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Dr. Whitehead, Dean of the English Department in the Colleges of Arts and Sciences at the University of Arkansas swung a pretty big stick in his heyday there.  He was able to get important persons of letters to come and give free (well, at least to the public) readings of their material.  Notable amongst them were Ken Kesey and Allen Ginsberg.  Mrs. Translator and I went to both of those.

The fliers had been distributed around town for a week or two.  They were pretty much generic, essentially saying "Famous poet to give reading at the U of A on such and such date at 8:00 PM".  Well, Mrs. Translator and I decided to go, as we try to be cultured individuals and I was very familiar with Allen from reading.

For the very few of you youngsters who are not familiar with Ginsberg, he was pretty much by consensus the most important poet of the Beat Generation.  He, as a person of letters, was in equal standing with Burroughs and Kerouac in the 1950s and early 1960s.  His epic poem Howl is still a classic.  It is hard to read, because it is written in stream of consciousness mode.

The English Department promoted his visit very aggressively.  There were fliers and paper posts, and also adverts in the student newspaper, and the alternative one, The Grapevine, (any Fayetteville expatriates who remember that one?  It had adverts and coupons for the Bull'seye Pub for five game tokens and a beer for one dollar.  They also had dollar pitchers of beer during happy hour, from 5:00 to 6:00 PM Monday through Saturday.  Mrs. Translator and I were friends with the owner, and he would pull two, dollar pitchers of beer for us during happy hour and keep them cold for us and our friends even if we drank them at 8:00 PM.  Unfortunately this bastion of culture was razed and replaced, along with other Dickson Street icons with the Walton Center for the Performing Arts.  But I digress).

In any event, the night came when the poet came to read.  Because of the fliers promoting a "famous poet" and "free", the venue was very crowded.  The fliers  did not in any way say who, except for his name, that poet was, or that he was a very prominent member of the counterculture.  They did not say either that he was a confirmed and vocal homosexual.  Now it gets good.

The venue was the largest auditorium at the University, the Science and Engineering Auditorium.  For those of you from Fayetteville who remember your class sheets, it is SEAUD.

Mrs. Translator and I made our way into it, and it was crowded!  We finally found two seats together and sat down, ready to hear some readings.  As we looked around, there were hundreds of freshmen (we later learnt that they got ten points added to their grade after averaging to raise their gradepoint if they signed up on a sheet, a practice with which I disagree) and many older folks, looking retired and obviously wanting culture.

OK, the lights went up and out came Dr. Whitehead.  He introduced Ginsberg and was mercifully short about it.  Ginsberg came out next and thanked the University and Dr. Whitehead for inviting him to read.  Next, he introduced his friend (actually his lover, but the best lovers are friends) and began to prepare to read.  He opened his book, dressed in his tuxedo replete with cummerbund and ruffled shirt.  His hair was still sort of long, curly tangle, but he had lost the beard that you usually see in his pictures.  He did have quite the mustache, though.

The the words came.  At the top of his lungs, he screamed:

"OH, YES, FUCK ME IN THE ASS!"

Then he paused.

The atmosphere of SEAUD sounded like dozens of coveys of quail had just flown away.  The freshmen had already signed in, and had gotten their ten points, so they were gone.  I suppose that they were ready to find some beer.  I have never seen a freshman who did not have a thirst.

The older folks were more interesting.  The ones straight in front of us sort of turned purple, gasped, and got up and left rapidly, muttering something unintelligible.  After the opening statement, SEAUD was about 70 per cent occupied rather than standing room only.

Mrs. Translator and I went to the now open front row.  It was pretty awesome to see a Beat poet deliver his work.

He recited part of Howl, but not all of it because it is so long.  He also read a couple of other less well known works.

Then came intermission, and not much happened.  The second act was as interesting as the first was, and the two of them sang (not very well, I would say, but they sang).

