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This diary is inspired by Cynthia Davis, the brain-dead political hack from Missouri who thinks that supplying food to hungry children is somehow a bad thing. I won't argue her point. To argue this issue with her is to give validity to her opinions, and those opinions are so far beyond the rational that to argue them is to elevate them. I am not willing to do this for her.

But this not really about her. It is about the poor in this country and what it means to grow up hungry in America. I am going to put some of the private issues of my life out here this evening. Many of these memories are painful, but I hope that they will carry some weight.

I grew up poor and hungry in west-central Illinois during the Reagan years. I was born in 1972. It is my belief that my father (who is not, and never has been, good with money) has never earned above $30,000 a year, and almost certainly never during my childhood.

Our house was on a double lot, and backed onto Fayette Street. Half of the property was given over to a garden. We grew almost anything that would take root in the soil. Lettuce, spinach, radishes, carrots. Green beans (which my brother hated), peas, tomatoes (which I loathe), strawberries, onions, green peppers. We had a grape arbor, planted rhubarb, grew broccoli, cucumbers, potatoes, tried corn (massive fail) and watermelon (too small). We had two apricot trees, a peach tree, and a cherry tree. We even tried making our own ketchup (also fail). Every summer and fall, we would can massive amounts of vegetables and fruits, to tide us over during the winter months.

My grandparents on my father's side kept stock on a small farm in a small town to our south, and twice each winter, we would go south to butcher. Once for the pigs, once for the cows. I am not sure if we got the meat for free or if my grandparents let us have it at a reduced rate, but either way we got hundreds of pounds of meat for way less than what we would have to pay at the A & P or the Eagle.

It wasn't enough. It was never enough. With four boys within seven years of each other, a house payment, and my father terminally underemployed, it was never going to be enough.

In 1983, my father was putting up a radio tower in Missouri. For most of my life, he has been a free-lance electrician and radio engineer on a more-or less permenent basis. The tower fell. He was under it. He was fortunate not to die. His left leg was shattered and he walks with a limp to this day.

That is when I found out what it is like to really be poor. We ate homemade vegetable soup almost every night (it seems) during that interminable winter of 1983-84. Most of my clothes were hand-me-downs, from  people who went to the church that my mother's parents attended. It was always cold in the house that winter. In December, parishioners of the Mount Zion Lutheran Church (Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod) left a small artificial Christmas tree on our front porch. They had pinned money that most of them could not afford to the branches. My mother cried.

It was during that winter that I grew to know and hate that damned goverment cheese. We used in everything from sandwiches to chili. It was pale and it was impossible to cut and it was awful.

My brothers and I also had reduced rate lunches at school. I remember exactly how much it cost. It was 40 cents that you would drop into the big plastic cup in the lunch line at Washington Elementary. Cynthia Davis must really hate that idea. But it saved my parents eighty cents a day, between me and my brother (a buck-sixty when the other two were old enough to attend school). Eighty cents a day is four bucks a week, which is over a hundred dollars for the school year, and that could buy you a hell of a lot of rice and milk and peanut butter and gas in 1984.

I got out. Two of my brothers got out. The third is trying. But here is the thing.  We are all still haunted by the experience of growing up poor. Despite my good job and house and refrigerator full of food, inside I am still that kid with the patched jeans and the runny nose waiting for the reduced-rate lunch in 1984. And I am terrified that somehow it will all be taken away from me. We are all terrified of the debt that ruined our parents' marriage.

Let me set you straight, Senator. The poor are not bad people. My father could have taken Social Security disability in 1983. He is still working to this day. My mother raised four boys on a pittance, saw one go to college, three get married, and still baby-sits small children to help out her husband. One bad accident you could put you where we are. One illness, one divorce, one lost election, and you could be there, asking for your reduced-rate lunch.

And then, maybe, you would understand what so many of us in this country have gone through, and are still going through.

Then, maybe, you would have some compassion.

Originally posted to Glaze72 on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 07:57 AM PDT.

