches per month, then there is the Hudson.  

        •  You can collect rainwater (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          plf515

          in a tarp, if you have someplace to anchor it. Funnel the water into a container. That is probably the cleanest solution.

          Boiling and bleaching river water will clear it of bacteria and viruses, but if their are other pollutants (diesel fuel, heavy metals, chemicals) they will still be present. I would assume there are pollutants in the Hudson, even though they have cleaned it up a lot in recent years. If you're going to drink that, better filter it. See Big Berkey filters, with Black Berkey cartridges (scroll down to see what they filter for).

          Oops! I'm gonna need a whole new sig!

          by sillia on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 02:09:13 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  NYC (0+ / 0-)

        water system is very old but among the best in the world and is largely pressure fed naturally from upstate.

        I don't think it would fail under these circumstances.

        Geithner + Summers = EPIC FAIL

        by fernan47 on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 05:27:53 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Who can afford 3 mos of groceries? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      freakofsociety, mariachi mama

      Let's bust them up in little pieces so they can't hold us hostage like this.

      by RustyCannon on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 04:26:16 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Boy, look how much more popular (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DemFromCT

    these pandemic diaries are, when one is directly possible!!!

    (I'm indicting myself as well).


    We need to get back to bedrock American values like torture and secession. - Josh Marshall

    by AlyoshaKaramazov on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:28:28 AM PDT

  •  Were Number One!! (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    chillindame, aaraujo, speedingpullet

    Lets hear it for Socialized Medicine.

    The World Health Organisation rated Britain as one of the two countries best prepared for an outbreak, alongside France.

    The NHS is better than anything I ever had in America, glad to be home.

    Former Republican, voted for Obama, tri-national (British, Irish, EU Citizen also US) card carrying member of New Labour, that works in The City.

    by Libertarian Friend on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:30:50 AM PDT

  •  How many people die of inlfuenza every year? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    freakofsociety, happynz

    less of the hysteria from the media will be appreciated but not hoped for.

    http://politicz.wordpress.com/

    by GlowNZ on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:31:20 AM PDT

  •  Demfrom CT, I dont think that (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    churchylafemme, Floja Roja

    the diary of MrMichaelMT is that great (as you indicated above).   See this comment here.  Hood203 is right.

  •  How we are handling this in the UK. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mikidee, aaraujo, happynz, mbzoltan

    Up a few comments I listed how France and the UK are rated as the best countries to meet this health crisis.

    Because I realize that most on the other side of the pond do not have a clue on how a proper health care system actually works, here is what is happening here.

    In the last day an individual here returned from Mexico and was feeling flu like symptoms, so what does he do?

    In America, you would be wondering who to call and wondering how much it would cost.

    Here, you can call NHS Direct speak to a qualified individual. The individual I just mentioned did just that. Later, a prescription of Tamiflu was delivered at no cost for the patient and the family members in the house.

    Cheers!!

    Former Republican, voted for Obama, tri-national (British, Irish, EU Citizen also US) card carrying member of New Labour, that works in The City.

    by Libertarian Friend on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:37:50 AM PDT

  •  Figures... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Ky DEM, wa ma, GlowNZ

    I have been working through all of my food preps (had almost four months worth at one point) because I have been getting ready for jaw surgery and six weeks of no solid food and now this. Crap!

    Intelligence is the new black.

    by chillindame on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:37:59 AM PDT

  •  I have been sneezing like this for years (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    happynz, wa ma, GlowNZ

    I had a series of clean room classes in 1985, and they showed a slow motion sneezing segment, which was obviously creating a pollutant in the clean room. I have been sneezing into my sleeve ever since. My mom used to complain to me when she witnessed my sneezing this way, but I never changed my ways.

    So, it's was surprising to see that this is now considered the proper way to do it . . .

  •  I hate this (0+ / 0-)

    I know im normally rational but i sneezed and coughed and i go omg!

    lol

    http://politicz.wordpress.com/

    by GlowNZ on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:45:42 AM PDT

  •  This... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    freakofsociety, FishBiscuit

    unfortunate outbreak leads to some speculation about how petty the GOP's recent strategies have been.

    We have them obstructing an HHS nominee over a wedge issue, when we now find ourselves in a situation where the office is of paramount importance.

    We have the governor of Texas requesting federal help, when not two weeks ago, he was waxing whimsical about how detaching from said federal government. All it took was couple of flu cases to send him groveling.

    On a grander scale, this also allows us to explore how such a situation would be handled in the purely  libertopian state that some would advocate.

  •  Will having or not having the flu shot matter? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    happynz

    Here's to the start of a great 8 years!

    by Xtatic on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:48:34 AM PDT

  •  John Nichols, (8+ / 0-)

    one of our great national opinion journalists, is reporting that the GOP stripped $900 million in funds for pandemic flu preparedness from the stimulus package.

  •  A matter of time before (0+ / 0-)

    this breaks like a dam in the SW US?

    "I know that you cannot live on hope alone, but without it, life is not worth living." Harvey Milk

    by Sansouci on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:50:27 AM PDT

    •  a lot of people MAY OR MAY NOT get it (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      G2geek, happynz

      noone knows but most people won't die of it and will only show mild symptoms.
      '

      http://politicz.wordpress.com/

      by GlowNZ on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:54:19 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  if it stays US style (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        paxpdx, Floja Roja, Ky DEM, KimD

        one thing about flu, it constantly mutates.

        So don't be so reassuring.

        "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

        by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 11:56:00 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  specifically from WHO (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        G2geek, KimD

        GENEVA: The swine flu virus that has killed dozens in Mexico could mutate into a "more dangerous" strain, a senior WHO official said on Sunday, adding that the UN agency will decide on Tuesday if it should raise its alert rating. "Yes, it's quite possible for this virus to evolve," Keiji Fukuda, acting WHO assistant-general for health, security and the environment told journalists. "When viruses evolve, clearly they can become more dangerous to people," he said.

        http://www.channelnewsasia.com/...

        "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

        by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:35:55 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  it can go either way. (0+ / 0-)

          It could become more virulent or less.  

          In favor of "less virulent" is the conventional theory that viruses spread more efficiently when the victims are alive and running around in crowds, than when they're sick in bed or dead.

          Though, we don't know which direction it's going to go, which is why people should a) take this seriously and at the same time b) keep calm heads.  

          •  yep (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            G2geek

            The central question every flu expert in the world would like answered, Dr. Martin Cetron, director of global migration and quarantine for the Centers for Disease Control, said in an interview, is how many mild cases Mexico has had.

            http://www.nytimes.com/...

            "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

            by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 06:32:27 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  that's the tough part: because the mild cases... (0+ / 0-)

              ...don't go to the clinic.  Even in Mexico where the public health system is better than ours because they don't have the uninsured problem and anyone can walk into a clinic any time.  

              In the US this is going to be interesting to follow.  We can alert the public such that the insured population go to doctors at the first sign of flu-like symptoms, and that will pick up some of it.  Then we have to make comparisons from within the insured population and extrapolate to the uninsured, to get a sense of the scope of this.  