He and his mate sang about eating jam on biscuits.  The jam supposedly had LSD in it.  As memory serves, his partner was using a squeezebox for musical accompaniment.  With my knowledge of chemistry, I do not think that is possible to cook jam and keep the LSD intact, but poetic license is OK for a poet.

Well, after some more reading, the show was over and Ginsberg invited the audience for free autographs.  I am not shy, but Mrs. Translator at the time was.  This is not any longer the case.

I got in line, with as I remember about four folks in front, and waited.  I took my Norton's Anthology of Literature with me, since it had Howl in it.

After a minute or two, it was my turn.  Most folks only wanted to get another autograph for their vanity.  He was not a very tall guy, and was, may I say, somewhat portly.  Since he was born in 1926, he would have been around 55 years of age, give of take since I do not remember exactly the year that he visited.

I offered my hand to him, and he took and shook it very nicely.  I also offered my book to him and asked him to sign the white space next to the title for Howl, and he said, "now who is plagiarizing me?"  I showed him the copyright and release, and he just laughed.  "I like to make a living doing this, and I do get a royalty."

Then I looked at his wardrobe.  It was very warm in SEAUD, and he had taken off his tuxedo jacket.  I pointed to his shirt and asked, "What's on your shirt?"  He said, "Did I spill mustard on my shirt?"

"No, you have something under it!"

"Oh, yeah"  Then he stripped his ruffled shirt off completely and dropped it to the floor.  Under it was his tee shirt.

"This is the Bob Dylan Rolling Thunder Review concert Tee Shirt.  Here I am!" and he pointed out himself there.  I was astonished.  Here is the greatest Beat poet stripping off his wardrobe to show me a tee shirt from the 1960s, and talking with me as if we had known each other for years.  We traded a little more small talk and he signed my book.  I went back to where Mrs. Translator was, and we exited SEAUD and got into our 1967 Camaro (which I still have) and drove home.

I had just spoken with and touched the most important poet of the Beat Generation, and he was joking with me.  I still have the autograph.

Here it is:

UPDATE:  Folks, I am very gratified that a simple experience of mine would be discussed so much.  Thank you very, very much for the attention that you have paid to this poor excuse for a post.  I shall be back here, and most probably more often at docuharma since there is a three essay per day limit, and sometimes I have thoughts that would not see the light of day here because of all of the traffic, although I love this site very much.

Warmest regards,

Doc

Simulposted at docudharma.com

Originally posted to Translator on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 07:01 PM PDT.

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Comment Preferences

  •  great diary - thanks! (7+ / 0-)

    "Democracy! Bah! When I hear that word I reach for my feather Boa!" - Allen Ginsberg

    by canadian gal on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 07:03:16 PM PDT

  •  allen was a genuine treasure (8+ / 0-)

    of course he wanted to show you The Tshirt with "there I am"...
    you know that he was well-aware that by starting off with the infamous o yes fuck me in the ass he would pare down his audience to those he wished to read for...
    and the singing was always loopy
    but strangely wonderful...
    i remember seeing him at a readin in the sixties when he pulled out these little finger cymbals chimchimchim -- and i thought: hey can poets do that? coooooooool.

    •  Watching the audience reaction (6+ / 0-)

      was interesting, but not as interesting as his reading was.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

      by Translator on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 07:14:26 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I was born in Fayetteville. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Translator, old wobbly, foolknot

        A very long time ago.  I know those NE Arkansas people and I can just imagine the reaction, especially in that time frame. More relaxed now, but very straight laced at that time.  

        Good on you for the autograph and personal experience.

        As you know, I have met a few truly seminal people in our culture, and each such person leaves you with something indelible--a treasured memory.  Give me a thinker over a celebrity any day.

        It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government to save the environment. - Ansel Adams

        by Otteray Scribe on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 08:21:27 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Hello, my friend! (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          old wobbly, Otteray Scribe

          I agree, but some of them are both.  I am thinking about Kipling, Einstein, Hawking, just to name a few.  But I agree in essence, most celebrities are not thinkers very much, thinking now of Palin (not the Monty Python Palin), Spears, and the like.