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Comment Preferences

  •  I hate that cheese too (12+ / 0-)

    I had a winter in the early 80's when I had to eat a lot of it.  It's almost a stretch to call it food.  I remember seeing Nancy Reagan on TV trying to make is sound like the lucky poor folks were dining on brie.

    I wish everyone could experience (at least a season of) poverty so that they'd know what it's like and commit themselves to doing what they could to allieviate it for everyone.  Better would be if nobody every experienced at all, but that's not gonna happen for a long time.  

    •  I'm so old I remember when there were two kinds (5+ / 0-)

      of government cheese in the monthly "relief box".

      I too am a child of farm and labor, and my dad was hurt in an industrial accident: a mechanic, he was working under a car when he shut off the torch he'd been using to patch an exhaust, and a spark traveled up the (faulty) gas line and blew up the acetylene tank.

      He was hospitalized for a week, and couldn't walk for nearly two years.

      Government cheese came in two sorts: a small loaf, 3 pounds, of actually not too bad Cheddar cheese, that made excellent toasted sandwiches, and a big block of pale American cheese.

      Didn't like it as much but could eat it when we ran out of everything else. I still remember the other things in those boxes of USDA Commodity Program groceries -- prunes, raisins, peanut butter, dry beans, canned turkey, rice, powdered eggs, powdered milk, canned luncheon meat, glass bottles of corn syrup, cornmeal, flour, and, sometimes, dried fruit other than prunes.

      Sometimes I think we did the poor a huge disservice switching to the SNAP cards...

      Texas: Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Lady Bird & LBJ, Ann Richards, Sam Rayburn, Dan Rather, Ike, Sully Sullenberger, Lloyd Bentsen. It's No Bush League!

      by BlackSheep1 on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 09:46:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes. I helped distribute the (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        AllisonInSeattle, ladybug53

        "cheese food product" (à la velveeta) and sometimes (much more rarely) bricks of real cheddar cheese. We nearly always had real butter to distribute as well. (See my comment far below.)

        Book excerpts: nonlynnear; other writings: mofembot.

        by mofembot on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 12:30:44 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  my parents picked up real butter in the late 80s (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ladybug53, mofembot

          because they were both on Social Security and still didn't meet the "poverty level" income guidelines.

          Sometimes there would be a five-pound block of pale American cheese, but most months there were three pounds of butter apiece. Some months, there'd be a box of powdered milk, too.

          We had a huge, huge scandal in Texas when thousands of pounds of cheese that was supposed to go into that program turned up in a landfill somewhere close to El Paso, as I recall.

          Texas: Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Lady Bird & LBJ, Ann Richards, Sam Rayburn, Dan Rather, Ike, Sully Sullenberger, Lloyd Bentsen. It's No Bush League!

          by BlackSheep1 on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 11:33:47 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Reminds me of my rich Republican (8+ / 0-)

    sister-in-law who never worked day in her life scoffing at 'the poor' who ought to just 'pull themselves up by their bootstraps.'

    She said this to me when I was telling her about a very poor family in Southern Illinois:  five teenage sons and one shirt between them.  The one who got to wear the shirt is the one who went to school that day.

    They were beyond hunger as an incentive.

  •  Ah, childhood memories (12+ / 0-)

    Some of these folks don't realize that we don't all have warm, fuzzy memories of living with Donna Reed or the Beaver or The Brady Bunch.

    I, too, remember government cheese. This was in the 50's and I was living with my grandparents for a time. My grandfather was an ex-coal miner and was then working as a janitor at the elementary school. I would go with my grandmother to pick up the government surplus.

    I bet she was against SCHIP too. She'd think a sick child could be motivating for the parents. And, of course, they didn't prioritize their budget correctly.

  •  How dare you (6+ / 0-)

    besmirched government cheese. I have eaten it when I was young and have yet to find a better cheese for grilled cheese sandwiches and mac and cheese. Take back that insult damn it take it back. SMILE

    Know your story well! Hope things have gotten better for you since childhood.