              Right now it appears to be relatively mild up here.  Question is, if someone gets the mild version right now, what (based on theory if nothing else) is the probability that they will thereby develop even a partial immunity to a subsequent severe version if one occurs?  

  •  The CDC guy was saying (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    GlowNZ

    that it's good that we're coming out of flu season because that will help prevent the spread. FINALLY a reason for me to look forward to warm weather, which I kind of hate...

    DemFromCT, can you say anything more about that?

  •  Another DemFromCT ? (0+ / 0-)

    How do you think the WHO is doing so far? They seem to be much more alarmist about this than the CDC. Rightly so? Or not alarmist enough?

  •  All cases in Canada are recovering well (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    happynz, GlowNZ

    From different sources the cases are mild with a light respiratory problems.

    As if you could kill without injuring eternity.

    by Snowy Owl on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:09:27 PM PDT

  •  Maybe with this latest flu scare (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DemFromCT, freakofsociety, happynz, GlowNZ

    people will start being civilized and re-learn the basics of good hygiene. How many times have I been in a public restroom and seen my fellows walk out without even a cursory handwash?  Aside from the health considerations, it is simply disrespectful.

  •  I Get Grief For Being a Handwasher (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    marysz, wa ma, GlowNZ, melpomene1

    but as a teacher, you have to keep your hands clean. I get sick way less than most due to this and am trying to impart this on my daughter at a young age. I get mocked, but I call it the best prevention.

  •  I don't have any questions today except one (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Julia Grey, Catte Nappe

    about Fran Townsend.  Why, oh why does she have to turn this into a political discussion?  I know, it's a rhetorical question.

    When interviewed on CNN immediately after the White House Press Conference today, most, if not all, of her answers related to the prior administration vs. today's administration... like how her administration prepared for this and could teach the new administration.

    She also complained that Secretary Napolitano SHOULD have mainly been the one to inform the public, not an advisor, so Townsend was critical of who spoke at the Press Conference.

    She seems to enjoying herself nowadays, all tanned and trim and...

    America truly is a shining beacon for all the world to admire, because when we torture people, we have medical personnel overseeing the abuse.

    by gooderservice on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:28:17 PM PDT

    •  interestingly (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Julia Grey

      she chaired the homeland security council in the WH and she was the panflu point person.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:35:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  If you get a chance to watch her, I think you (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Julia Grey

        will find it interesting.

        I truly would have expected to hear facts from her; well, would have wanted to hear facts not wrapped around trying to rehabilitate the former administration and compare and contrast it to the current one.

        America truly is a shining beacon for all the world to admire, because when we torture people, we have medical personnel overseeing the abuse.

        by gooderservice on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:17:16 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Swine Torture (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    happynz
    Funny how a mediocre virus with limited capacity for mischief has routed the torture issue in the media.

    Malibu Stacy has another new hat.

  •  some preventative respiratory self-care (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Catte Nappe, sillia

    as a perennial sinus sufferer I have come upon the following which have helped me tremendously.

    Not suggesting for one minute that this will have any impact on respiratory avian/swine, etc.flu, but it will definitely keep you healthier from regular virus' and allergies.

    1. NeilMed Sinus Rinse Kit, available per Amazon, but also through many pharms and box stores.

    Really suggest that you get the 16oz bottle instead of the 8oz or you will be filling the 8oz bottle 2x.

    1.  Organic Tea Tree Oil which is a disinfectant, anti-viral, and anti-fungal.  I put 1 or 2 drops into the NeilMed mix.  I also use Tea Tree Oil in other ways (1/2 drops in warm water and gargle with sore throat,) and it works amazingly well for me.

    Just thought I would share this because it has been a HUGE help to me.  Simple solution; modern version of the Neti Pot.

    Keeping our respiratory systems well can't but help; and I would guess rinsing after being out in crowds wouldn't hurt either.

    Criminal Investigations MUST TAKE PLACE into the Bush Administration's Policies and Practices of Torture!

    by SeaTurtle on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:46:51 PM PDT

    •  I agree! (3+ / 0-)

      As a longtime sinus/allergy sufferer, sinus rinsing has improved my health a lot. More and more doctors are advising their patients to do this--in fact my husband's doctor told him to get exactly the kit you linked to.

      My ENT surgeon got me started with a Waterpik-type device with a special nozzle for nasal rinsing. I have used it every day for years. I can prevent an allergy headache if I remember to rinse after being exposed to allergens. I can also prevent a sinus infection by rinsing more often when I've got a cold.

      Some people swear by the neti pot, which unlike the other two devices pours the water gently rather than spurting or burbling it through. After talking to a lot of people about this, I think it's a matter of the geography of your particular sinus passages. When I tried the neti pot, the water did not get into the right places, so it wasn't doing any good. Other people might have better luck.

      Oops! I'm gonna need a whole new sig!

      by sillia on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 02:26:01 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Tea tree oil is a ferocious antibiotic... (0+ / 0-)

      ...that has been found to be effective against highly resistant staph infections.  This has been published in peer-reviewed journals.  

      For this reason it should NOT be used casually, because doing so could bring about resistance to it.   Save it for when dealing with serious (as in life-theatening) illness and nothing else will work.  

      For regular use gargling and so on, saline solution alone should be sufficient.  

      •  I agree with you (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        G2geek

        Dr. Grossan, who developed the nasal irrigator that I use, says not to put anything into your sinuses except the saline solution. This is actually a 'Ringer's solution' which is the same salinity & pH as your blood.
        His reason is that the cilia in the sinuses are extremely delicate and you could be causing more problems by damaging them. Developing a resistance to an antibiotic would be even worse.

        I have also read somewhere that tea tree oil loses its efficacy in storage, which makes me wonder how useful that bottle is that's been sitting in my cupboard for several years...

        Oops! I'm gonna need a whole new sig!

        by sillia on Mon Apr 27, 2009 at 07:36:16 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  True - all essential oils, bar a few, (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          G2geek, sillia

          lose thier effectiveness over time.

          Its a good idea to mark the date on the label and change out medicinal oils at least every two years (or less, depending on how you store them).

          Fortunately, Tea Tree is fairly cheap and readily available, so buy some more for treatment.

          BTW - the old oil makes a great freshener and general disinfectant for toilets, sinks and garbage disposals, to pour the contents in there before chucking the bottle in recycling.

          Also   OT, but good to know - Tea Tree is an amazingly good de-louser,

          As an ex-teacher, I inevitalby ended up with a case of nits during my teaching career.
          Use Tea Tree in generous quantites, combed fully through your hair. Leave for 30 minutes and wash out.
          The creepy little bastards die from the oil, and it also kills the eggs too.

          Just so you know ;-)

          "Why would that kind of work be 'ridiculous'? Who are THEY fighting for?"-------------- BHO on the GOP's mockery of community organizers.

          by speedingpullet on Mon Apr 27, 2009 at 07:51:50 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Please be clear: Tea Tree IS NOT an antibiotic (0+ / 0-)

        and consequently approaching its usage with the same logic as a produced antibiotic is a misapplication of measurements.