          Thanks for the time that you took reading and commenting!

          Warmest regards,

          Doc

          Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

          by Translator on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 08:26:56 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Some who have made the most lasting (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Translator, old wobbly

            impressions on me were Fritz Perls, Alan Watts, Karl Menninger, a couple of Nobel Prize winners and a few gifted musicians. Then there are some of the lawyers I have worked with--I learn something by even the most casual encounter.  I also love to talk to country people who are short on formal education but wise in ways you cannot get in a classroom.  I know several fighter aces from WW-II and they make me feel very humble.

            Then there is this biochemist in Kentucky......  

            It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government to save the environment. - Ansel Adams

            by Otteray Scribe on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 08:34:26 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  You have a rare gift. (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              foolknot, Otteray Scribe

              It is the ability to communicate with a diverse set of folks without making them feel inferior.  I very much attempt to do the same.  It has to do with respect for the person, not the title.  Here are your important words:

              Then there are some of the lawyers I have worked with--I learn something by even the most casual encounter.  I also love to talk to country people who are short on formal education but wise in ways you cannot get in a classroom.

              You soak up information for one reason:  you do not threaten people who have that information by being either "above" nor "below" them.  Most folks understand intimidation by people "above" them, but many highly educated people are just as scared of people "below" them.  The fact is that there is neither an above nor a below.  People are not quanta.  We all live in an analogue continuum, with many wormholes between different parts of it.

              Warmest regards,

              Doc

              Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

              by Translator on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 08:42:14 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  You nailed it my friend. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Translator

                And for me, it is now late and I have to be up and off to work at 6:30 in the morning.  I will check back in the morning or whenever I come up for air.

                Something funny happened to me a while back.  I was in line at the customer service counter at Wal-Mart. I glanced around and the customer waiting in line right behind me was one Dr. Ralph Stanley. A living legend. That was nice. BTW, I do not fawn over such people. If I talk to them I just talk about ordinary stuff that might interest anyone. You get more authenticity from the so-called famous person if they do not have to be "on" for you.

                It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government to save the environment. - Ansel Adams

                by Otteray Scribe on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 08:54:23 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  I had a similar experience in Fayetteville (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Otteray Scribe

                  when I ran into Dr. Benjamin Spock (the baby doctor) at the local IGA grocery store.  We talked about the weather and a coming political gathering, but not about his work.

                  Warmest regards,

                  doc

                  Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

                  by Translator on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 09:00:23 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

    •  Yes Saw Him in Boulder& He loved to write Checks (7+ / 0-)

      I saw him read at Mackey Auditorium Univ of Colo in 69, & sing with those little finger Cymbals too.

      A friend of mine owns a local Boulder bookstore & - he says Allen around Boulder, Almost always paid for things by Check - whether books, dinnner. etc. He learned pretty quickly that p'raps half of those checks were never cashed - folks would keep them for the signature.  Thus the beat Poet remained True to those roots, living cheaply as possible.....

      Lee  

      Blind loyalty to self-defeating strategies is equally destructive as working for your enemy.

      by Hiroprotag on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 07:25:39 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks (6+ / 0-)

    I'm originally from Ark and am a poet who spent many years in NYC on the poetry scenes, and knew Ginsberg and others. A good friend studied under Whitehead and Miller Williams at UofA. She's a well-known poet. I left Ark as soon as I got out of high school, so I never went to UofA, except to visit friends.

    That squeeze box thing was probably his Harmonium, which he used a lot in performances. Was the friend that was with him named Steven?

    Anyway, thanks for the story. Fun to read.

    "If religion is the opiate of the masses, then fundamentalism is the amphetamine." Miz Vittitow

    by MillieNeon on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 07:13:19 PM PDT

  •  I Was Lucky Enough to Hear Ginsberg (5+ / 0-)

    do spoken word back in the late 1980's..also at a university (Butler, I believe) and he opened with a similar proclamation.

    he did a piece about not doing the state sanctioned drugs (cigs, booze).. I had never looked at it that way prior.