    Resistance is futile! You will be assimilated.

    by Diamond Jim55 on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 08:37:51 AM PDT

  •  If the current budget passes in here Illinois (10+ / 0-)

    thousands of families wont even have that cheese.

    The poor are not bad people.

    Amen. They are people. And they can be powerful.
    Feel the power...

    Politicians need to stop playing with people's lives.

  •  The Reagan Years, in the Midwest..... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jimreyn, Diogenes2008, chrome327

    ....  bleeeeeeaaaaach.

    Very good diary.

    "Toads of Glory, slugs of joy... as he trotted down the path before a dragon ate him"-Alex Hall/ Stop McClintock

    by AmericanRiverCanyon on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 08:54:57 AM PDT

  •  I don't recall being hungry, (8+ / 0-)

    but my older brother and sister do. There was a 4 year break, then me and my younger brother. I guess the folks got their act together a little better in the meantime. And I understand my mother "lost" a child or two during that time.

    But we only ever had soda at holiday time, no twinkies, no extras. We sure were four skinny kids. But most everyone was skinny back then.

    My best friend was one of six kids in a small three bedroom house. I used to eat lunch at her house a lot. Her mother had chocolate milk powder for the kids. I thought it was heaven. I remember them doling it out like it was gold powder. My friend later told me they got one can a month and had to make it last. I was a burden on them. I guess they felt sorry for my family. Sheesh.

    Anyone who isn't confused doesn't really understand the situation. Edward R. Murrow

    by lexalou on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 09:06:50 AM PDT

    •  I think that's half of why our family (3+ / 0-)

      is so heavy now.  You remember the lean years, and you start eating anything that comes your way :P

      Bah. Typoed during acct creation. It's Ezekiel 23:20

      by Ezekial 23 20 on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 11:05:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Prenatal nutrition (3+ / 0-)

        .... mothers who don't eat a balanced adequate diet during pregnancy tend to have children who are more prone to have health problems later in life. Some sort of study was done of Dutch famine survivors from the era of post WWII, their offspring tended to be smaller at birth then heavier as adults.

        "Toads of Glory, slugs of joy... as he trotted down the path before a dragon ate him"-Alex Hall/ Stop McClintock

        by AmericanRiverCanyon on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 12:11:55 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  yep, I'm absolutely sure this is an issue for me (3+ / 0-)

        I survived my first pregnancy by eating the leftover sandwiches that the preschoolers in the day care centre I was working at didn't eat, and from the graham cracker and peanut butter snacks. I was at that point feeding two adults on $5 a week. My daughter and I survived being on welfare for three years during the Reagan era by going to soup kitchens, dumpster diving, and learning a million ways to get a kid to eat government cheese (we had $23 a month in food stamps--the commodities were a life-saver). My starving friends and I used to crash art openings for the free food. If there was food put out for an event and I spotted it through a window as I walked by, I found a back door to slip through and ate it as if I might not get a meal the next day--because that was the reality.

        Years later these habits haven't left me. If someone in the house doesn't finish what's on their plate I feel compelled to eat it. If there's a buffet for a meeting at work, I pile up my plate even if the food isn't that great or I'm not that hungry.

        Political Compass says: -8.88, -8.67
        "We never sold out cos no one would buy."--J Neo Marvin

        by expatyank on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 03:23:05 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  excellent diary (11+ / 0-)

    thank you for sharing your story.

    I was humbled earlier this week. I stopped by the grocery store on the way home (bad idea to go shopping when you are starving and tired.) I stopped for a six pack of beer, but somehow loaded up with a bunch of impulse buys of fancy snacks as well.

    I stood behind a woman in line who had her cart full of the following food, which she paid for with her Lone Star Card (Texas Food Stamp Card): five loaves of white bread, two crates of Ramen noodles, two bags of cheetos, a pound of sugar, five packs of hot dogs, two packs of baloney, four gallons of off-brand pink drink, and a bag some some kind of frozen meat.