        I approach Essential Oil use with appropriate caution and respect and moderation.  I would like to see an article that said that Tea Tree usage behaved in the same way as antibiotics...you are comparing apples with oranges.

        Not using them in the sinus' as others have suggested may have a point, but another aspect for Essential Oil use is that their efficacy is highly dependent on the person's own chemistry (like everything else,) so it has to be tested by the individual.  So I am not suggesting that everyone use it, but simply reporting on my experiences.

        More about

        Tea Tree Essential Oil

        Criminal Investigations MUST TAKE PLACE into the Bush Administration's Policies and Practices of Torture!

        by SeaTurtle on Mon Apr 27, 2009 at 08:42:46 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Is there a danger that the virus could morph (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Old Gardener

    into a more virulent strain?  And if so, how fast can influenza evolve.  This piece made me wonder....

    GENEVA: The swine flu virus that has killed dozens in Mexico could mutate into a "more dangerous" strain, a senior WHO official said on Sunday, adding that the UN agency will decide on Tuesday if it should raise its alert rating.

    "Yes, it's quite possible for this virus to evolve," Keiji Fukuda, acting WHO assistant-general for health, security and the environment told journalists.

    "When viruses evolve, clearly they can become more dangerous to people," he said.

    Is it possible for the virus to evolve that quickly - over the course of weeks or months?

    "... ..... .. ...."

    by Jahiz on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:50:39 PM PDT

  •  Will Lou Dobbs capitalize on this latest scare? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Julia Grey, mariachi mama

    The Swine Flu is scary enough by itself, we don't need hate-mongers like Dobbs and his Band-o-Racists making it any worse.

    Will Dobbs jump at this chance?  Think about it, he's done it before.

    http://progressnotcongress.org/...

  •  Who's having dreams about an elderly black lady? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Julia Grey

    Y'know, an old black lady in a cornfield beckoning to you and telling you to bring all your friends...

    Or did anyone dream about a scary ass walkin' dude staking you?

    Waster of electrons, unlawful enemy combatant. http://meldroc.com/

    by meldroc on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 12:59:32 PM PDT

  •  Studies on interventions to prevent transmission (3+ / 0-)

    Studies on interventions to prevent the transmission  

    Studies on interventions to prevent the transmission of respiratory syncytical virus and similar viruses in more typical settings suggested good effectiveness, although doubt was cast on the findings because of method quality inherent in controlled before and after studies, especially different virus infection rates. Few studies reported on resource consumption for the physical intervention evaluated.

    One case-control studyw45 concluded that handwashing needs to be carried out more than 10 times daily to be effective. One study,w25 in a military training setting, reported a need to wash hands more than four times daily. During one month of the respiratory syncytical virus "season" on a ward containing 22 cribs, one study reported that 5350 gowns and 4850 masks were used.w18

    Proper evaluation of global and highly resource intensive measures such as screening at entry ports and social distancing was lacking. The handful of studies (mostly done during the SARS epidemic) did not allow firm conclusions to be drawn.

    In this systematic review we found that physical barriers such as handwashing, wearing a mask, and isolation of potentially infected patients were effective in preventing the spread of respiratory virus infections. It is not surprising that methods of the included studies were at risk of bias as these types of interventions are difficult to blind, are often set up hurriedly in emergency situations, and funding is less secure than for profit making interventions. Hasty design of interventions to minimise public health emergencies, particularly the six included case-control studies, is understandable but not when no randomisation (not even of clusters) was done in the several unhurried cohort and before and after studies, despite randomisation leading to minimal disruption to service delivery. Inadequate reporting often made interpretation of before and after studies difficult. The settings of the studies, carried out over four decades, were heterogeneous, ranging from suburban schoolsw4 w37 w29 to military barracks,w25 intensive care units, paediatric wardsw14 w16 in industrialised countries, slums in developing countries,w1 and day care centres for children with special needs.w22 Few attempts were made to obtain socioeconomic diversity by, for example, involving several schools in the evaluations of one programme.w29

    We identified few studies from developing countries where the most burden lies and where cheap interventions are needed. Even in Israel, the decrease in acute respiratory tract infections subsequent to school closure may have been related to atypical features: the high proportion of children in the population (34%) and limited access to over the counter drugs, which together with the national universal comprehensive health insurance means that symptomatic treatment is generally prescribed by doctors.w19

    Compliance with interventions—especially educational programmes—was a problem for several studies, despite the importance of such low cost interventions. Routine long term implementation of some would be problematic—particularly maintaining strict hygiene and barrier routines for long periods, probably only feasible in highly motivated environments such as hospitals without the threat of an epidemic.

    Global and highly resource intensive measures such as screening at entry ports and social distancing lacked proper evaluation. The handful of studies (mostly done during the SARS epidemic) did not allow us to reach any firm conclusions, although a recent analysis of historical and archival data from the 1918-9 influenza pandemic in the United States suggests an effect of social distancing measures such as school closures and bans on public gatherings.24

    Nevertheless our systematic review of available research does provide some important insights. Perhaps the impressive effect of the hygienic measures aimed at younger children derives from their poor capability with personal hygiene.w1 w11

    Simple public health measures seem to be highly effective at reducing the transmission of respiratory viruses, especially when they are part of a structured programme including instruction and education and when they are delivered together.

    Further large pragmatic trials are needed to evaluate the best combinations. In the meantime we recommend implementing the following interventions combined to reduce the transmission of respiratory viruses: frequent handwashing (with or without antiseptics), barrier measures (gloves, gowns, and masks), and isolation of people with suspected respiratory tract infections.

    What is already known on this topic
    People are increasingly concerned about pandemics of virus infections such as avian influenza and SARS

    Preparation against pandemics includes developing vaccines and stockpiling antiviral agents—interventions that are virus specific and of unknown effectiveness in epidemic disease
    What this study adds

    Several physical barriers, especially handwashing, masks, and isolation of potentially infected people, were effective in preventing the spread of respiratory virus infections

    Such interventions should be better evaluated and given higher priority in preparation for pandemics

    (Accepted 23 October 2007)

    http://www.bmj.com/...
    _______________
    We would like to thanks all News Sources for their humanitarian contributions to reduce morbidity and mortality in this crisis.

    As if you could kill without injuring eternity.

    by Snowy Owl on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:00:26 PM PDT

  •  Hand Washing Hand Washing Materials (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    marysz, happynz, skohayes

    Hand Washing

    Hand Washing Materials

    Why should I wash my hands?

    Washing your hands is one of the most important things you and your family can do to prevent illness.

    Clean hands can help protect you from infectious and food-borne illnesses. If you get sick, it can keep you from passing your illness to others.

    Hand washing protects your health by helping to remove dirt and germs that get on your hands during almost any activity.

    If you don't wash your hands, the germs on your hands can get into your mouth, nose, eyes, cuts and scrapes, even your food, and make you sick.

    But my hands look clean!

    Even though your hands may look clean they can still have dirt and germs on them. Germs are too small to see with the human eye. They can only be seen through a microscope.