    BTW, if you can find it, he has a great essay regarding now drug abuse used to be treated as a medical issue, and how it's been all downhill since drugs were criminalized.

    The bank bailouts are a failure. Robert Reich

    by Superpole on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 07:17:04 PM PDT

  •  OWWwwoooooooooo!!!!!! (4+ / 0-)

    Having credibility when making an argument is the straightest path to persuasion.

    by SpamNunn on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 07:22:41 PM PDT

  •  I have seen Ginsberg also (4+ / 0-)

    it is shocking (in a great way) to behold.

  •  I didn't meet him, (4+ / 0-)

    but I did see him perform in Ann Arbor, MI a year or two before he died.  Patti Smith opened.. I did meet Ken Kesey, though.  I was sixteen, I think, and had no idea (really) who he was.  I remember him talking about seeing the Grateful Dead play at the Great Pyramids, and dosing the natives..  I regret that I didn't read "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test" 'til a few months later.  

    "War can be likened to an erectile penis: an excellent assurance of domestic tranquility, but a dangerous temptation to foreign adventure." -unknown

    by Super Grover on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 07:24:58 PM PDT

    •  Mrs. Translator and I went (3+ / 0-)

      to the Kesey reading in the same venue some time later, but he was not audience challenging, and there was a very long line of autograph seekers, so I did not bother him.  He was entertaining, though.

      Wolfe's books are all well researched, and I recommend ...Test as an excellent history of that era in our civilization.  At the risk of diary pimping, you should drop by my series on Sunday evenings at 9:00 Eastern, Pique the Geek.  I am just about to wrap up a very long subseries on drugs of abuse, and am discussing psychedelics at present.

      Thanks for commenting!

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

      by Translator on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 07:29:21 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I'll try (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Translator, Otteray Scribe

        and remember to drop in.  Sounds interesting.

        "War can be likened to an erectile penis: an excellent assurance of domestic tranquility, but a dangerous temptation to foreign adventure." -unknown

        by Super Grover on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 07:36:11 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Remember, the only stupid (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Super Grover, Otteray Scribe

          question is the one not asked.  If you are unclear about something, there are probably a dozen other equally unclear.

          I NEVER abuse anyone for asking questions, because if I have not explained a topic properly it is my fault, not that of the reader.  The one exception is made for questions like "So, when did you quit beating your wife?" ones, but I have yet to have on of those traps.

          My goal in life is to learn, and by teaching a little I learn a lot.

          Warmest regards,

          Doc

          Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

          by Translator on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 07:39:37 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  I kidnapped him once... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Translator, Super Grover

    It was after a reading at a college in upstate NY in the mid to late 1980s. I took him to a queer anarchist commune where I lived at the time. He was much more interested in questions about masturbation from young queers fresh out of the closet than questions about poetry from grad students. Any request to sign copies of Howl visibly irritated him. One radical Lesbian became indignant when he argued that everyone likes boys. That evening was my overriding memory of that historical period.

  •  I met him at Skidmore College (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Translator

    after I graduated, made a special trip back to see him perform. Yeah, you gotta call it perform, cause he didn't just read poetry, he played that accordian thing and sang some pretty stupendous lyrics.

    He talked very easily and familiarly with the attendees afterward, spoke freely about his exploits. I couldn't do them justice.

    Anyone else see him in the New Year's 1984 special "Good Morning Mr. Orwell"?

  •  I Think I Trump Y'all! (5+ / 0-)

    I met Ginsberg in Atlanta in 1974.  I was an antiwar and general lefty activist; he had a speaking engagement and we and a few others had dinner at a mutual friend's place.