    I felt awful that her family would live on that for however long they could. The food had almost no nutritional value, no fruit or vegetable or dairy.  And I was impulse buying gourmet snacks. I went out to my car that had a bicycle rack and an Obama sticker and reflected how my marathon training is such an elite sport compared to a family like that one.  I can't seem to forget her.

    We have nowhere else to go... this is all we have. (Margaret Mead)

    by bruised toes on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 09:25:20 AM PDT

    •  at least she had a Lone Star Card (7+ / 0-)

      and was attempting to do right by the family. Sometimes that Gubmint largesse doesn't amount to much. Maybe she has a vegetable garden like the diarist did.

      Anyone who isn't confused doesn't really understand the situation. Edward R. Murrow

      by lexalou on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 09:31:21 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Sounds like what one would buy for kids (7+ / 0-)

        .... who are notoriously picky eaters no matter what the budget, so she can't afford to experiment, hopefully they're getting some sort of school breakfast and lunch program during the rest of the year.

        I just ate a piece of gf bread that I made, but one, I have to make my own because of food intollerances, and two, I had the time to make it and the knowledge of how to do it, plus a functional kitchen. And the luxury of being able to afford the ingredients.   A lot of working poor are working so many hours that they're too exhausted to do this.

        One stereotype I'd love to bust is that when I've seen non English speaking immigrants at the huge discount grocery at the city to the north of me, which has a lot of farmworkers, their grocery carts are full of non junk food, and full of the nutritious basics that one cooks from scratch.  I've stood in line and we've exchanged silent bemused glances at each other's cart contents. One time there was a cashier who held up a bag of little green objects in puzzlement from the customer ahead of me and called out
        "DOES ANYONE KNOW WHAT THIS IS ?"

        The man suddenly got this uh oh look on his face.

        "BRUSSELS SPROUTS !"  I said, trying to enunciate as clearly as possible.

        "whadya do with these?"

        "like mini cabbages. it's a vegetable."

        "Oh, okay."  Another crisis averted. Finds the category for the code, scans the things and continues.  

        "Toads of Glory, slugs of joy... as he trotted down the path before a dragon ate him"-Alex Hall/ Stop McClintock

        by AmericanRiverCanyon on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 12:07:29 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  You can't get soap or paper goods with AFDC (3+ / 0-)

      and yet you can get all the soda, gum, etc. you can pile in the cart, if you so desire.

      I do not understand these rules.

      WIC, too, is anti-produce. The new rules won't even let you get the Big Tex juices that were available in the 1980s on that program.

      Texas: Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Lady Bird & LBJ, Ann Richards, Sam Rayburn, Dan Rather, Ike, Sully Sullenberger, Lloyd Bentsen. It's No Bush League!

      by BlackSheep1 on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 09:51:41 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  WIC exists to enrich the dairy companies, Kellogg (0+ / 0-)

        and Del Monte. The fact that they only allow specific brands really used to tick me off.
        OTOH, in Oregon they did allow Tillamook and Bandon cheese, which is pretty good stuff...

        Political Compass says: -8.88, -8.67
        "We never sold out cos no one would buy."--J Neo Marvin

        by expatyank on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 03:25:33 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  down in Texas in the 1980s WIC allowed cheese (0+ / 0-)

          but now it has to be nonfat.

          Texas: Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Lady Bird & LBJ, Ann Richards, Sam Rayburn, Dan Rather, Ike, Sully Sullenberger, Lloyd Bentsen. It's No Bush League!

          by BlackSheep1 on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 11:30:43 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Government cheese seems to be a fixture (4+ / 0-)

    of the Reagan years . . .

    In any event, I recall being invited to lunch back then at one of my more affluent acquaintance's place and being served government cheese, which I found to be rather curious.

    Upon timid inquiry, it turned out that it wasn't government cheese at all, but some type of vegan cheese . . . . ugh.