    When should I wash my hands?

    Wash your hands BEFORE:

    Eating
    Feeding Children, The Ill or Elderly
    Touching Foods - Especially Foods That Won't Be Cooked
    Cooking Food
    Touching or Bandaging a Cut or Scrape
    Inserting or Removing Contact Lenses
    Taking Care of a Sick Person
    Wash your hands AFTER:
    Eating
    Working
    Playing
    Touching Animals
    Touching Foods - Especially Raw Meat, Poultry, Fish and Eggs
    Using The Bathroom or Helping Others in the Bathroom
    Changing Diapers
    Cleaning Up Animal Feces
    Coughing, Sneezing or Blowing Your Nose
    Taking Care of a Sick Person
    Touching Blood or Other Body Fluids
    Touching Cuts, Sores or Rashes
    Cleaning The House
    Handling Garbage
    What is the right way to wash my hands?

    Wash your hands with running water and soap for at least 15 seconds.

    The water should be running. Moving water helps remove dirt and germs. Standing water allows dirt and germs that were washed off to get back onto your hands.

    Your hands should be under the stream of water so the front and back, and as far up to your wrists as possible, get wet.

    The water should be comfortable to the touch. If the water is too hot, you can burn yourself. If it is too cold, the dirt and germs may not get washed off.

    Get soap all over your hands

    Include the fronts and backs of your hands and as far up your wrists as you can get.

    You can use any kind of soap.

    Take your hands out from under the water and rub your hands together to make a lather. Do this for at least 15 seconds.

    The lather should cover the front and back of your hands and your wrists.

    Work hard on the areas between the fingers and under the nails where the dirt hides.

    You can use a sponge or cloth to help get the dirt off, but do not use the same cloth or sponge to wash more than one person's hands. Wash sponges or cloths regularly.

    Rinse your hands.

    The water should run back into the sink, not down your arms.

    Dry your hands completely, using a clean towel.
    Use paper towels or air dryers in places where there are a lot of people.

    http://www.lapublichealth.org/...

    As if you could kill without injuring eternity.

    by Snowy Owl on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:02:52 PM PDT

  •  4 mild cases confirmed in Canada (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KimD

    "Go well through life"-Me (As far as I know)

    by MTmofo on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:06:30 PM PDT

  •  Airline Travel advisory for flights to/from Mexic (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wa ma

    MONTREAL, April 26 CNW Telbec - Due to an outbreak of Human Swine
    Influenza in Mexico City, Air Canada is providing the following information
    for customers with plans to travel to/from the area:
    For customers with reservations for travel to/from Mexico City up to
    April 30th, Air Canada is waiving change fees in order to facilitate changes
    to travel plans and allow for travel at a later date.

    Customers may rebook their travel without penalty, through Air Canada
    Reservations at 1-888-247-2262; TTY hearing impaired: 1-800-361-8071, or
    through their travel agent.

    Air Canada continues to monitor the situation closely and will provide further travel updates as developments occur. For further information on Swine  Influenza, customers are encouraged to consult the

    Public Health Agency of
    Canada website at: www.phac-aspc.gc.ca.
    _______________
    We would like to thanks all News Sources for their humanitarian contributions to reduce morbidity and mortality in this crisis.

    As if you could kill without injuring eternity.

    by Snowy Owl on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:11:09 PM PDT

  •  DemFromCT - (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    OLinda, freakofsociety

    I noticed you updated with the CQ transcript of the press briefing, perhaps you could also provide the link of the video in your update.  C-SPAN has the video up on its website.  

    "... ..... .. ...."

    by Jahiz on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:17:36 PM PDT

    •  good idea... (0+ / 0-)

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:35:50 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Question (0+ / 0-)

        If a kid has a cold with a cough but no fever, clearly not the flu, would you keep him home from school anyway? Suppose also, it's in an area where there are no flu reports.

        This is a hypothetical question, not a request for medical advice.

        •  do you want other parents to like you? (0+ / 0-)

          or not?

          In general, if the kid is sick, stay home, and absolutely stay home if he doesn't look well or has fever.

          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

          by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 05:12:12 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Gosh, I didn't think it would be (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            DemFromCT, freakofsociety

            an assessment of my qualities as a human.

            Under normal circumstances, reasonable, compassionate, people conduct their lives normally, if uncomfortably, when they suffer a common cold. In my experience, a cold is not a reason to keep any kid home. That assumes there is no generalized discomfort, fever, or other alarming symptoms. We're talking about the sniffles here, nothing close to the flu.

            With that said, these might not be normal circumstances, which caused my question.

            •  I answered as a parent (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Catte Nappe, lgcap

              whose kids got sick at school, day care, etc. over the years, and the son of a school teacher who grumbled about all the people who use school as day care. ;-P

              Most people use fever or no fever as the rule, or not looking well.

              "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

              by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 05:34:14 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Back to my original point, (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                freakofsociety

                is the level of alarm such that people should overreact to a common cold?

                •  as of tonite, no (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  lgcap

                  "use your best judgment as a parent", and wait and see what tomorrow brings. My personal rule of thumb, by the way, was whether the kids slept. If they couldn't sleep, they weren't going to school.

                  "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                  by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 05:53:56 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Creepy follow-up (0+ / 0-)

                    He now has a fever, abdominal pain, and a wheeze. We've got all the asthma meds at home, so we're good with that, if he gets worse we'll give him the steroids. It still is certainty just a sinus infection gone to his chest. Obviously, the question isn't school tomorrow any longer.

                    The Family Practice doc will be overwhelmed with worried people in the morning, would the Department of Health be a better choice? The challenge is to get him somewhere that he can be tested, but that he won't catch something worse while he waits.

                    •  what does the health dept know about treating (0+ / 0-)

                      asthma? I'd call your own doc first and let them advise you.

                      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                      by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 07:29:49 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  There is nothing about his asthma (0+ / 0-)

                        that requires treatment we don't already have.

                        I was wondering the best place to get a flu test. It would be a waste of a doctors time to examine him now.

                        He is sleeping and coughing now. I'm going to get some rest too.

  •  Keep the goverment out of this. We need small Gov (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    happynz, Ky DEM

    I am waiting for teabaggers to come out and say that.

    "allow nothing to be in your life that you cannot walk out of in 30 seconds if you spot the heat around the corner". - movie HEAT

    by HEAT on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 01:22:51 PM PDT

  •  A bit of humor: La Cumbia de la Influenza (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    G2geek, mariachi mama

    Link en español

    La cumbia de la Influenza ya llegó!!!!!
    by judas on Abr.24, 2009, under Frikismo, Humor

    Agrupación Cariño

    ...

    Es la noticia del dia
    La influenza ya llegó
    Compren todos medicina pa’ enfrentar al batallón.

    Ya mejor que te de un sida
    Un cancer o comezón
    Hoy mas vale ser suicida con taquitos de pastor.

    Porque dicen que es la gripa perfecta
    Porque dicen que es la gripa perfecta
    No te vayas a perder cuñado todo se acabó

    This translation is probably wayyyy too close:

    It's today's news:
    Influenza has arrived
    Everybody, buy medicine to combat the batallion. (?)