    As for "oh yes, fuck me in the ass" I later was told by our host that Ginsberg had discreetly expressed interest in fucking me in the ass, or having me fuck him in the ass, I never learned exactly which.  (I was young, skinny and cute, and was occasionally hit on by gay men).  As it happens, I am heterosexual, so that never came to pass.

    Ginsberg was certainly an interesting poet, and a very witty guy.  It might in fairness be recalled that he was not only gay, which offends me not at all, but an avid pedophile, which is where I get off.  I don't think Catholic priests, beat poets, or indeed adults of any sort should be touching children.

    But Ginsberg did make us all laugh a lot at dinner, and it was I admit fun meeting him.

  •  That's pretty awesome, Doc! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Blueiz, Translator

    IMHO, "OH, YES, FUCK ME IN THE ASS!" is the best way to start any speech or written work. :-)

    I was on a Beat binge recently (I need to go back and finish it, as I got distracted by HST after On The Road) and I was instantly enamored of the spontaneity, the raw energy of the style.

    No more theocracy - Long live the Green Revolution! (-10.00,-8.87)

    by Texas Revolutionary on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 07:52:11 PM PDT

    •  Hello, my friend! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Texas Revolutionary, foolknot

      Now you know how I write my posts.

      In high school, I was taught to outline carefully my points, then reoutline them, refine them more, and only then fill in the information.  I found that very restrictive, and it made my creativity suffer.

      Now I write a very rambling, stream of consciousness first draft and sleep on it.  I do try to separate ideas into different paragraphs to make it easier the next day to review and improve it.

      I do not write well without being spontaneous, nor do I address an audience well.  That is not to say that I do not have a good idea of what I intend to say, but going from a script makes for a boring talk and for a boring post.

      I have addressed orally folks from schoolkids to full generals and members of Congress, and never worked from notes.  I remember Fine Arts class in high school when it was required to use the little 3" by 5" cards.  It just cramped my style.

      Warmest regards, and do not forget that this Sunday we will discuss the psychedelic indoles.

      Warmest regards, and I can always count on you for a very positive word.  I appreciate that.

      Doc

      Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

      by Translator on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 08:00:07 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Spontaneity is always more fun. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Translator

        I was taught to do that same outline thing when writing. I never found it useful though. I usually edit things while I write, which makes for slow writing but more interesting reading. Even if somehow the topic shifts emphasis over the course of the text when I let myself go!

        Don't worry, I won't forget PtG! Psychedelic Indoles? LOL I'm there! :-)

        No more theocracy - Long live the Green Revolution! (-10.00,-8.87)

        by Texas Revolutionary on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 08:23:45 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I'm not a big fan of poetry, but one poem (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Translator

    I liked from the first time I read it was The Velocity of Money

    http://www.poemhunter.com/...

    "Newt's all for new ideas. He doesn't HAVE any. He's just FOR them."--Bob Dole.

    by Inland on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 08:05:46 PM PDT

    •  Thanks! I will link tomorrow and read (0+ / 0-)

      it.

      As you likely know, if you read my Pique the Geek series on Sunday evenings at 9:00 PM, is that I have promised not to look up things whilst the active comment period is on, since that would make me seem smarter than a really am, so I dance naked, so to speak, during the blackout time.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

      by Translator on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 08:13:01 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  First encounter: August 1972 (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Translator, john keats, BonnieSchlitz

    Arrested outside Nixon's renomination Convention, I'd been placed in a cell with Peter Orlovsky, Allen's lover, and the worst cellmate I've ever had. Allen was waiting in the hallway when we were released. Told me I was too young to be a revolutionary, and i should go back to school. I didn't.