  •  I remember being told by a friend (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Kewalo, ladybug53, pixxer, Sand Hill Crane

    I grew up with about being poor.  With catsup for dinner, thinned, to make soup, and that was all they had to eat.  I hadn't known.  He was and is a great guy.  As was his family.  I had no idea that their lives were so different from mine.

  •  I do the best I can (7+ / 0-)

    to try and not remember my childhood. It was dismal. I'm older then most of you and as far as I know even government cheese wasn't available to us. My personal horror story was taking a sandwich for my lunch (no hot lunches at our school) and it was a scrambled egg. To this day I get that squirmy embarrassed feeling just thinking about it. I don't remember ever being hungry which is a blessing, but I also don't remember feeling full.

    It was not a positive motivator. It was a horror.

    Thank you for sharing your story, even though it brought back my memories.

  •  I'm so glad this diary was rescued - excellent! (4+ / 0-)

    HOPE for CA: http://www.couragecampaign.org/

    by slowbutsure on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 09:11:20 PM PDT

  •  Wow, you found some real Christians. (6+ / 0-)

    In December, parishioners of the Mount Zion Lutheran Church (Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod) left a small artificial Christmas tree on our front porch. They had pinned money that most of them could not afford to the branches. My mother cried.

    That is a beautiful story.

    I remember getting Massachusetts free food - some cheese, some other odd stuff. It helped. The idea of supporting people through rough times ought to be second nature to us. What is wrong with people who would begrudge a child a wholesome meal?

    Our system of law is premised on the idea that an unfettered government - rather than criminals - is the greatest danger to our lives and liberty.
    NCrissieB

    by pixxer on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 09:15:27 PM PDT

    •  pixxer, they're Republicans, free-marketers, and (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Kentucky DeanDemocrat, pixxer

      libertarians -- all devoid of any emotion more complex than selfishness.

      Texas: Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Lady Bird & LBJ, Ann Richards, Sam Rayburn, Dan Rather, Ike, Sully Sullenberger, Lloyd Bentsen. It's No Bush League!

      by BlackSheep1 on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 09:54:08 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Wait... the people who put money (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BlackSheep1

        on the Christmas tree that they could not afford??

        Or are you referring to the people (reference the diary) who would begrudge children food? Of course I was referring to the republican anti-Christianity at this point!

        Our system of law is premised on the idea that an unfettered government - rather than criminals - is the greatest danger to our lives and liberty.
        NCrissieB

        by pixxer on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 09:56:54 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I meant the nasty pieces of work in the Missouri (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ladybug53, pixxer

          and Texas legislatures who begrudge children food  -- and their parents the help to set those kids' futures on a brighter path.

          Debbie Riddle and Cynthia Davis, and all their "good hardworking Christian American" ilk.

          Texas: Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Lady Bird & LBJ, Ann Richards, Sam Rayburn, Dan Rather, Ike, Sully Sullenberger, Lloyd Bentsen. It's No Bush League!

          by BlackSheep1 on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 10:03:47 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Oh ya, for sure. Christians leave money (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            KS 65 woman

            they can't afford for people who need it more than they do. The rest are a write-off (don't we wish!) We agree, just looking at different parts of the post.

            Our system of law is premised on the idea that an unfettered government - rather than criminals - is the greatest danger to our lives and liberty.
            NCrissieB

            by pixxer on Sat Jun 27, 2009 at 10:09:41 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  I went to Cynthis Davis's (3+ / 0-)

    website since I was very curious about her. She and her husband own a christian bookstore. They have seven children who look all well fed and healthy.

    I would love to write her a letter but she only excepts those from her district. In this country it is a crime to let our children go hungry.

    My early years were near the end of WWII. My mom had stamps every month for some of our food. I can't remember what they were for. I know we would get this white looking margarine with a button on the side which was food coloring. When you pushed it and sqeezed it all around the margarine would turn yellow. LOL

    Being Catholic we didn't eat meat on Fridays and during Lent. We were so skinny that mom gave us cod live oil and some liquid iron that tasted terrible  ever night. It didn't fatten us up though.