    If you want to kill yourself, taquitos "al pastor" are even better than getting AIDS or cancer or a rash.

    'Cause they say it's the perfect flu
    'Cause they say it's the perfect flu
    Don't forget, buddy, it's the end.

    Tacos (taquitos) al pastor are made from marinated pork slow-roasted in the same way that a shawarma, kebab doner or gyro is.  It appears to be a delicacy in DF, though American health officials do not look kindly upon it.  My guess is that the diminutive "taquito" is used for art;  what we call a "taquito" is called a "flauta" in DF.

    2009: Year of the Donkey. Let's not screw it up.

    by Yamaneko2 on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 02:13:10 PM PDT

  •  Airlines waive change fees amid swine flu outbrea (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DemFromCT, Old Gardener

    Airlines waive change fees amid swine flu outbreak

    By JEFF CARLTON
    ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER

    FORT WORTH, Texas -- Multiple airlines are waiving change fees for passengers flying through Mexico because of an outbreak of swine flu but have not canceled flights.

    Fort Worth, Texas-based American Airlines said Sunday it will waive its usual penalty for changing reservations for anyone traveling to, from or through Mexico from Saturday through May 6. It applies to anyone who bought their ticket before Saturday.

    snip

    Mexico's health minister said swine flu has killed up to 86 people and likely sickened up to 1,400 since April 13.

    Federal health officials said Sunday that 20 swine flu cases have been reported so far in New York, Ohio, Kansas, Texas and California, primarily linked to recent travel to Mexico.

    more at http://www.seattlepi.com/...

    As if you could kill without injuring eternity.

    by Snowy Owl on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 02:16:23 PM PDT

  •  Is it safe... (0+ / 0-)

    To go to gyms?

  •  Would it not be safe (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    G2geek

    That until we have a clear understanding of the virulence of the swine flu to skip for a week all non-necessary exposures ??

    In a week we should have more datas and give a non-ambigious statement on prevfentive measures.

    But whashing of hands, respiratory etiquette, social distancing when not too stressful should be avoid.

    SNowy

    We sincerely are grateful to all News Sources for their humanitarian contributions to reduce morbidity and mortality in this crisis.

    by Snowy Owl on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 02:24:07 PM PDT

  •  Pneumonia vaccine? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Fabian

    Is the pneumonia vaccine, which is to prevent pneumonococcal pneumonia, effective against the pneumonia that often develops from influenza?  

    I seem to remember that it's bacterial pneumonia that people typically develop with infuenza.  

  •  We live in the Texas county where the students (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Catte Nappe, freakofsociety

    got sick. We just received a call from the school district informing us that all the schools in the school district are closed for a week. We've also gotten calls from the county health authorities informing us that the parks are closed, suggesting that we not attend church or other activities where people congregate and avoid letting our kids play together. They're taking this really seriously.

    "I agree with you now make me do it!" FDR

    by JC Dufresne on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 02:44:42 PM PDT

  •  Influenza Self-Care (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    freakofsociety

    Influenza Self-Care
    http://canprep.ca/...

    Information for Health Professionals

    Helping people to help themselves and others during influenza season and pandemic

    What is influenza self-care?

    Each year, influenza-associated illnesses have a substantial impact on an already strained health-care system. The system will be strained considerably more in the case of pandemic influenza.

    The Influenza Self-Care Strategy is designed to increase the public’s confidence and ability to prevent and treat influenza and to educate them about how best to use the health-care system during regular influenza season and pandemic.

    Your role as a health-care provider

    As a health-care provider, you have an important role to play in making the Influenza Self-Care Strategy work.

    Research shows that the greatest successes in changing long-term behaviour occur when a health education program is offered and supported by health-care providers while in direct contact with their clients/patients i.e. integrated into the health-care system.

    You can help them to help themselves by providing this information during consultations.

    The Influenza Self-Care Strategy addresses four areas of concern:

    Informing the public
    Prevention and self-care
    Managing the illness: Adults
    Managing the illness: Children
    Informing the public
    Influenza

    Influenza is an infection of the respiratory tract caused by one of three virus types:

    Influenza A, which causes the most severe and widespread disease, infects mammals (including pigs and horses) and birds;
    Influenza B, which infects only humans (commonly children);
    Influenza C, which is mild and rare.

    In North America, influenza usually affects people between November and April. The virus is defined by two surface proteins (antigens): Haemagglutinin (H) and Neuraminidase (N), which undergo frequent minor changes (antigenic drift), causing local outbreaks every two to three years. Most previously-infected individuals will continue to have some protection against the slightly changed virus.

    Pandemic influenza

    Three to four times each century, a radical change occurs in the genetic material of the influenza A virus, and a new subtype will suddenly appear with a completely new H or N antigen (antigenic shift). Protection people have developed to the influenza that occurs every year will not apply. The virus will spread rapidly around the world, causing a global epidemic (pandemic) with the potential to cause serious illness, death, and social and economic disruption.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) monitors influenza virus strains circulating in humans. Nations world-wide, Canada included, are preparing contingency plans.

    Influenza transmission

    The influenza virus is passed from person to person by droplets and small particles of respiratory fluid when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks. Airborne droplets can enter the body through mucus membranes of the eyes, nose or mouth. The virus, contained in droplets, can travel one to two metres in the air. It can live for one to two days on hard surfaces; eight to 12 hours on cloth, tissue or paper; and five minutes on hands.

    People develop symptoms of influenza from one to three days after becoming infected. They can spread the virus from one day before and up to five days after the onset of symptoms.

    Symptoms of influenza

    Primary symptoms include:

    Sudden fever 38C (100.4F)* or higher
    Dry cough
    Aching body, especially head, lower back and legs
    extreme weakness/ tiredness, not wanting to get out of bed

    Other symptoms can include:

    Chills
    Aching behind the eyes
    Loss of appetite
    Sore throat
    Runny/stuffy nose

    * For people older than 75 years, the temperature may be lower, e.g. 37.2C (99F). They may also experience vomiting, diarrhea or abdominal pain.

    Usually fever resolves in three to five days and the person experiences a general sense of improvement. Tiredness and cough can persist for several weeks

    http://www.health.alberta.ca/...

    We sincerely are grateful to all News Sources for their humanitarian contributions to reduce morbidity and mortality in this crisis.

    by Snowy Owl on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 02:46:45 PM PDT

  •  In 1918 and studies done (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Fabian, freakofsociety

    Communities who had taken non-pharmaceutical Interventions like avoiding gathering soon once there is an outbreak, reduce significally the morbidity rate.

    IMHO, This is a wise decision for your Region.

    We sincerely are grateful to all News Sources for their humanitarian contributions to reduce morbidity and mortality in this crisis.

    by Snowy Owl on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 02:49:39 PM PDT

  •  Fail (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    freakofsociety

    If the makers of this video planned to educate the public for public health purposes, they should have released it under a Creative Commons license so that people would feel free to share it widely.  Instead, they included an FBI threat of prosecution for copying.