    Practicing Law without a License is my 3d favorite Crime.

    by ben masel on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 08:19:16 PM PDT

    •  LOL! Great story! (0+ / 0-)

      Ben, I am sorry but I lost the box of purple hull seeds for you.  I am still looking for it, but I fear that you will have to wait until next year to get a crop as far north as you live.  I promise that I will send them as soon as I find them.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

      by Translator on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 08:21:19 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Second encounter, early 1977 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Translator, BonnieSchlitz

    Allen's giving a reading at Folger Shakespeare Theater, next door to the Supreme Court. I'm liveing in the DC Yippie collective, and we were laid on a dozen tickets, which turn out to be right behind Joan Mondale, wife of the new Vice President. her Secret Service detail freaks, demanding we be removed, and holding up the show. the ushers work out a compromise, opening a skybox for the 2nd Lady.

    all i remember of Allen's performance is his "how to quit smoking." Lay in a 10 day supply of LSD and food, and a lover. Whenever you get the urge to smoke, instead suck on your favorite part of their anatomy.



    Practicing Law without a License is my 3d favorite Crime.

    by ben masel on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 08:26:33 PM PDT

    •  LOL! I suppose that would (0+ / 0-)

      prevent smoking for at least ten days!  I am doing well with my protocol, having quit commercially prepared ones (I bought my last in March) and relying on Prince Albert and Top leaves since then.  Tomorrow I shall start pulling the leaves from the book and will not use more that the allotment that I choose, looking at ten a day for now, then down by one a day a week for a while.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

      by Translator on Tue Jun 16, 2009 at 08:31:00 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Yeah (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cosette, BonnieSchlitz

    but I looked and you have never been to my tomb.  Rome.  Protestant Cemetery.  Easy to find.

    Bring flowers.

  •  It was (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Translator

    Peter Orlovsky with Ginsburg in Fableville.  Doc, our poet friend Neil was working at a college in rural Maryland where Ginsburg spoke.  Neil had the honor of driving the famous man to DC to the airport.

    The most famous people I drove in my car were Rick Danko and Garth Hudson.  Rick was a blast, but Garth pretended to sleep.  I did talk to Kesey and his wife Fay on the phone quite a bit, and was sitting on the floor of the SEAU stage next to where Kesey stood for his reading.

    I have a bunch of things autographed by John Hartford and Donald Harington.

    Dad, how do I give you tips and points and whatever?

    •  Hello, my dear friend. I thought about (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Just as a Beverage

      calling you before I posted, but got busy editing and it was getting late.  I did not know that about Neil.  Good for him.

      The way to do tips is to hit the "Recommend" button at the first comment that the poster makes.  If you post here a lot, you will also find a "Hide" button, which is essentially an anti-tip.  The more tips one gets, the closer to "Trusted User" status one gets, and once you get there you get the ability to have your own "Hide" button.  The real advantage is Trusted Users can still read comments that are hidden from causal readers.

      More importantly, the Recommend this Diary button appears to the right and closer to the top of a diary.  By hitting that button, you tell the community rather than just the author that this is worth reading.  The eight or ten diaries with the most Recommends rise, like cream, the the top of the bucket and so do not scroll off so fast.

      Big event tomorrow:  Mrs. Translator and I celebrate our 32nd wedding anniversary.  Unfortunately we are separate in space at present, and she is out in the field with Eldest Son, catching, sampling, tagging, and releasing alligators (that is his Master's thesis work).

      Please say hello to Mrs. Beverage for me.  By the way, have you had any progress with Daughter?

      Give me a call soon.  You have my number.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

      by Translator on Wed Jun 17, 2009 at 06:30:21 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  OK, (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Translator

        I'm reccing you now.  Daughter #1 is difficult.

        •  I appreciate the rec! (0+ / 0-)

          I am also very sympathetic about Eldest Daughter.  With just a little luck, things will change for the better, but do not expect it for a while.

          Sunday is the next to the last installment of "Drugs of Abuse" on Pique the Geek.  Then the next one will the be opus, complete with the Moody Blues about LSD.

          Hang in there, Catdaddio!

          Warmest regards,

          Dad (those reading who not not know us personally will just have to guess).

          Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

          by Translator on Thu Jun 18, 2009 at 06:53:05 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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