    •  Oh KS, my memories are so similar to yours! (3+ / 0-)

      We lived in a small Canadian town on the border with the U.S. and once a month or so we used to go 'across the river' to shop in the American grocery stores because their prices were lower.  We had to walk because we had no car and I have such vivid memories of my mom and my little sister and I carrying all these big heavy bags, and once we got home doing the margarine mushing you talk about.

      A neighbour went to a farm once a week just outside of town and was kind enough to allow one of us to ride along to pick up our milk and eggs.  That milk was so good and we'd carefully spoon the cream off the top.  Some would be allowed to sour and white bread with sour cream and sprinkled sugar was often a meal.  It's funny, I still eat that once in awhile except I put it on whole wheat bread now.

      We were so terribly poor when I was a kid but I don't remember being hungry although I remember plenty of nights when only potatoes were on our dinner plate. I'm quite sure my mother was often hungry though.  

  •  I distributed government cheese. (6+ / 0-)

    I worked as the program director for a neighborhood United Way agency in the Pittsburgh area in the early-to-mid 1980s. My neighborhood was still reeling from the effects of the steel plants shutting down, and there was an entire "lost generation" of young men — guys who thought they'd be working in the steel plants just like their daddies, and so largely blew off school or other kinds of vocational training. Those who found work were in service and retail, and ther earnings were a far cry from what they had grown up expecting. Many were good Catholics who followed the pope's injunction against birth control...

    Anyway, there were lots of families who relied on the government cheese and butter (and occasionally other commodities) that we'd distribute about every 6 weeks or so. Many seemed so ashamed to have to come. We'd also deliver the goods to seniors and other shut-ins, and my god, the empty cupboards — they beggar description.

    As the rich continue to get richer in the U.S., as the poor get poorer, as the ranks of the poor swell in number... as Muskegon Critic warned, there is unrest. And it is growing, as it damned well should.

    No one should be ashamed of making any and every effort to feed themselves and their families, especially when the deck has been so stacked against them and the rules written and rewritten to favor economic and social inequality.

    Book excerpts: nonlynnear; other writings: mofembot.

    by mofembot on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 12:28:55 AM PDT

    •  empty cupboards... (4+ / 0-)

      I remember trying to come up with a meal for my daughter with the dregs of a bag of flour, one egg and a packet of sugar I had stuffed in my pocket someplace. And telling her I "wasn't hungry" with a fake smile as she ate her "pancake".
      Another time when all I had for her was the last part of a bag of frozen peas and a bread heel.

      No one should ever experience this.

      Political Compass says: -8.88, -8.67
      "We never sold out cos no one would buy."--J Neo Marvin

      by expatyank on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 03:31:12 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  My folks were teenagers ... (3+ / 0-)

    ....during the Great Depression. It marked them, too, as did living in poverty leave permanent scars on you.

    Different folks react differently, but people who grew up dirt poor never forget the experience. Some get used to it and never expect anything better. Some grab all the money they can. Some hoard. All fear losing whatever they have managed to grab.

    Your diary was wonderful. Really wonderful. It also shows why children should be able to grow up well fed, decently clothed, able to see a doctor, etc., - so that they won't have to carry the burden of poverty with them throughout their lives and won't end up passing those fears on to the next generation.

    "There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." --- Ed Howdershelt (Author)

    by SciMathGuy on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 03:38:09 AM PDT

    •  In the Reagan years in Texas $127 monthly (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ladybug53, SciMathGuy

      was too much income for a single mother with one child to qualify for food stamps.

      Texas: Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Lady Bird & LBJ, Ann Richards, Sam Rayburn, Dan Rather, Ike, Sully Sullenberger, Lloyd Bentsen. It's No Bush League!

      by BlackSheep1 on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 11:43:06 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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