  •  Managing the illness: Adults General self-care (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Fabian, freakofsociety

    Managing the illness: Adults

    General self-care measures

    Adults who have contracted influenza should:

    Rest.
    Avoid contact with others while contagious (five days), if possible
    Drink extra fluids.
    Gargle with warm salt water; use throat lozenges, saline nose drops, a humidifier.
    Avoid smoking and second hand smoke.
    Talk to others about concerns and ask for help if needed. Keeping in touch by phone or email can help alleviate feelings of aloneness when sick.

    Treat symptoms with over-the-counter (non-prescription) medication with careful attention to the following guidelines.
    Over-the-counter (OTC) medications

    Most people treat influenza with OTC medications that contain several active ingredients. People should be encouraged to consult with a pharmacist or their health-care provider regarding dosing, contraindications, side effects, etc.

    General OTC guidelines

    To prevent adverse reactions or taking in substances that have little/no effect, take an OTC remedy that treats only one symptom and/or has only one active ingredient.

    If taking more than one medication at a time, check the labels to avoid taking the same ingredient twice.

    Try "regular strength" before "extra strength."
    Follow instructions on the label and note any possible side effects or drug/health condition interactions.
    Check the expiry date and take outdated medications to a pharmacy for disposal.

    Keep all medications out of the reach of children.

    USE ALL MEDICATIONS AS DIRECTED ON THE LABEL.
    Treating specific symptoms with OTCs

    Muscle pain and fever

    Acetaminophen (preferred for older adults) or ibuprofen

    Cough

    Dextromethorphan (DM) for dry cough, only if it interrupts sleep or causes chest discomfort. Delsym® and Benylin-Dry Cough® contain DM without other ingredients.

    Nasal congestion

    Decongestant nose drops/sprays provide rapid short term relief. Watch for rebound congestion after two or three days, then switch to oral decongestants (e.g. pseudoephedrine).

    Sore throat

    Lozenges, throat sprays. Dyclonine (e.g. Sucrets®) will numb the throat; products with honey, herbs or pectin will soothe.
    Complementary medicines

    There is some research that shows the following may help shorten influenza illness or lessen its severity: Vitamins E and C, COLD-FX® (ginseng), Echinacea Plus® (herbal tea), elderberry (Sambucol®), quercetin, Bifidobacterium breve, homeopathic Oscillococcinum, gingyo-san (traditional Chinese herbal medicine), Kan Jang (Andrographis paniculata.

    Health-care providers should be informed about complementary medicines taken by clients and advise them on potential disease/drug interactions.

    When to seek medical care

    Primary concerns for adults are compromised respiratory function, dehydration and sepsis.

    Adults with influenza should seek medical care if they have heart or lung disease or any other chronic condition that requires regular medical attention; an illness or treatment that suppresses the immune system; or frailty.

    Individuals should seek medical care promptly if they have:

    Shortness of breath while resting or doing very little.
    Difficult or painful breathing.
    Wheezing.
    Coughing up of bloody sputum.
    Chest pain.
    Fever for three to four days without improvement or worsening.
    Improvement, then sudden high fever or recurrence of symptoms.
    Extreme drowsiness and difficulty awakening.
    Disorientation or confusion.
    Severe earache.
    New inability to function, if an independent elder.
    Persistent vomiting, if elderly.

    Prescribed medications - adults

    Antibiotics are not prescribed for uncomplicated influenza but may be for complications such as pneumonia.

    Antivirals must be started within 48 hours of the first symptoms of influenza to decrease length and severity of the illness.

    Managing the illness: Children

    Symptoms

    Influenza illness is more severe in children under five years old.

    Age-related differences are evident in infants and toddlers. Infants usually develop higher temperatures, and unexplained fever may be the only sign.

    Central nervous system symptoms may appear in up to 20 per cent of infants/children and may be suggestive of meningitis.

    Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain occur in 40-50 per cent, mainly those three years of age and under.

    Influenza is an important precursor of croup, pneumonia and bronchitis. Otitis media and non-purulent conjunctivitis are more frequent. Myositis is a frequent complication, especially after infection with Influenza B.

    Very young children and infants probably have symptoms similar to older children and adults but do not know how to tell caregivers. They may be irritable, eat poorly, and develop a hoarse cry and barking cough (croup).

    Children over five years of age and adolescents have symptoms similar to adults.

    Caring for children

    Treat symptoms if necessary using:

    Acetaminophen as the preferred medication to treat fever and muscle pain. Take the child’s temperature before giving an antipyretic. Do not wake a child to administer an antipyretic. Ibuprofen is an alternate medication but should not be used for children less than four months old.

    Important: Children under 18 years should NOT take acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or any products containing ASA, because of the potential for Reye’s Syndrome.

    Cough suppressant (DM) for a dry cough in children older than two years only if cough is interrupting sleep (not for asthmatics or moist cough).

    Saline nose drops or spray - decongestant sprays in children over six months, oral decongestants with older children, if needed.

    Throat lozenges or warm salt water for gargling. This may help children over six years of age.

    Other measures:

    Dress a child in lightweight clothing and keep room temperature at 20 C.
    Offer fluids/breast feed frequently while child is awake.
    Settle the child or involve them in quiet activities while at home (approximately five days).
    Use a humidifier (except with asthmatic children).
    Elevate head of the bed; infants may be more comfortable in a car seat or baby swing.
    Cool baths/alcohol rubs are NOT recommended.

    Humidifiers should be cleaned every day to prevent mold blowing in the air.

    Use hot water with one part bleach to 10 parts water.

    Scrub the inside with a cloth or bottle brush to get into tight corners.
    Rinse well with hot water.

    When to seek medical care

    Primary concerns for children with influenza are respiratory compromise, dehydration, secondary bacterial infection and neurological complications (more common in very young infants and children with chronic disease).

    Almost all children with influenza have fever - the presence or absence of fever as a sign of severity of influenza is not helpful.

    Parents/caregivers are advised to seek medical care for a child with influenza if the child:

    Is younger than three months old.

    Has heart or lung disease or any chronic illness requiring regular medical care.

    Has disease or is on treatments causing immunosuppression.

    Takes ASA regularly for a medical condition.
    Has a change in respiratory pattern with an increased respiratory rate and signs of labored breathing.

    Is very listless with a loss of interest in most things, e.g. playing, watching TV, eating/drinking.
    Is excessively irritable and inconsolable.
    Has significantly reduced urine output, for example urinates less often than every six hours while awake; or has a dry diaper for more than three hours if younger than six months, or longer than six hours if six to 23 months old.

    Looks very ill and the caregiver is worried.

    When to take a child to hospital emergency

    If the child:

    Has severe trouble breathing (not caused by nasal congestion).
    Has blue lips or hands or sudden pallor, or has cold legs up to their knees.
    Has a full or sunken fontanel.
    Is limp or unable to move.
    Is excessively sleepy to the point of being difficult to arouse or unresponsive.
    Shows signs of pain: headache and/or stiff neck, especially if combined with fever and listlessness and their eyes are sensitive to light.
    Seems confused.
    Has a seizure.

    http://canprep.ca/...

    We sincerely are grateful to all News Sources for their humanitarian contributions to reduce morbidity and mortality in this crisis.

    by Snowy Owl on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 03:05:57 PM PDT

  •  Pandemic influenza preparedness and response WHO (0+ / 0-)

    Pandemic influenza preparedness and response WHO guidance  

    Pandemic influenza preparedness and response
    WHO guidance document released Apr 26

    1. INTRODUCTION 14
    1. BACKGROUND 15

    2.1 How influenza viruses with pandemic potential develop 17
    2.1.1 The highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) virus and an influenza pandemic 17
    2.2 Ensuring ethical pandemic preparedness and response 18
    2.3 Integrating pandemic preparedness and response into general emergency
    preparedness 19

    1. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES IN PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE 20

    3.1 National preparedness and response as a whole-of-society responsibility 20
    3.1.1 Government Leadership 21
    3.1.2 Health sector 21
    3.1.3 Non-health sectors 22
    3.1.4 Communities, individuals, and families 22
    3.2 WHO 23
    3.2.1 Coordination under International Health Regulations (IHR 2005) 24
    3.2.2 The designation of the global pandemic phase 26
    3.2.3. Switching to pandemic vaccine production 26
    3.2.4 Rapid containment of the initial emergence of pandemic influenza 27
    3.2.5 Providing an early assessment of pandemic severity on health 29

    1. THE WHO PANDEMIC PHASES 30

    4.1 Definition of the phases 31
    4.2 Phase changes 33

    1. RECOMMENDED ACTIONS BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER A PANDEMIC

    36

    A. Phases 1-3 40
    7
    B. Phase 4 46
    C. Phases 5-6 51
    D. The post-peak period 56
    E. The post-pandemic period 58

    ANNEX 1 - PLANNING ASSUMPTIONS 61

    1. Modes of transmission 61

    Suggested assumptions 61
    Implications 61
    Scientific basis 62
    Selected References 62

    1. Incubation period and infectiousness of pandemic influenza 63

    Suggested assumptions 63
    Implications 63
    Scientific basis 63
    Selected References 64

    1. Symptom development and clinical attack rate 64

    Suggested assumptions 64
    Implications 65
    Scientific basis 65
    Selected References 66

    1. Dynamics of the pandemic and its impact 66

    Suggested assumptions 66
    Implications 67
    Scientific basis 67
    Selected References 68

    ANNEX 2 REVISION PROCESS 69

    http://canprep.ca/...

    We sincerely are grateful to all News Sources for their humanitarian contributions to reduce morbidity and mortality in this crisis.

    by Snowy Owl on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 03:29:17 PM PDT

  •  WHO MAIN ACTIONS BY PHASE (0+ / 0-)

    WHO MAIN ACTIONS BY PHASE

    We are presently at Phase 3, Tuesday WHO Emergency Meeting should raise the Phase to 4 or 4

    Here are the actions executed once WHO declare a new Phase.

    Planning and Coordination

    For Phase 4

    Direct and coordinate rapid pandemic containment activities in collaboration with WHO to limit or delay the spread of infection.

    For Phase 5

    Provide leadership and coodination and multisectorial resources to mitigate the societal and economic impacts.

    More at http://www.who.int/...

    We sincerely are grateful to all News Sources for their humanitarian contributions to reduce morbidity and mortality in this crisis.

    by Snowy Owl on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 03:42:48 PM PDT

  •  WHO holding at pandemic alert phase 3 for now (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    speedingpullet

    WHO holding at pandemic alert phase 3 for now

    Robert Roos News Editor

    Apr 26, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) today held to its position that more information is needed before a decision can be made about changing its pandemic influenza alert status from the current phase 3 to phase 4. Moving to phase 4 would mean that the new virus is transmissible enough to cause large outbreaks.

    At a briefing this morning, the WHO's Dr. Keiji Fukuda reiterated yesterday's message that the emergency committee wants more information to help it make the phase-change decision. "The committee will be reconvened on Tuesday unless there's additional information indicating we should meet earlier," he said.

    When prodded by reporters' questions about the appropriateness of waiting, Fukuda said, "If WHO makes a decision that the phase has changed, this is really a very serious signal to the world. I have no doubt that many countries are already taking these actions, but it does send a signal, so we want to make sure we're standing on pretty good solid ground."

    He also acknowledged that many groups are waiting for a WHO decision and promised that the agency would not delay it for long.

    Fukuda, who is the WHO's assistant director-general for health security and environment, emphasized how little is known yet about the new swine flu virus, and particularly why it seems to have caused severe illness in Mexico but only mild cases in the United States.

    "We don’t know how often it causes serious disease as opposed to mild disease, but apparently we see both of those things occurring right now," he said.

    He noted that only some of the cases reported in Mexico are lab-confirmed swine flu cases, whereas those reported in the United States are confirmed. "So it's very difficult to know if we are seeing a quite different situation in the United States and Mexico. The typical picture for influenza viruses is that they cause both mild and severe cases."

    Mexican authorities are trying to determine the fatality rate for the cases there, he noted.

    Experts have yet to determine the incubation period for the new virus, though flu viruses in general incubate anywhere from 1 to 4 days before causing symptoms, Fukuda said.

    In other comments, he said the WHO has seen no evidence that the illnesses are related to a bioterrorist attack.

    In response to a question about global preparedness, Fukuda said the past 5 years of pandemic preparedness efforts, though inspired primarily by the H5N1 avian flu virus, have left the world "much, much better prepared than we've ever been for dealing with this kind of situation."

    He said communications have been good, lab investigations have been completely quickly, and genetic sequences for the new virus are in public databases, among other positive developments. "I'm really impressed at how well countries have handled this," he commented.

    Replying to a question about the speed of Mexico's response to its outbreak, Fukuda defended the Mexican government's actions. He said the first cases surfaced while the country was still dealing with seasonal flu, making it harder to recognize them as something unusual.

    "When they did notice they were seeing an increase in pneumonia cases and in serious pneumonia cases I think they took actions that were prudent," he said.

    When a reporter said that Russia has banned pork imports from Mexico and asked if the action was appropriate, Fukuda responded, "Right now we have no evidence to suggest that people are getting infected from pork or exposure to pigs."

    Fukuda also noted that the WHO has 5 million doses of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) in regional stockpiles, but he did not mention any immediate plans to deploy them.

    See also:

    Current WHO pandemic alert phase
    http://www.who.int/...

    WHO description of alert phases and actions
    http://www.who.int/...

    Oct 24, 2008, CIDRAP News story about revision of pandemic alert phases
    http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/...

    We sincerely are grateful to all News Sources for their humanitarian contributions to reduce morbidity and mortality in this crisis.

    by Snowy Owl on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 03:48:27 PM PDT

  •  Can Pigs Fly? Looks Like it!! (0+ / 0-)

    "It's better to die on your feet then live on your knees" E. Zapata

    by Blutodog on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 04:02:31 PM PDT

  •  My brother and his wife are confirmed in VA (5+ / 0-)

    My brother and his wife returned last week from SoCal, to attend the graduation of her nephew from the Marines. Lots of people there from Texas. They were confirmed today as having swine flu. So add Virginia to the list of states. My brother works in DC, so they have notified everyone in his office building that they are at risk.

  •  Questions for DemFromCT (0+ / 0-)

    Hello. I'm a DailyKos reader.

    How much are we likely to learn about the new H1N1 influenza virus in the coming weeks?

    When will we have some idea how far it is going to spread, if it will become a pandemic, and how severe (pandemic catagories 1-5) it will be?

    I am planning cross-country travel within the USA for July. Under what conditions would the Federal government advise against or prohibit domestic travel? How would they go about doing that?

    •  you should be okay, but no guarantees (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Catte Nappe, KimD, lgcap, speedingpullet

      We'll know how it's spreading in the US by the end of the week. By that time, we'll have a better feel for whether the seasonal vaccine works, and a better feel for whether it looks more virulent.

      Over the next few days, we will most certainly hear about more cases in more places, and I'd expect WHO to act by Tuesday to change the pandemic phase to 4 or 5.

      We will not know about this being a pandemic virus until we know how easy it is to spread from human to human, and how sick it gets people. We know it can spread H2h, but by week's end we will know more. Right now it is simply a virus with "pandemic potential".

      But if it is a pandemic, pandemic waves can last for 4-12 weeks, so that's still very much an unknown, It is highly unlikely that travel would be prohibited in a pandemic (think 'advisory'), but that doesn't mean it'd be smart.

      This remains a worry, but better advice than that I can't give.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 06:51:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Who knows? (0+ / 0-)

      Even if the swine flu peters out next week, there are factors that would inhibit travel.  The Mississippi, Red or Missouri can flood.  The Big One could hit your destination or disrupt communications arteries.  There could be terrorist attacks, your own financial situation could crumble, your health much less your health insurance could fail, and so on and so forth.  It's amazing how unexpected a two-week stay in the hospital can be ten weeks out.  

      The greater risk is not that the Feds would ban travel, but that businesses that cater to travellers would shut down for the duration.  It makes no sense to operate a plane that nobody flies, a hotel without guests or a restaurant without diners, especially when its employees are sick, have sick family members or are simply scared to come in.  

      2009: Year of the Donkey. Let's not screw it up.

      by Yamaneko2 on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 10:25:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  A distraction? (0+ / 0-)

    Do you suppose the swine flu hype is to distract from the released torture memos? I remember that when the Downing Street Memos were released, there was another brouhaha, but I don't remember what it was. Many didn't even hear of the Downing Street Memos because the other "news" was being repeated and caught everyone's attention.

    •  Many Focus on Public Health for another (0+ / 0-)

      Seven days..and nights.

      We sincerely are grateful to all News Sources for their humanitarian contributions to reduce morbidity and mortality in this crisis.

      by Snowy Owl on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 07:52:25 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  No (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      paxpdx

      I'm quite sure there is no global conspiracy to "bury" the torture issue under a pandemic "hype". Most of the world would much prefer to do without this legitimate health alarm, and would very much like us to sort out the torture questions.

      "People who have what they want are fond of telling people who haven't what they want that they really don't want it." Ogden Nash (on universal health care?)

      by Catte Nappe on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 08:48:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Testing and verifying (0+ / 0-)

    Couple questions in that arena.

    1. With this coming in on the tail end of "normal" flu season, will they be able to test those who have been ill over the past week or two to see if it was, in fact, this new strain instead of "regular old flu"? Comes to mind with a colleague with pneumonia just out of ICU (in Dallas). I mean - boom! he was sick about 10 days ago; then really sick; then really, really, really sick to the point we weren't sure what would happen. That kind of thing happens. But if they wanted (in retrospect) to find out if he somehow picked up this stuff - could they?
    1. Thanks to today's presser the story is now top (or nearly all) of news broadcasts. Have local clinics and health departments been on fire in the background about this through the week-end? Or have they been waiting until Monday/work-week to think about collecting samples, running tests, etc.

    "People who have what they want are fond of telling people who haven't what they want that they really don't want it." Ogden Nash (on universal health care?)

    by Catte Nappe on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 07:54:35 PM PDT

    •  In Oregon (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Catte Nappe

      No reported cases, but our public health folks are working, both to get surveillance of recent possible cases as needed and to get distribution channels ready in the event those become necessary, too.

      Don't think anyone in public health is taking this weekend off, no.

      "I like to go into Marshall Field's in Chicago just to see all the things there are in the world that I do not want." M. Madeleva, C.S.C.

      by paxpdx on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 08:06:13 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Homeland Security Briefing Provides Best Overview (0+ / 0-)

    Press Briefing on Swine Influenza with Department of Homeland Security, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and White House

    It also lays out who in the government is responsible for what role. Basically it is Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and  Homeland Security.

    The responsibility breakdown sounds confusing but it looks like the key players know their roles and how to integrate with each other.

  •  What it's like in Mexico City these days (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Catte Nappe

    From an American friend who's halfway through a year-long service term as a youth leader of sorts with a small church in Mexico City:

    "Nobody leaves the house without a mask. It’s a grave and eerie feeling to see everyone walking around in surgeons masks... The fear is real. We’re against an enemy we can’t see. It does not discriminate, it has no mercy, and in a packed city of 25 million, it can’t be stopped... Epidemics breed suspicion. Eyes shift from one person to the next. Maybe THEY have the flu. Any sneeze or cough is met with icy stares.

    [...] Along with fear here there is a rising frustration with the Mexican government, which apparently has buried the issue since the first cases emerged in March. The late reaction has put containment out of the question."

  •  School closed in Ohio (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Catte Nappe, KimD

    They announced on the late local news in Cleveland that they will close one school in Lorain County, Ohio (just west of Cleveland) for one week because one of the children at the school has this particular flu.  The bright side is that they expect the child to make a full recovery.  Full details are at this link.

    I fully expect the MSM to go into full panic mode about this story, with 24/7 coverage on all the cable news channels regardless how severe the outbreak actually ends up being.

    I also wonder how fast Republcians will blaim President Obama for this.

  •  Props to Maine (0+ / 0-)

    For being so awesomely insane.  That video is nuts.

  •  El Mundo, Madrid: 103 deaths in Mexico (0+ / 0-)

    El Mundo

    Mexico now has said that 103 deaths have occurred amongst 1,600+ hospitalizations for flu-like symptoms.  About 400 patients have been hospitalized.  

    2009: Year of the Donkey. Let's not screw it up.

    by Yamaneko2 on Sun Apr 26, 2009 at 10:33:47 PM PDT

  •  need paid sick days- a grassroots response (0+ / 0-)

    This is revealing a huge problem in our current labor policies-- no paid sick days!  If people have no paid sick time off, they're not going to abide by the CDC recommendation to take time off.  It's an unstable economic time as it is.  We need to demand paid sick days now.  

    There's a great petition on this here:

    http://momsrisingaction.org/...

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